Strands are mini-courses that occur each morning for 2-3 hours. Institute participants attend one strand throughout the four mornings. For information on an individual strand, click on the title of the strand. Please indicate your first, second, and third strand choices on the Individual Registration Form.

The strands marked as "VTPBIS School Teams Only" are designed for school teams (not individuals) that have completed certain PBIS readiness activities prior to the Institute.

The strands marked as "Strand Open to Anyone" are designed for individuals or school teams and generally do not have pre-requisites.

The strands marked as "School Teams Only" are designed for school teams (not individuals); and generally do not have pre-requisites unless otherwise specified.

It is important for your school team to carefully plan how each participant's strand choice will contribute to your team's overall implementation strategies that will be discussed during afternoon Team Time.

To view strand presenter videos, click here.

Strands to be registered for by Eligible VTPBIS School Teams ONLY

CANCELLED! Strand A - VTPBIS Universal Training

CANCELLED!!

Presenters: VTPBIS State Team Trainers

Prerequisites:

School teams must have completed these activities (with support from VTPBIS technical assistance provider) to be eligible to attend this training.

Description:

Eligible School Leadership Teams will be supported with content and facilitation needed to complete their PBIS School-wide Implementation Plan within a Multi-tiered System of Supports (MTSS) framework. Restorative principles and equity considerations will be infused in the training. Teams will prepare for PBIS roll-out to staff, students, and family members.

Learning Objectives:

School Leadership Teams will:

• Develop the school-wide systems needed for equitable, fidelity-based PBIS implementation;
• Finalize and define 3-4 positively-stated, culturally responsive school-wide expectations;
• Create lessons for teaching and practicing prosocial behaviors that support the school-wide expectations;
• Establish procedures for acknowledging prosocial behaviors at the individual, classroom, and school-wide levels;
• Develop consistent practices, procedures, and a continuum of supports for preventing and responding instructionally to minor and major behavior concerns;
• Create procedures for making decisions based on data, determine school-wide data collection method, and establish data reporting procedures;
• Plan for the roll-out and first year implementation of PBIS at the Universal Level.

Intended Audience:

• School leadership teams participants should include: principal and/or assistant principal, school PBIS coordinator, Supervisory Union/Supervisory District PBIS coordinator, other representative staff members, and, if possible, student and/or caregiver/parent/guardian representative(s).
• Wondering if this strand is for you? Contact Amy Wheeler-Sutton at amy.wheeler-sutton@uvm.edu.

Materials:

Available June 6th

Strand B - VTPBIS Targeted Training

Presenters: VTPBIS State Team Trainers

Prerequisites:

• School is implementing PBIS at the Universal Level and has achieved a score of at least 70% on the Tiered Fidelity Inventory (TFI) Tier 1 (items 1.1-1.15) within the past four months
• School leadership team must complete these activities.

Description:

The Targeted Training will support school teams in building and implementing (or refreshing) a system of Targeted supports based on strong Universal foundations. Teams will leave the training ready to implement Check-in/Check-out and/or Teacher Check, Connect, and Expect, and will have been introduced to other Targeted supports that can be implemented in the future. Restorative principles and equity considerations will be infused throughout the training.

Learning Objectives:

School Leadership Teams will:

• Increase knowledge and fluency about PBIS at the Targeted level of PBIS;
• Finalize systems needed at the Targeted level;
• Develop criteria and procedures for providing Targeted supports, with a primary focus on Check-in/Check-out and Teacher Check, Connect, and Expect;
• Establish how Targeted supports will provide increased instruction, feedback, and home communication;
• Develop a foundational understanding of Functional Behavior Assessment and Universal Screening and create a plan to integrate these into the Targeted level of PBIS;
• Explore how data is used to identify students, monitor progress, and evaluate implementation;
• Consider how to center equity by ensuring access, representation, meaningful participation, and high outcomes;
• Determine format/s and content for staff training and information about Targeted foundations and implementation specifics;
• Plan for roll-out of PBIS at the Targeted level.

Intended Audience:

• School leadership team participants should include: principal and/or assistant principal, school PBIS coordinator, Supervisory Union/Supervisory District PBIS coordinator, classroom teacher/s, staff member who is likely to provide Check-in/Check-out support, other representative staff members, and, if possible, caregiver/parent/guardian representative.
• This training is also appropriate for Teams who previously attended this training and who want a Targeted refresher training.
• Wondering if this strand is for you? Contact Amy Wheeler-Sutton at amy.wheeler-sutton@uvm.edu.

