Have a lot of questions about the study abroad process? You're not alone. Click below to see questions commonly asked by both students and parents. If you can't find the answer you are looking for, or you are still unsure about something, feel free to email us at studyabroad@uvm.edu.

General FAQs

I just decided I want to study abroad. What do I do?

The first thing you should do is attend a Study Abroad 101 session in the Career and Experience Hub. You can find a schedule of Study Abroad 101 sessions on our Calendar of Events. You should also activate your iAbroad account. Follow the steps in iAbroad in order of what needs to be completed.

By when should I have activated my iAbroad account?

To be in the best place possible to study abroad, you should activate your iAbroad account at least 12 months before you intend to study abroad. Ideally, you want to start three semesters beforehand. For example, if you intend to study abroad in the spring semester of your junior year, you should activate your iAbroad account fall semester of your sophomore year.

If I already know the program that I want to apply to, do I need to attend a Study Abroad 101 session?

Yes, Study Abroad 101 sessions are mandatory for all students intending to study abroad. Even if you know your program, there is still important information that needs to be shared with you before you apply.

I want to study abroad for more than one semester. Is this possible?

You need to discuss this with your academic advisor. If you and your academic advisor have determined that this is possible, get in contact with your regional study abroad advisor and they will make a second record for you in iAbroad.

I am overwhelmed with my options. Why can't someone just tell me what to do?

Studying abroad is a very personal journey. What might be right for one student may not be right for another. We encourage students to think about what they want out of their time abroad. Additional resources that may help you make your decision include the Transfer Guide and external program websites.

Do I need to meet with a regional advisor?

If you are going on a UVM bilateral exchange, ISEP exchange, or ISEP Direct program, you must meet with an advisor. If you are not going on any of these programs and you have questions or need additional advising, you are more than welcome to call OIE and make an appointment to meet with an advisor.

iAbroad FAQs

How many phases of iAbroad are there?

There are five phases of iAbroad: Inquiry, Apply, Conditional Acceptance, Pre-Departure, and Returnee. Each phase is individualized for each student. Before attending pre-departure orientation at the end of each semester, you need to have completed the first three phases.

I already completed the Inquiry phase for a program, but now I want to apply to a different program. Do I need to go through the Inquiry phase again?

You only need to complete the Inquiry phase once. However, if you try to apply to a different program, you may see this message in iAbroad: "You may not directly apply for this program. You must first complete the inquiry process through the Inquire tab above." If you see this message, contact a regional study abroad advisor. We will give your account permission to apply to multiple programs.

How do I select more than one academic interest?

If you are using a Mac, hold down the command key. If you are using a PC, hold down the control key.

What do the plain red balloons on the iAbroad map mean?

A plain red balloon means that the criteria you selected under the program search options was met but none of your academic interests were met.

What do the red balloons with a grey star on the iAbroad map mean?

A red balloon with a grey star means that the criteria you selected under the program search options was met and one or more, but not all of, your academic interests were met. 

What do the red balloons with a gold star on the iAbroad map mean?

A red balloon with a gold star means that the criteria you selected under the program search options was met, and all of your academic interests were met.

Some information in my iAbroad account is incorrect. How do I fix this?

Please contact your regional study abroad advisor and notify them of the incorrect information.

I am in Conditional Acceptance, and my academic advisor/Student Financial Services/Transfer Affairs hasn't filled out their portion yet.

If it has been less than a week, please be patient. If you are still concerned, kindly remind them that they should be receiving email from oies@uvm.edu.

For Parents

How much is this going to cost?

The costs associated with studying abroad depend on many different factors, including the type of program your student is going on and the country your student will be living in. The program type determines if your student is eligible for financial aid and scholarships. For more information, please visit our Finances page.

Where is my student going to live?

All of our programs come with different options for accommodation. Many students choose to live on campus, either with local students or fellow American students. Others may choose to live in off-campus housing with local students or students from the same program. Another good option for housing is with a local host family – this allows your student for an additional level of cultural and linguistic immersion. Please keep in mind that not all housing options are available for every program.

