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CITI Program Training

citi_2

What if I am unable to log into CITI with an active UVM Net ID?

First Option:

  1. Please make sure to click "Log In Through My Institution" (opens in a new window) to view the organizations listed to use "Single Sign On" (SSO) for CITI Program access, scroll down to click on “University of Vermont” and use your UVM Net ID and password to sign in (Single Sign On or SSO requires a username and password issued by University of Vermont).
  2. If you haven’t updated your password in the past year, you may need to go to UVM's Account Management page to change your Net ID password or reset a forgotten password.
  3. If you don’t have an active UVM Net ID, you may complete the Microsoft Office document icon Request for UVM Net ID form (DOC) and submit it to the RPO.

Second Option:

  1. If you continue to experience issues with the "Single Sign On" (SSO) for CITI Program Access, then a separate account can be created through the CITI program affiliated with the University of Vermont.
  2. Return to the main CITI Login Page (opens in a new window) and click the "Register" button at the top right of the page.
  3. Step 1: Select Your Organization Affiliation - "University of Vermont".
    • Agree to Terms of Service
    • Affirm that you are a UVM affiliate
    • Select "Continue To Create Your CITI Program Username/Password"
  4. Complete the Remaining Registration Steps 2 -7.

What if I do not want to complete a Request for UVM Net ID for Required Training form?

  1. A separate account can be created through the CITI program affiliated with the University of Vermont.
  2. Go to the main CITI Login Page (opens in a new window) and click the "Register" button at the top right of the page.
  3. Step 1: Select Your Organization Affiliation - "University of Vermont".
    • Agree to Terms of Service
    • Affirm that you are a UVM affiliate
    • Select "Continue To Create Your CITI Program Username/Password"
  4. Complete the Remaining Registration Steps 2 -7.

What if I have two CITI Program accounts? Can I merge two accounts?

Please contact CITI Support to merge duplicate accounts. You may also visit the CITI Program Support Center (opens in a new window) for assistance.

 

Human Subjects Training

Who Needs to Complete the Human Subjects in Research Training?  

  • All individuals involved in the conduct of research with human subjects, regardless of funding source, must complete the training.  This includes anyone, including consultants and off-site personnel, who have direct contact with subjects or access to the identifiable research data.  Consultants and collaborators from other institutions covered by Federal Assurance with the Office of Human Research Protections at the Department of Health and Human Services may provide certification of training from their own institution if their participation is not on site at UVM or UVM Medical Center. Alternatively, collaborating researchers may add or change their affiliation to UVM through CITI to register their completion.
  • Personnel who are designated as the primary contact person for a specific protocol are required to complete the training regardless of whether they have subject contact or access to subject data so that they understand their regulatory responsibilities.
  • Faculty who are listed as sponsors on student projects, course instructors for class projects, and students who are conducting research are also required to take the training.
  • Laboratory technicians are not required to be listed as key personnel on a research protocol if they do not have access to any of the 18 HIPAA Identifiers for our local subjects.  Additionally, it is not necessary to list laboratory technicians as key personnel when they are solely working with commercial materials or are working with unidentifiable materials (again with none of the 18 HIPAA identifiers) from another institution.

Note:  PIs and Faculty Sponsors (if applicable) who are listed on protocols that are deemed to be Exempt are required to take the training, but other listed key personnel are not required to take the training.

When should the Training be Done?

We require that the training be complete for all key personnel listed on new protocols prior to submission.  New approvals will not be released until all individuals involved with human subjects on the project have completed the training.

Which CITI Course(s) Do I Need to Take?

You may currently complete either the "Biomedical Research" or the "Social Behavioral Education Sciences" course. Both courses meet the required training for human subjects research, so you may decide what you want the focus of your content to be.

Will Other Training Programs Meet this Requirement? 

Completion of other training programs for local protocols will not meet the Committee’s requirement for training because a significant portion of the program addresses local policies & procedures.   If consultants and collaborators have completed CITI at their respective institution, they need to associate that training with the University of Vermont.  CITI instructions to associate with another institution are below.

Add/Change Affiliated Institution

How do I Document that I have Completed the Training?

A certificate of completion can be obtained from your CITI main menu at any time.

Additionally, you may go to our IRB Tutorial Completion page to view the list of people who have completed our required training.

How Often Do I Need to Be Retrained?