The following will be handed out at the Institute (one per team):

Responding to Problem Behavior in Schools : The Behavior Education Program
by Leanne S. Hawken, Deanne A. Crone, Robert H. Horner

Materials:

Available June 6th

Strand C - VTPBIS Intensive Training

Presenters: VTPBIS State Team Trainers

Prerequisites:

• School is implementing PBIS at the Universal and Targeted Level, with well-established Check-in/Check-out and/or Teacher Check, Connect, and Expect supports in place
• School has completed the Tiered Fidelity Inventory (TFI), Tiers I & II (items 1.1-2.13) and  has achieved a score of at least 70% on Tier I (items 1.1-1.15) within the past four months
• School leadership teams must complete these activities.

Description:

The Intensive Training will support school teams in building and implementing (or refreshing)  a system of Intensive supports based on strong Universal and Targeted foundations. Restorative principles and equity considerations will be infused throughout the training.

Learning Objectives:

School Leadership teams will:

• Refine and strengthen an Inventory of Targeted practices that can be adapted for individualized supports;
• Increase knowledge and fluency about the Intensive Level of VTPBIS with a restorative approach lens;
• Identify the systems functions, responsibilities, and roles at the Intensive Level;
• Understand the features of individualized supports, including:

o Teaming
o Setting Goals
o Assessment
o Intervention(s)
o Evaluation

• Intentionally explore ways to involve students and their family members meaningfully in goal-setting and intervention design;
• Develop strategies for building effective Behavior Support Plans;
• Explore the data systems needed to facilitate effective Behavior Support Plans; and
• Plan for the roll-out of the Intensive level that supports equitable access to all students.

Intended Audience:

• School leadership team participants should include: the principal and/or assistant principal, school PBIS coordinator, Supervisory Union/Supervisory District PBIS coordinator, special educator/s, classroom teacher/s, staff member trained in FBA, other representative staff members, and, if possible, caregiver/parent/guardian representative
• This training is also appropriate for Teams who previously attended this training and who want an Intensive refresher training.
• Wondering if this strand is for you? Contact Amy Wheeler-Sutton at amy.wheeler-sutton@uvm.edu.

Materials:

Available June 6th

Strand D - Refreshing, Enhancing, and Deepening Universal PBIS Implementation

Presenters: VTPBIS State Team Trainers

Prerequisites (completed with TA support):

 

  • School is implementing PBIS at the Universal Level
  • For schools previously trained in PBIS that are no longer implementing PBIS, please contact your State TA to determine if this strand is the best option for your school.
  • School leadership team must complete these activities.

Description:

This strand will provide opportunities for schools at any level of PBIS implementation to explore ways to strengthen their Universal implementation. Teams will take a deep dive into implementation strengths and needs in the areas of equity and cultural responsiveness, student and family voice, systems, and practices in each of the Universal core components: revisiting purpose; defining and refining expectations; teaching, practicing, and acknowledging prosocial behavior; preventing and responding instructionally to concerning behavior through a continuum of supports; and making decisions based on data.

This strand will differentiate content and activities based on individual school needs and school data. Schools may choose to attend in order to address needs including: deepening an already established Universal implementation; ensuring equity and cultural responsiveness; increasing  implementation fidelity; building momentum and staff skill and commitment; responding to staff and/or administrator turnover; expanding/strengthening practices; refining systems; using data more effectively; and/or keeping up to date with PBIS best practices. Schools that have not trained at Universal for some time, that have not been able to access coaching, or that began implementing during the pandemic are especially encouraged to attend.

Learning Objectives:

School leadership teams will:

• Identify, examine, and respond to their school’s particular implementation needs;
• Refine school-wide systems, practices, and data-based decision-making processes needed for equitable, fidelity-based PBIS implementation and improved student outcomes;
• Identify and make a plan to address equity and cultural responsiveness needs;
• Explore ways to support staff around preventing and responding instructionally to concerning behaviors;
• Design a system for training and supporting new and returning staff in implementing PBIS with fidelity;
• Develop a 3-year action plan for implementation growth and professional development.

Intended Audience:

• School leadership team participants should include: principal or assistant principal, school PBIS coordinator, Supervisory Union/School District PBIS coordinator, other representative staff members, and, if possible, student and/or caregiver/parent/guardian representative(s).
• Wondering if this strand is for you? Contact Amy Wheeler-Sutton at amy.wheeler-sutton@uvm.edu.