How and what will my student eat?

As with housing, different programs and countries offer different choices for meals. Dining halls may be available to your student for their meals. In some countries where dining halls are not as common, your student will probably purchase groceries and cook for him or herself at home. In other regions, going out to eat is a much more affordable option that it is in the U.S. Whatever option your student has, they will not go hungry.

Will other students be going on the same program?

This depends on the program type your student will be going on. If your student is going on a UVM semester program or a travel study program, he or she will be going with other UVM students. On an external program, he or she will most likely be going with students from other U.S. institutions. If your student has chosen an exchange program or has directly enrolled in another university, it is likely that your student will be going alone or with one or two other students.

How will my student access money while abroad?

Your student has many options for accessing money while in another country. Opening a bank account in the host country enables your student to easily and safely accept money by international wire transfer. Other options students have used in the past include using credit cards (beware of foreign transaction fees) or debit cards. Encourage your student to research what money options work best for them and the country they will be living in.

What is culture shock and how can it affect my student?

Culture shock, also known as cultural adjustment, is a very normal part of living in a new environment. You may have even experienced it by moving to a new city. Cultural adjustment typically occurs in 4 stages, seen below. However, please keep in mind that everyone responds to cultural adjustment differently, and that your student may not necessarily experience the following: Honeymoon phase - Everything is new and exciting. Your student may feel happy and excited during this period. Homesickness phase - Daily life may become difficult and frustrating. Your student may develop negative feelings toward the host culture and possibly feel depressed and feel like they are missing out on important events back home. Initial adjustment - Your student may begin to accept the difficulties of living in a new culture and gradually feel more oriented and comfortable. Adaptation - Your student may have established a network in the new culture and has begun to appreciate the differences between home and host countries.

What do I do if my student wants to come home?

Feelings of depression and homesickness can be common when living in a new country and culture. This is normal and part of the process of culture shock. If your student says they want to come home, try not to immediately buy them a flight back. Encourage your student to reflect through their feelings – what were their study abroad goals? What did they hope to accomplish while studying abroad? It is also recommended to encourage your student to engage in the same activities abroad as they did while at home. This will keep them active and help them to meet people who share similar interests. You may find that if you give your student a little time, they may not want to come home after all. It’s also important to monitor your student’s mood. If you have concerns that your student is dealing with severe emotional issues, please contact UVM’s Counseling and Psychiatry Services. Your student will continue to have the support of OIE while they are abroad. If your student wishes to come home, please make sure they speak with their regional study abroad advisor.

Can I visit my student?

While it’s great that you want to visit your student and see their life in another country, we recommend that you hold off on visiting your student until they are settled down in their new life. Give your student time to adjust to the new environment, learn the local language, and develop friendships. We also recommend that you visit while classes are not in session so as not to distract your student from important coursework. That way, your student will be able to enjoy your visit to the fullest.

If I've never traveled abroad before, how can I expect my student to?

Each year UVM sends many students abroad who are the first people in their families to do so. For some students, it’s even their first time leaving the state of Vermont. The Office of International Education is staffed by seasoned travelers who know how to properly prepare your student for living abroad. Your student will have the support of UVM before, during, and after their time abroad.

My student has returned from being abroad but seems different and slightly depressed. What's going on?

Your student may be experiencing re-entry transition. After spending a significant amount of time in another culture, your student may be having trouble adjusting back to life in the U.S. They may be confused about how to incorporate their new experiences and values into their old way of life. Additionally, they may be “homesick” for their host country and miss their friends, the food, and the town they lived in. This is completely normal, and is part of the study abroad process. To help get your student back on their feet, encourage them reach out to organizations in the community that may be affiliated with your student’s host country. Additionally, remind your student of UVM’s many re-entry activities. Visit the Returning from Study Abroad page for a list of post-study abroad activities for students.

 

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