Every three years, all key personnel still listed on an active protocol are required to complete the entire training again.  The IRB will send a reminder as the anniversary nears.  If training expires, that individual will be administratively removed from all active protocols.  If the individual continues to work with human subjects after removal, it will be considered noncompliance.

Are There Other Types of Training?   

The IRB has established a listserve of all active key personnel.  Inclusion in this listserve is mandatory as long as you are working with human subjects.  This listserve is used to disseminate new regulatory information and process changes.

What is the passing grade for the required training?

You must achieve an average score of at least 85% across all required modules of the course you're taking.

 

Good Clinical Practice Training

What is Good Clinical Practice (GCP)?

Good Clinical Practice (GCP) is an international ethical and scientific quality standard for the design, conduct, performance, monitoring, auditing, recording, analyses and reporting of clinical trials.  Compliance with GCP provides assurance that the study data are credible and accurate and that the rights, safety, confidentiality and well-being of research participants are protected.

Is GCP training the same as Human Subject Training?

No. GCP training is a separate training and is not basic human subjects protection training.  GCP principles are specific to clinical trials.

Who is Required to Complete Good Clinical Practice Training?

  • GCP training is required for all investigators and key personnel who are involved in the conduct, oversight or management of clinical trials involving Human Subjects irrespective of funding source supporting the research activity. 
  • All UVM Larner College of Medicine (LCOM) investigators/staff are required to complete Good Clinical Practice training regardless of whether the human subjects project meets the NIH clinical trial definition.

► View LCOM by Department

Clinical Trial: A research study in which one or more human subjects are prospectively assigned to one or more interventions (which may include placebo or other control) to evaluate the effects of those interventions on health-related biomedical or behavioral outcomes. For more information, see the NIH definition of a clinical trial and the 12 minute podcast "Understanding the Definition of a Clinical Trial and What That Means for You" (MP3). The transcript can be found through the Office of Extramural Research under News & Events  »  Virtual Learning  »  All About Grants Podcasts.

What is the Definition of a Clinical Trial?

A clinical trial is a research study in which one or more human subjects are prospectively assigned to one or more interventions (which may include placebo or other control) to evaluate the effects of those interventions on health-related biomedical or behavioral outcomes.

For more information, see the NIH definition of a clinical trial and the 12 minute podcast "Understanding the Definition of a Clinical Trial and What That Means for You" (MP3). The transcript can be found through the Office of Extramural Research under News & Events  »  Virtual Learning  »  All About Grants Podcasts.

What does the term prospectively assigned mean?

The term "prospectively assigned" refers to a pre-defined process (e.g., randomization) specified in an approved protocol that stipulates the assignment of research subjects (individually or in clusters) to one or more arms (e.g., intervention, placebo, or other control) of a clinical trial.

What is the definition of an intervention?

An intervention is defined as a manipulation of the subject or subject's environment for the purpose of modifying one or more health-related biomedical or behavioral processes and/or endpoints.

Examples include: drugs/small molecules/compounds; biologics; devices; procedures (e.g., surgical techniques); delivery systems (e.g., telemedicine, face-to-face interviews); strategies to change health-related behavior (e.g., diet, cognitive therapy, exercise, development of new habits); treatment strategies; prevention strategies; and, diagnostic strategies.

What is Health-Related Biomedical or Behavioral Outcomes?

Health-related biomedical or behavioral outcome is defined as the pre-specified goal(s) or condition(s) that reflect the effect of one or more interventions on human subjects' biomedical or behavioral status or quality of life.

Examples include: positive or negative changes to physiological or biological parameters (e.g., improvement of lung capacity, gene expression); positive or negative changes to psychological or neurodevelopmental parameters (e.g., mood management intervention for smokers; reading comprehension and/or information retention); positive or negative changes to disease processes; positive or negative changes to health-related behaviors; and, positive or negative changes to quality of life.

Do my lab technicians need to complete GCP training?

Larner College of Medicine lab technicians who are listed as key personnel are required to complete GCP training.  It is essential that the entire study team be in the mind-set to protect subjects’ rights and assure data integrity from the bench to the bedside.  Lab technicians are equally responsible as other members of a research team for ensuring data integrity.  If a lab technician does not follow good practices and that results in data that cannot be used, then the subject’s participation is for nothing.