Materials:

Available June 6th

Strand E - Expanding and Enhancing Targeted Interventions for Social and Academic Success

Presenters: VTPBIS State Trainers

Description:

In this strand, participants will explore how to broaden and enhance targeted interventions. Designed with a PBIS framework in mind, but accessible within any framework, participants and teams will learn to keep universal strategies paramount while tightening up, enhancing, and developing new targeted interventions that build upon Universal practices. Primary goals include moving beyond "check-in/check- out,” using a function-based lens for matching interventions to student needs, and learning strategies for efficient group interventions to avoid the potential pitfalls of "universally individualized" interventions. Several classroom and school-wide examples will be provided.

Learning Objectives:
School Leadership teams will:

• Expand current thinking about student needs and how to meet them;
• Strengthen and enhance your school's inventory of targeted interventions;
• Identify methods to collect and use data to monitor progress and make decisions about duration, modification, and fading;
• Hear examples from multiple Vermont schools; and
• Plan a process for supporting staff to implement targeted interventions with fidelity.

Intended Audience:

Teams consisting of PBIS Targeted coordinator/members, EST members, school counselors, special educators, administrators, other representative staff members, and,  if possible, student and/or caregiver/parent/guardian representative(s).

Materials:

Available June 6th

Strands for Anyone (Individuals or Teams)

Strand F - Everyday Equity: Achieving Equity in Your School Every Day in Every Way

Presenters: Dr. Sharla Horton-Williams and Dr. Toni Harrison-Kelly

Co-Founders/Partners of the SLSJ/Horton Kelly Company School Leadership for Social Justice

Description:

Everyday Equity: Achieving Equity in Your School Every Day in Every Way will approach equity from the inside out, beginning with simple identity work to help participants identify what influences how they interact with others. Through various interactive activities, participants will learn practical ways to apply the concept of equity to school discipline, teaching and learning, family engagement, and the school culture/physical environment.

Learning Objectives:

  1. Understand and apply concepts such as equity, racial consciousness, racial humility, racial identity, unconscious bias, and deficit mindset to their personal and professional lived experiences
  2. Learn the basic steps of conducting their informal equity audit to inform school/organizational choices and;
  3. Develop an action plan for applying their learning to their current professional context.

Intended Audience:

All educators and school professionals are welcome, and no prior training is required. We welcome individuals and teams. This strand is appropriate for all learning levels and serves students at every grade.

To hear from the presenter, click here.

Materials:

Available June 6th

Bios:
Dr. Toni Harrison-Kelly is a fifteen-year master teaching veteran and education consultant, having worked with a variety of community partners and trained over 1,300 parents and teachers to date. Dr. Harrison-Kelly earned her Doctor of Education in Curriculum and Instruction degree from Texas A&M University. She is also the Co-Founder of School Leadership for Social Justice (www.SLSJ.us), an equity firm focused on changing the story for students and for society. She currently leads the collaborative community involvement efforts of Southern Methodist University as the Executive Director of the The Budd Center at Simmons College of Education and Human Development.

Dr. Sharla Horton-Williams has a 20-year career in early childhood and PK-12 education and is committed to achieving educational excellence and equity for all students - especially Black and Hispanic students who have historically been underserved in education. She has served as a teacher, assistant principal, and principal in private, public charter, and traditional public schools. Sharla earned a doctorate in curriculum and instruction from Texas A&M University.  Currently, Sharla is leading the collaborative academic recovery efforts to support 150,000 students across three Dallas-area districts.

Strand G - The More You Feel it, the Better You Teach it

Presenter: Ali Hearn

Description:

While Social Emotional Learning (SEL) has been a buzz-phrase for some time, the stage is now set for the world to be listening to what we have to say. The truth is that it's what we do that will speak louder than any words we can use. Join us for four days of diving deep into the heart side of the triangle to experience SEL on a deep level, to consider its alignment to PBIS, RP, etc., and to action plan around steps for harnessing this important work at the building/district level to help facilitate improved outcomes for students and staff.

Learning Objectives:

• Deepen personal understanding of the Social/Emotional Learning (SEL) competencies by exploring aspects of each competency through experiential learning;
• Gain strategies for helping build and strengthen the SEL competencies in students and staff;
• Explore ways in which PBIS, Restorative Practices, and SEL all work together to support the social/emotional/behavioral/mental health needs of our students and staff;
• Leave with action steps toward strengthening implementation in your own settings.

This session will serve as a reminder to educators about why we got into this field in the first place, it will shed light on the realities of what we are facing in education, and it will empower participants to know they can still be the educators they want to be and positively impact our youth even through these challenging times.

Intended Audience:

This session is designed for individuals and/or teams new or experienced with the heart side of the triangle who are looking to lift themselves up right now, as well as lift up Social/Emotional/Behavioral/Mental Health work in their school/district.

