Be active

students smiling
students studying
Engaging classroom lectures
Classroom learning

The Gender, Sexuality and Women's Studies Program (GSWS) offers a unique and wide-ranging way of studying and engaging with the world. We study concepts such as sex, gender, and sexuality; identities such as female, male, gay, lesbian, bisexual, trans, and queer; the intersections of these identities with race, class, (dis)ability and other kinds of differences among people; and academic subjects including women's history, the sociology of the family, race and gender in urban space, queer theory, sex and politics, and biological approaches to sex and gender. GSWS is both an academic discipline and a meeting place for students and faculty in every discipline who want to explore these critically important issues. The program is scholarly, and it is fully engaged with the world in which we live.

Beyond the classroom

women studies panelAt UVM, you’ll find many places where discussions about race and gender refine and reflect your intellectual experience in the classroom. Organizations like the UVM Women’s Center, which raises awareness about the critical issues facing women, and the Center for Cultural Pluralism (CCP), which equips us with the cultural and social justice competencies necessary to function at our best, encourage conversation and collaboration.

The Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, Transgender, Queer/Questioning, and Advocate (LGBTQA) Center serves a diverse queer and trans community at UVM, and is committed to creating a more socially just, equitable, and inclusive campus.

The Mosaic Center for Students of Color (MCSC) also serves as an active and inclusive community African, Latino(a), Asian, Native American, Multiracial and New American students. MCSC so that as confident students of color they attain their goals for academic achievement, personal growth, and cultural development.

You'll find many other opportunities outside the classroom to connect with other students, get involved as campus educators and advocates, and deepen your commitment to diversity and cultural understanding.

Careers

  • Advocate for domestic violence survivors
  • Attorney
  • Counselor
  • Journalist
  • Psychotherapist
  • Social worker
  • Policy analyst
  • Teacher
  • Union organizer
  • University professor

Where alumni work

  • American Academy of Pediatrics
  • Change Media Group
  • Holman Immigration Law
  • Jitegemee, Inc.
  • Pennsylvania Ballet Academy
  • Steps to Success, Brookline
  • Vermont Association of Business, Industry & Rehabilitation

Graduate Schools

  • American University
  • Linköpings Universitet
  • University of New Hampshire
  • University of Pennsylvania

Related Information

Minors

Gender, Sexuality, and Women's Studies Undergraduate Minor

The requirements for the minor:

  • A total of eighteen credits (six courses) are required for the minor. (a) Core (nine credits): GSWS 001, 100, and 200 (b) Electives (nine credits): at least six hours must be taken at the 100-level or above. No more than three credit hours may come from the following courses: GSWS 191, GSWS 192, GSWS 297, and GSWS 298. No more than three credit hours may come from classes also used to fulfill a major.

Sexuality and Gender Identity Studies Undergraduate Minor

The requirements for the minor:

  • A total of eighteen credits (six courses) are required for the minor. (a) Core (nine credits): GSWS 001, 105, and one 200-level course approved for SGIS credit. (b) Electives (nine credits):  at least six hours must be taken at the 100-level or above.  No more than three credit hours may come from the following courses: GSWS 191, GSWS 192, GSWS 297,  and GSWS 298.  No more than three credit hours may come from classes also used to fulfill a major.

 

Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of the GSWS BA degree, students will be able to:

  1. Understand gender and sexuality as systems of power intersecting with others such as race, class, and ability.
  2.  Learn and apply the history, theory and methodologies of the study of gender, sexuality and women.
  3.  Demonstrate rhetorical discretion in the expression of the results of their learning so as to communicate effectively in spoken, written, and/or creative work.
  4. Navigate the ethical connections between the academic study of GSWS and the non-academic world of everyday experience.