Note: Laboratory technicians are not required to be listed as key personnel on a research protocol if they do not have access to any of the 18 HIPAA Identifiers for our local subjects.  Additionally, it is not necessary to list laboratory technicians as key personnel when they are solely working with commercial materials or are working with unidentifiable materials (again with none of the 18 HIPAA identifiers) from another institution.

I am a social behavioral researcher, do I need to take GCP?

Yes, GCP training is required for all UVM/UVMMC investigators and clinical trial staff involved in a clinical trial, regardless of funding source.

Clinical Trial: A research study in which one or more human subjects are prospectively assigned to one or more interventions (which may include placebo or other control) to evaluate the effects of those interventions on health-related biomedical or behavioral outcomes. For more information, see the NIH definition of a clinical trial and the 12 minute podcast "Understanding the Definition of a Clinical Trial and What That Means for You" (MP3). The transcript can be found through the Office of Extramural Research under News & Events  »  Virtual Learning  »  All About Grants Podcasts.

What are the GCP requirements for External Collaborators listed on my protocol?

All study team members are required to complete GCP when the project is a clinical trial, even external collaborators. 

  • All UVM Larner College of Medicine (LCOM) investigators/staff are required to complete Good Clinical Practice training regardless of whether the human subjects project meets the NIH clinical trial definition.

View LCOM by Department

  • If the collaborator has completed CITI at their respective institution, they need to associate that training with the University of Vermont.  CITI instructions to associate with another institution are below.

► Add/Change Affiliated Institution

If the collaborator has completed another type of GCP training as required by their institution, then they need to submit the documention of completion to rpo@uvm.edu for our records.

When should the GCP training be completed?

GCP training must be completed for all key personnel listed on new protocols prior to submission.  New protocol approvals will not be released until all individuals on the protocol have met this requirement.

How Often Do I Need to Retake GCPs?

Every three years, all key personnel still listed on an active clinical trial are required to complete GCPs refresher training.

Which CITI Courses Meet the Requirement?

If working on a clinical trial or a UVM Larner College of Medicine Affiliate you should take ONE of the following GCP course options:

U.S. FDA Focus

  • GCP for Clinical Trials with Investigational Drugs and Medical Devices
  • GCP FDA Refresher (The refresher should be taken every 3 years subsequent to the completion of the course above)

OR

ICH Focus (if engaged in international research)

  • GCP for Clinical Trials with Investigational Drugs and Biologics
  • GCP ICH Refresher (The refresher should be taken every 3 years subsequent to the completion of the course above)

OR

Social and Behavioral Research

  • GCP – Social and Behavioral Research Best Practices for Clinical Research

 

Laboratory Animals Training

Who Needs to Complete the Laboratory Animals Training?  

If you are listed on an active IACUC protocol, either as PI or Key Personnel you are required to take the "General Lab Animal Training" course in addition to any animal-specific courses that you may be working with.

When should the Training be Done?

We require that the training be complete for all key personnel listed on new protocols prior to submission. If training and occupational health are not complete, they will not be listed on the protocol. New approvals will not be released until the PI on the project has completed the training.

Which CITI Course(s) Do I Need to Take?

You must complete the General Lab Animal Training course in addition to any Animal-Specific Courses for each species that is listed on the protocol. Also, if there is an IBC protocol associated with the IACUC protocol that you’re working on, you must complete the required IBC training if you are involved in that work. See the Biosafety Research Training below for more information.

Animal Science Student Training:

Department of Animal Science students, with assistance from faculty advisors, develop individualized programs.

These programs apply to farm, laboratory, zoo, and companion animals; their interaction with human society; and the contribution of animal products, such as milk and meat, to the world food supply.

Students working on such projects are required to complete appropriate CITI trainings before they can start working with live animals. This includes the General Lab Animal Training and the species-specific course for each species that is listed on the protocol. If the role of the student involves responsibilities not typically required of the class, such as husbandry or procedures with the animals, the student would be required to take additional training as appropriate.

The UVM Veterinarian (email link) should be contacted by the instructors for guidance.

Will Other Training Programs Meet this Requirement? 

Completion of other training programs for local protocols will not meet the Committee’s requirement for training because a significant portion of the program addresses local policies & procedures. Animal specific courses may meet UVM’s criteria and transfer over by affiliating your account with our institution, but the General Lab Animal Training will still need to be completed in order to meet UVM’s requirements.