To hear from the presenter, click here.

Materials:

Available June 6th

Bio:

Ali Hearn, LCSW is a national keynote speaker, trainer, and coach whose mission is to shift mindsets and ignite fires within others to create sustainable change and impact. Throughout her career she has worked with thousands of educators across the country, emphasizing the importance of improving social/emotional skills, promoting the installation of Restorative Practices within school systems, and reinforcing MTSS frameworks to better support the current needs of students, staff, and families. Ali’s diverse experiences as a school-based social worker first sparked her passion for working with people, and her years working with the Midwest PBIS Network in partnership with the National Center on PBIS, honed her skills in strengthening school systems and culture to positively impact social, emotional, and academic outcomes.

Ali’s balance of energy, humor, candor, and heart not only inspires educators to want to make schools better, but empowers them to know they can. Her unique style and approach make her a sought after leader in educational spaces and a dynamic catalyst for change.

Ali received her Bachelor of Fine Arts from the University of Illinois, her Master’s in Social Work from Loyola University in Chicago, is a certified Restorative Practices trainer, and a Licensed Clinical Social Worker. She shares monthly strategies, reflections, and resources with a growing online community through her “SPARKS.” Find her at heyalihearn.com.

CANCELLED! Strand H - The Courage to Teach: Renewing, Reflecting, Remembering

CANCELLED!!

Presenters: Holly Wilkinson and Ally Oswald

Description:

"Teaching is a vocation that requires constant renewal of mind, heart, and spirit - if we want to avoid burnout, take joy in our work, and grow in our service to students. As we seek renewal, there are two primary sources to which we can turn - the inner teacher who speaks in solitude and the community of fellow teachers." ~ Parker J. Palmer, The Courage to Teach: Exploring the Inner Landscape of a Teacher's Life

Avoid burnout, take joy, grow? At a time when we are all focused on survival, joy can seem like a distant galaxy. Yet, courage is what we have been drawing on every day to slow down and make space to be present with all the challenges educators are facing at this time. This strand offers space for you to show up, take space, reflect on what calls you forward with integrity, compassion, and renewal. Through pausing, reflecting, creating space to breathe and be, prompts, and poetry as portals to access our "inner teacher," a sense of renewal is possible.

Working with the principles and practices of Courage and Renewal, strand participants will have space to reconnect with themselves, nourish their own well-being, and cultivate practices of care and listening.  How we show up for ourselves impacts how we are with others in our professional and personal lives.

Learning Objectives:

• Remember what called you to the teaching profession;
• Take space for your own learning edges and core questions;
• Explore ways to address tensions in life-giving ways;
• Develop practices of renewal to take into your summer and the next school year;
• Connect as human beings in these times that require so much doing that stretches thin our human capacity;
• Renew and acknowledge your unique way of knowing and learning.

Are you running low on oxygen? Social and emotional well-being begins with each one of us. Without tending to our own sustainability, we lose sight of our passion and our knowing. Through exploring the questions we are holding, rather than the right answer in these unprecedented times, this strand focuses on you, the teacher, the school leader, the human being. Give yourself the gift of space and time to regain parts of yourself that are hungry, thirsty, and in need of care. How we are is the first aspect of what we do. Learn with teachers who have been practicing and implementing Courage principles in their teaching for years.

Intended Audience:

This strand is for individuals. While teams are welcome, the focus is on personal, social, and emotional well-being.

To hear from the presenter, click here.

Materials:

Available June 6th

Bio:

Holly Wilkinson is a Courage & Renewal facilitator who has been offering Courage to Lead, Courage to Teach and Courage Earth trainings for eight years. She brings thirty years of experience in adult learning, higher education and community engagement.  As Executive Director of WholeHeart Inc, Holly mentors people in the art of listening, personal and professional wellness practices, reflective leadership and relational justice.  She brings grounded, kind energy to open space to tap into multiple ways of knowing in times of stress.  To keep life in perspective, she spends as much time as possible outside, deepening relationships with the many teachers of the land, watershed and sky.

Ally Oswald has been a school counselor in southern Vermont for the past 14 years. She has been an affiliate of the School Reform Initiative since its inception and has facilitated small groups at their annual meeting for the past 10 years. She feels passionate about helping students find their voice and stand up for the things they care about. As a member of the Vermont Courage and Renewal Cohort, she has learned the power of generous listening and asking open and honest questions to create communities of belonging. She is currently attempting to raise 2 healthy teenage boys with her husband, Allan, and is so grateful for the daily lessons of patience and humor they bring.

Strand I - The Pandemic of Burnout in Education: Revolutionizing Well-Being & SEL for Educators to Support our Students and Ourselves

Presenter: Danna Thomas, Happy Teacher Revolution

Description:

The pandemic of COVID-19 is just one of many pandemics facing educators, only adding to the pandemic of social injustice and pandemic of caregiver burnout with more teachers and administrators leaving the profession than ever before. Happy Teacher Revolution is a global initiative founded to support the mental health and well-being of our education professionals. We believe educators deserve the time and space to feel, deal and be real about the social-emotional demands of the job.

Participants in this strand will explore the research, data, and evidence behind a multi-tiered system of support for adults and how supporting the well-being of adults connects to supporting our students. Participants will also discuss topics relating to the social-emotional learning of educators as well as vicarious trauma, caregiver burnout, compassion fatigue, and toxic stress. Finally, participants will have an experiential learning opportunity to share their unique perspectives by participating in a "demo" Happy Teacher Revolution support group meeting. Participants who choose this strand have optional opportunities following the completion of the Institute to connect within the Happy Teacher Revolution global network and/or launching Happy Teacher Revolution support meetings within their own local communities.

Intended Audience:

• Early Childhood Educators
• Elementary Educators
• Middle School Educators
• High School Educators
• Directors of Schools
• Rural Programs
• Central Office Supervisors/Program Directors
• Urban Programs
• Future Educators
• Veteran Educators

To hear from the presenter, click here.

Materials:

Available June 6th

Bio:

Danna Thomas is a former Baltimore City Public School teacher turned founder of a global initiative to support the mental health and wellness of educators. Her organization, Happy Teacher Revolution, is on a mission to increase teacher happiness, retention, and professional sustainability by providing educators with the time and space to heal, deal, and be real about the social-emotional demands they face on the job. Danna served as the national spokeswoman for the National Alliance of Mental Illness (NAMI) Maryland and the “Music for Mental Health” campaign. She is the recipient of the 2019 Johns Hopkins Community Hero Award and the 2019 winner of the Johns Hopkins Social Innovation Lab. Danna’s favorite forms of self-care include reading, community hot yoga, and rocking out on the saxophone.

CANCELLED! Strand J - Youth & Adults Transforming Education Together: Building Understanding and Support for Youth and Adults Working Together as Full Partners in Learning, Wellness, and Change

CANCELLED!!

Presenter: Lindsey Halman, UP for Learning

Description:

Something extraordinary is happening in our society, and UP for Learning is a catalyst. Schools and communities realize EVERY young person deserves and thrives in an educational experience where their voice is truly valued. Education transformation requires a fundamental shift in the student-teacher relationship to one of partnership. When youth work closely with adults toward shared goals, they gain lifelong learning and civic engagement skills and confidence. When adults work closely with youth as partners, the opportunity to learn from their insights and unique perspectives often renews a professional sense of purpose and shifts teaching toward more learner-centered practices. Yet, youth are often overlooked as co-constructors of learning and agents of change in transforming education. During this strand, participants will create action plans to monitor changes in the school culture over time, embedding partnership into the fabric of the educational structure.

Learning Objectives:

• Explore the WHY of Youth-Adult Partnership (YAP);
• Introduce key research findings that support the impact of elevating the voices and roles of students within the educational process;
• Develop skills to envision a new destination in how youth and adults interact;
• Identify key variables of this evolving relationship when it is done with fidelity, and explore the steps along the way as touchstones;
• Create a new consciousness within their group or greater community about the core qualities of partnership;
• Surface stereotypes and barriers to partnership can help protect the authenticity of the YAP relationship and open up new areas of personal and group goal-setting;
• Assess where a school-wide system resides along the YAP continuum of growth
• Identify group goals and means to assess if these goals have been reached;
• Develop concrete steps and an action plan that can be taken to increase YAP in their school community.

Intended Audience:

Upper elementary, middle, and high school educators. While having youth attend would be ideal, UP will facilitate this strand with adults as the target audience, hoping that students will be brought into the work during the school year.