Add/Change Affiliated Institution

How do I Document that I have Completed the Training?

A certificate of completion can be obtained from your CITI main menu at any time.

Additionally, you may go to our IACUC Tutorial Completion page (requires UVM NetID login) to view the list of people who have completed our required training.

How Often Do I Need to Be Retrained?

Every three years, all key personnel still listed on an active protocol are required to retake the General Lab Animal Training and the species-specific training(s). The IACUC will send a reminder as the expiration nears. If training expires, that individual will be administratively removed from all active protocols that they are listed on. If the individual continues to work with animals after removal, it will be considered noncompliance.

Are There Other Types of Training?   

The IACUC has established a listserve of all active key personnel. Inclusion in this listserve is mandatory as long as you are working on at least one IACUC protocol. This listserve is used to disseminate new regulatory information and process changes.

What is the passing grade for the required training?

You must achieve an average score of at least 80% across all required modules of the course you're taking.

 

Biosafety Research Training

Who Needs to Complete the Biosafety Research Training?

If you are listed on an active IBC protocol, either as PI or Key Personnel, you are required to complete CITI training.

When should the Training be Done?

We require that the training be complete for all key personnel listed on new protocols prior to submission. If the training is incomplete, they will not be listed on the protocol. New approvals will not be released until the PI on the project has completed the training.

Which CITI Course(s) Do I Need to Take?

Depending on the level of containment in which you are working, you will need to complete either the BSL-1 or BSL-2 Basic Course. Please note that the BSL-2 Basic course meets all the requirements for BSL-1 work. We encourage those working in BSL-1 containment to complete the BSL-2 training even though it is not required.

Additional CITI Courses:

If there is an IACUC protocol associated with the IBC protocol that you’re working on, you must also complete the Animal Biosafety course which can be found under question three of "Other IBC Courses":

  • "Are you currently or do you anticipate conducting IBC research that includes animal research?"

    • Select "Yes" and the Animal Biosafety course will be added to the UVM course listing to complete.

If working on both an IACUC and an IBC protocol (listed on the personnel roster), you must complete the required IACUC training. See the Laboratory Animals Training above for more information. 

When adding either the BSL-1 or BSL-2 course through CITI, you will be prompted to answer “yes” or “no” to whether you work with blood borne pathogens, select agents/DURC or nanotechnology. If you answer “yes” to any of these questions, the course will be added to your menu for you to take. IBC does not track blood borne pathogens so please check with EHS at safety@uvm.edu to see if this is required for. Select agent/DURC and nanotechnology training is required if these materials are listed on your protocol. Please contact RPO if you have questions about which trainings you are required to take.

Will Other Training Programs Meet this Requirement?

Completion of other training programs for local protocols will not meet the Committee’s requirement for training because a significant portion of the program addresses local policies & procedures. BSL-1 or BSL-2 trainings are required. Select agent/DURC or Nanotechnology courses may meet UVM’s criteria and transfer over by affiliating your account with our institution, but the BSL-1 or BSL-2 will still need to be completed in order to meet UVM’s requirements.

Add/Change Affiliated Institution

How do I Document that I have Completed the Training?

A certificate of completion can be obtained from your CITI main menu at any time.

Additionally, you may go to our IBC Tutorial Completion Page to view the list of people who have completed our required training.

How Often Do I Need to Be Retrained?

Every three years, all key personnel still listed on an active protocol are required to retake the BSL-1 or BSL-2 training as well as Select Agent/DURC and Nanotechnology if applicable. If training expires, that individual will be administratively removed from all active protocols that they are listed on. If the individual continues to work with biohazards after removal, it will be considered noncompliance.

Are There Other Types of Training?

The IBC has established a listserve of all active key personnel. Inclusion in this listserve is mandatory as long as you are working on at least one IBC protocol. This listserve is used to disseminate new regulatory information and process changes.

Environmental Health and Safety (EHS) Requirements:

Please note that the BSL-2 classroom training entitled "Biosafety for BSL-2 Laboratories" is still required for those listed on protocols that are BSL-2 containment. The classroom training needs to be updated every three years through EHS.

What is the passing grade for the required training?

You must achieve an average score of at least 80% across all required modules of the course you're taking.