Materials:

Available June 6th

Bio:

Lindsey Halman is the Executive Director of UP for Learning. She is committed to exploring radically inclusive education and multiple ways of knowing. She believes there is no more compelling time than right now to ask, "how do I meet this moment with courage, vulnerability, and creativity?" She joined the UP team in 2018 after 15 years as a middle level educator, leader and advocate. Prior to joining UP, she co-founded The Edge Academy at Essex Middle School. The Edge Academy served as a model and learning laboratory for many educators throughout Vermont, and beyond. The Edge integrated education for sustainability, as well as the arts, into all aspects of the team and curriculum. At the Edge Academy, there was a strong focus on youth voice, social justice, student-centered learning, project-based learning, and negotiated curriculum. Lindsey is passionate about building strong relationships with youth and adults, helping them feel empowered to make change, and creating a socially just climate and culture for all. She is currently past-president and a board member of VAMLE (Vermont Association for Middle Level Education), coordinating the Vermont Restorative Approaches Collaborative, and is amember of the Community Advisory Board/RJ Panel Volunteer for the Essex Community Justice Center. In addition, she has served as adjunct faculty at Saint Michael’s College, Colchester, Vermont, where she taught middle level education courses to pre and inservice educators. When not rigorously pursuing social change in education, she can be found spending time with her family, taking dance classes, gardening, dreaming about flowers, reading, and loving the outdoor activities that every season brings to Vermont.

Maisie Franke (she/her) joined UP for Learning in the spring of 2020. She is a junior and student school board representative at Harwood Union High School. She is looking forward to this year when she has the opportunity to co-teach a leadership class at her school that prioritizes student voice and dialogue based learning. She hopes to use this class as a venue to have conversations around racism and our education system, two topics she’s passionate about along with climate change and the environment. She joined UP as a youth facilitator with Cultivating Pathways to Sustainability and is continuing that work this year along with being the youth board member, and a Youth Advisory Council (YAC) co-chair. Maisie strongly believes in the power of youth adult partnership and is working towards bringing those ideas into other aspects of her life. Maisie loves to ski and spends as much time as she can out in the wilderness exploring new trails and searching for fresh powder with friends, teammates, and family. She runs cross-country in the fall and is excited to be a nordic captain this winter!
 

Ana Lindert-Boyes (she/her) is a senior at Twinfield Union School and is enrolled in the Early College program at Goddard College in Plainfield. At Twinfield, she has been actively involved in advocating for education reform, youth activism, and antiracism as a representative on the School Board, a member of their Student Voice group, Equity team, and more. This year, she is excited to be co-teaching a class centered around examining equity through a restorative practices lens. First as a participant of Transforming School Culture Through Restorative Practices, then later as a co-facilitator, Ana has been working with UP since her freshman year. During her time as a youth partner, she has become a member of UP’s Youth Advisory Council, connected with Vermont Learning for the Future, and planned and facilitated in a number of different contexts, including the Power 2 summit for several years. In her free time, both playing and listening to music bring her joy, as well as reading, writing, and traveling.

FULL! - Strand K - Holistic Restorative Education—Supporting Both Adults and Youth to Thrive

FULL!!

Presenter: Annie O’Shaughnessy with guest speaker Howard Moody

Description:

Restorative Practices (RP) first came to schools over 30 years ago as an alternative way to respond to harm that was relational, non-exclusionary, and based in a dedication to healing and growth instead of punishment and shame. Research has linked RP with improved school climate, greater school connectedness, increased student attendance, improved test scores, increased graduation rates, reduced discipline referrals, reductions in violent and serious incidents, and decreases in punitive and exclusionary discipline responses. As the field has evolved, emphasis has shifted on how to use the principles of restorative approaches to transform climate and culture so that less harm happens, students and adults are more engaged in learning and more willing and able to participate in difficult conversations. From this shift a new field has been born—Holistic Restorative Education (HRE).

In this strand you will receive an introduction to RP as well as explore and practice the ways that RP, trauma informed practices, mindfulness, SEL and equity all weave together to build and strengthen the skill, motivation and capacity for all members of a school community to thrive. This approach recognizes that educators cannot meet their students’ needs well if their own needs are not being met, and therefore, seeks to change systems and practices that are more human-centered and support the needs of everyone. During our time together participants will learn practical ways to create a powerful shift in school culture, increase engagement, collaboration, and active responsibility.

While not an exhaustive training in all aspects of HRE, this strand intends to position participants to lead restorative change in the schools and/or classrooms where they work. Both the presenter and co-presenter are skilled in creating dynamic, fun and interactive learning environments where you will have many opportunities to apply your learning.

Learning Objectives:

• Explore the restorative principles and assess your own practice and mindset;
• Examine the Balance in the Process framework and explore ways educators can apply it in their milieus;
• Examine Affect Theory and Compass of Shame and how it impacts learning/teaching;
• Name our primary learning needs and name/develop holistic restorative strategies to meet those needs;
• Examine the idea of “relational ballast” and its impact on the capacity, skill and motivation needed to develop active responsibility in learning, meaningful engagement with educational community, and agency in naming, acknowledging and repairing harm;
• Explore the role of the instructor’s mindful awareness, understanding and intention in developing an equity-centered and restorative classroom;
• Examine and practice the circle process as it applies to community building, norm setting, check-in, issue addressing and instruction;
• Explore a coaching model for shifting the way we talk to kids and each other, review and practice restorative communication with a trauma-informed perspective;
• Review the “why” and “what” of RP;
• Define RP in your own words and in a way that is relevant for school staff, students, and your community—answering the question “Why RP in our school?”;
• Review what RP looks like in action in schools and assess your own school’s assets, readiness, and needs related to the possible implementation of RA;
• Examine different models for implementing RP from VT schools and beyond, and assess which might be the best fit for your school;
• Use implementation strategies to map out some next steps and consider the use of outcome and fidelity measures to assess progress;
• Share your vision for integrating RP in your classroom or school and hear from others to develop a network of support.

Intended Audience:

This strand is recommended not only for educators who desire a comprehensive introduction to restorative practices and principles in order to lead school change, but also for teachers who wish to use the restorative approach to transform their own classrooms and how it feels to be a teacher. No prior experience is needed. Those familiar with use of the restorative approach will have ample opportunities to share their experience and develop a deeper understanding.

To hear from the presenter, click here.

Materials:

Available June 6th

Bio:

Annie O’Shaughnessy began sharing circle practices in the early 2000s by leading retreats around the country.  It was during these extended circle experiences that she developed a deep, experiential understanding of how mindful presence, empathy, and understanding expanded and strengthened during circles, working to create the conditions for authenticity, healing, and restoration. After taking a break from teaching, she came back to discover that this mindful presence and the circle practice were powerful allies when working with youth in schools—building the classroom skill, capacity and motivation to actively engage in learning and name, acknowledge and repair harm. In 2017 she received her Masters in Mindfulness for Educators focusing on the interdependence of Mindfulness, Restorative Practices, Equity and Trauma Informed Practices. When colleagues asked her to share what she was doing in her classroom that made students want to be there, she agreed. Leading workshops, seminars, and courses for educators, she eventually started the  graduate certificate program in Holistic Restorative Education at Saint Michael's College.  A deep love for teachers and students and faith in the inherent goodness of our true nature drives her work. She currently serves locally and nationally as lead consultant of True Nature Teaching in Vermont, coordinator and instructor of the Holistic Restorative Education Certification Program at Saint Michael’s College, and co-founder of Partners in Restorative Change and more.

Strand L - Fostering Resilience to Address Stress, Adversity, and Trauma

Presenter: Joelle van Lent

Description:

In the face of the COVID-19 pandemic, we used our pre-existing wisdom to navigate the pandemic, and then we learned so much more than we could have imagined about resilience. The exceptional challenge and complexity of the past two years have led to a mastery of concepts related to trauma and resilience. We are in an exciting time where discussion of topics like adversity, mental health, and systemic inequities occurs regularly and across all grade levels and are widely viewed to be relevant topics to every member of our community. Our remarkable response to this unprecedented time is cause for celebration and reflection. The end of the school year allows us an opportunity to pause and consolidate what we have learned and set an intentional course forward. This strand will offer a framework for participants to process their experiences, consolidate their learning, and plan their professional path forward. Their experiences are integrated wisely into a resilient stance that recognizes how we are impacted.

Learning Objectives:

  1. Participants will be grounded in the key concepts of how various types of stress, adversity, and trauma impact child development and the well-being of the helping professional.
  2. Participants will be encouraged to replace an overemphasis on self-care as the answer to compassion fatigue with the more sophisticated concepts of community care, allostatic load, and finding hope through action.
  3. Participants will develop an action plan to support their professional resilience, engagement, and motivation.
  4. Participants will learn practical strategies to support students of all grade levels in gaining social-emotional skills through organized play and healthy activity promoting healthy relationships, belonging, and intrinsic motivation.

This strand will directly apply the key concepts of fostering resilience to support the participants in effectively processing their experiences working in education for two years during a pandemic. This will be accomplished by providing information on the stress response system to increase awareness and provide validation, relief, and reassurance that much of what was felt and noticed was in fact, a healthy response to adversity. Once this validation is accomplished, participants will be well-positioned to begin to integrate their experiences into a framework for themselves and their students that encourages a rekindling of hope through action. Much of what is needed is well within our skillset, and participants will re-discover what brought them to this field initially and re-commit to a forward direction that honors impact and bolsters passion. The learning approach will include examples, group discussion, visuals, video clips, and interactive learning opportunities.