 

HIPAA and Research

UVMHealth

A. How does the HIPAA Privacy Rule affect research?

A covered entity and its workforce members may not use or disclose individually identifiable health information (called “protected health information” or “PHI”) for research, except in one of the following circumstances:

  1. The patient has signed a written Authorization containing all the elements specified in the Privacy Rule;
  2. An IRB has waived or altered the requirement for HIPAA Authorization;
  3. The covered entity has “de-identified” the data prior to its use or disclosure for research; or
  4. The data are in the form of a “limited data set” containing no HIPAA “direct identifiers,” and” and the researcher has signed a HIPAA Data Use Agreement or DUA (if the data source is  UVM Medical Center, the DUA would need to be signed by UVM Medical Center per hospital policy).

B. What is the difference between HIPAA “Authorization” and informed consent?

Informed consent is required under federal research regulations for the protection of human subjects.  The HIPAA Privacy rule, a different regulation, separately requires that patients give written Authorization before a covered entity may use or disclose PHI for research.  There are different requirements for the content of informed consent and HIPAA Authorization; however both may be combined in one form.  An IRB may waive both consent and Authorization if the research meets all of the waiver criteria established by each of the applicable regulations. 

C. What are the required elements of a HIPAA “Authorization”?

The core elements of a valid authorization include (Privacy Rule, 45 C.F.R. §164.508(c)(1)):

  1. A meaningful description of the information to be disclosed
  2. The name of the entity(s) or individual(s) authorized to make the requested disclosure (UVM Medical Center)
  3. The name or other identification of the recipient(s) of the information (UVM, Sponsor, Agencies that regulate research)
  4. A description of the purpose of the disclosure (how it will be used for THIS study – not unspecified future research)
  5. An expiration date or an expiration event that relates to the individual (“end of the research study" or "this authorization does not expire" are permissible for research)
  6. A signature of the individual or their personal representative (someone authorized to make health care decisions on behalf of the individual) and the date.

D. What statements are required to be included in the HIPAA “Authorization”?

Authorization Required Statements (Privacy Rule, 45 C.F.R. § 164.508(c)(2)):

  1. The individual's right to revoke his/her Authorization in writing and the exceptions to the right to revoke and a description of how the individual may revoke Authorization.
  2. Notice of the covered entity's ability or inability to condition treatment, payment, enrollment, or eligibility for benefits on the Authorization, including research-related treatment, and, if applicable, consequences of refusing to sign the Authorization.
  3. The potential for the PHI to be re-disclosed by the recipient and no longer protected by the Privacy Rule. This statement does not require an analysis of risk for re-disclosure but may be a general statement that the Privacy Rule may no longer protect health information.

E. When does a researcher need to “account for disclosures”?

HIPAA allows for individuals to request an account of certain “disclosures” made by a covered entity. In the context of research, any disclosure made pursuant to a waiver of HIPAA authorization would need to be accounted for.  A “disclosure” is when a covered entity is providing or communicating PHI outside of its workforce (NOTE: UVM employees and faculty who have been credentialed are considered members of the UVM Medical Center workforce as well as faculty and students who are listed as personnel on an IRB protocol and acting under supervision of a UVM Medical Center PI).  If a researcher from another institution (UVM, for example) will receive UVM Medical Center PHI, that person’s accessing or viewing of the PHI will generally be a disclosure – this can be for purposes of recruitment or conducting research.  Contact the UVM Medical Center Privacy Office with questions.

F. What are the required statements in a HIPAA “Alteration”?

Any of the requirements of a written HIPAA Authorization (See above or 45 CFR 164.508) can be altered or waived by the IRB if the research meets the criteria for waiver or alteration.  The most frequent “alteration” is for verbal HIPAA Authorization when the IRB has also waived the requirement for written consent under 45 CFR 46.117(c)(2). Demonstrating that the "research could not practicably be conducted without the waiver or alteration" is the main obstacle to approving an alteration. If the subject is physically present, it is usually practicable to obtain written HIPAA Authorization.  If the documentation of consent has been waived by the IRB and verbal consent will be obtained, verbal HIPAA Authorization should also be obtained.

G. What is the difference between a “Partial Waiver of Authorization” and an “Alteration”?

A Partial Waiver of Authorization is when HIPAA authorization to use and disclose PHI is waived for just part of the research.  For example, a Partial Waiver may be appropriate to allow a researcher to obtain PHI as necessary to recruit potential research subjects.  Once a subject is recruited, he or she would be asked to sign a HIPAA Authorization for purposes of the research study. An Alteration would be used where a study team is requesting that one of the required Authorization elements (a patient signature, for example) be removed.

H. When is data considered “De-identified”?

Data is considered to be “de-identified” when all 18 HIPAA identifiers (see table below) have been removed and the researcher has no actual knowledge that the remaining information could be used in combination with other publicly available information to identify a particular patient. Please note that Dates of Service and MRNs are considered identifiers.

Elements for De-Identification for Protected Health Information
18 HIPAA Identifiers

(A) Names

(B) All geographic subdivisions smaller than a state, including street address, city, county, precinct, ZIP code, and their equivalent geocodes, except for the initial three digits of the ZIP code if, according to the current publicly available data from the Bureau of the Census:
(1) The geographic unit formed by combining all ZIP codes with the same three initial digits contains more than 20,000 people; and
(2) The initial three digits of a ZIP code for all such geographic units containing 20,000 or fewer people is changed to 000

(C) All elements of dates (except year) for dates that are directly related to an individual, including birth date, admission date, discharge date, death date, and all ages over 89 and all elements of dates (including year) indicative of such age, except that such ages and elements may be aggregated into a single category of age 90 or older

(D) Telephone numbers

(E) Fax numbers

(F) Email addresses

(G) Social security numbers

(H) Medical record numbers

(I) Health plan beneficiary numbers

(J) Account numbers

(K) Certificate/license numbers

(L) Vehicle identifiers and serial numbers, including license plate numbers

(M) Device identifiers and serial numbers

(N) Web Universal Resource Locators (URLs)

(O) Internet Protocol (IP) addresses

(P) Biometric identifiers, including finger and voice prints

(Q) Full-face photographs and any comparable images

(R) Any other unique identifying number, characteristic, or code, except a code or other means of record identification that allows information de-identified to be re-identified by the covered entity, provided that:

a. The code or other means of record identification is not derived from or related to information about the individual and is not otherwise capable of being translated so as to identify the individual; and

b. The code or other means of record identification is not used or disclosed for any other purpose, and does not disclose the mechanism for re-identification.

And

No actual knowledge exists that the information could be used alone or in combination with other information to identify an individual who is a subject of the information.

 

UVMClick - Obtaining a UVM Net ID & Password

computer_keyboard-2

A UVM NetID is needed to log into UVMClick to view or submit protocol materials.

The UVM Network ID should be 8 characters or less (opens in a new window).

If you experience problems with logging into UVMClick, it is likely that your password has expired.

Please go to UVM's Account Management page (opens in a new window) for directions on how to reset your password.

If you are still experiencing problems, contact rpo@uvm.edu or call 656-5040.

For Non-UVM Personnel Only

All UVM students, faculty and staff are issued a UVM NetID, but there are many UVMMC (non-UVM) research key personnel who do not have a UVM NetID. A UVM NetID can be issued to UVMMC personnel for the purposes of access to the UVMClick system through a special process. If you do not have a UVM Net ID, complete and submit the Microsoft Office document icon Request for UVM Net ID form (DOC) in order to gain access to UVMClick.

We track approximately 2800 people through our training program of which 900 are UVMMC. During a recent audit, we found that many UVMMC people appear to be inactive and some UVMMC key personnel, after having been assigned a UVM NetID, neglected to follow through with their training and were never added to a protocol. To keep our database clean, we are placing a limit of 30 days after UVM NetID assignment to allow time for people to complete their training and be added to a protocol. We will also be deactivating UVM NetIDs for any persons who appear to be inactive. A UVM NetID can always be reactivated if necessary.

For UVM Students, Faculty and Staff Only

All UVM students, faculty and staff are issued a UVM NetID.

If you are a UVM Student conducting Research, then you will need to go to the Directory to update your information to be added to UVMClick. It may take up to 24 hours for the profile to become available in UVMClick. The instructions can be found in the "User Guides" table as "Students - How to Sign Up to Do Research at UVM."

As with any password, you must reset the password that is associated with your UVM NetID on an annual basis. UVM does send a notice of impending expiration, however, this notice goes to a uvm.edu address. To avoid password expiration you can choose to have the new UVM email forwarded to another UVM related email such as a med.uvm.edu address. For more information about email forwarding, visit the UVM TECH TE@M.