Intended Audience:

All educators and school professionals are welcome, and no prior training is required. This strand is appropriate for both those who are relatively new to this topic and those who have developed more advanced expertise. The information will be relevant to preschool through grade 12, and examples provided for this full range.

To hear from the presenter, click here.

Materials:

Available June 6th

Bio:

Dr. Joelle van Lent is a licensed psychologist with over 20 years of experience working with children, families, and child serving agencies. Dr. van Lent has expertise as a therapist, clinician, evaluator, consultant, and trainer. Her work focuses on child and adolescent mental health, family therapy, trauma, and Autism Spectrum Disorder. Dr. van Lent’s approach is geared toward fostering resilience and creating communities that support healthy development. She is currently in private practice based in the northwestern part of Vermont and works across the state with schools and agencies.

Strand M - Creating Safe and Nurturing Classroom Environments

Presenter: Brandi Simonsen, University of Connecticut

Description:

In this strand, participants will:

• Learn how to implement and differentiate core features of effective, research-based classroom practices to create safe and nurturing classroom environments that support all students’ social, emotional, behavioral, and academic growth;
• Consider we can develop habits of effective practices;
• Draft an action plan to develop habits of effective practices; and
• Consider data and systems features needed to scale habits of effective practice.

Learning Objectives:

Specifically, after attending this strand, participants will be able to:

  1. Describe the core features of effective classroom practices to support all students and provide examples appropriate to their school context (e.g., grade level, ability level).
  2. Discuss how we develop habits, and create an action plan to develop habits of effective classroom practices.
  3. Identify data and systems features needed to scale habits of effective classroom practices.

Intended Audience:

Classroom teachers who want to improve their use of positive and proactive classroom practices to create nurturing environments. While not required, it is recommended that individuals attend as a team with someone else from their school.

To hear from the presenter, click here.

Materials:

Available June 6th

Bio:

Brandi Simonsen, PhD is a professor of Special Education and the Co-Director of the Center for Behavioral Education and Research (CBER; www.cber.org) at the University of Connecticut. She is also the Co-Director of the National Technical Assistance Center on Positive Behavior Interventions and Supports (PBIS; www.pbis.org), Co-Principal Investigator of the National Multi-Tiered System of Supports Research Network (www.mtss.org), and a Senior Advisor to the National Center on Intensive Interventions (intensiveintervention.org).

  1.  

CANCELLED! Strand N - Foundational Skills Of Life Space Crisis Intervention (LSCI) - Part One

CANCELLED!!

Presenter: Ken Kramberg

Description:

Life Space Crisis Intervention (LSCI) is an internationally recognized, professional training and certification program sponsored by the Life Space Crisis Intervention Institute of Hagerstown, Maryland. This strand will focus on the foundation skills of Life Space Crisis Intervention which includes de-escalation skills, trauma-informed care, relationship building, and interviewing skills that help administrators, counselors, and teachers establish effective helping relationships with children with self-defeating patterns of behavior and with parents. LSCI offers participants strategies for avoiding power struggles and an opportunity to see children with challenging behavior in a more positive light. Schools will find this a powerful and valuable tool for working with children whose needs fall in the targeted and intensive range.

This strand (Part One) will cover the first two day’s content of the five-day LSCI certification training. Interested participants will have an opportunity to join a three-day equivalent, Part Two LSCI training during the 2022/23 school year to complete the certification training.

Learning Objectives:

• Learn about the six stages of the Life Space Crisis Intervention process;
• Help young people who act out in stress, sparking explosive and endless power struggles using the Red Flag intervention;
• Explore strategies to help young people who make poor decisions based on distorted perceptions & thoughts, using the Reality Rub intervention.

Intended Audience:

Appropriate for teams and individuals, those who have participated in the one-day or half-day introductory de-escalation and relationship-building workshops, as well as those with no prior exposure to LSCI.

To hear from the presenter, click here.

Materials:

Available June 6th

Please note: there will be an extra $50 charge for materials for this strand

Bio:

Ken Kramberg is a founding member of the Vermont BEST Project and has been an active member since 1995. He is also a member of the VTPBIS State Team and provides training and technical assistance at all levels. Ken is one of a few internationally recognized Master Trainers in LSCI. Additionally, Ken is a master trainer in Crisis Prevention and Intervention (CPI) and provides technical support to schools who request assistance around students with significant challenges. Ken has approximately 40 years of experience as a teacher and director of programs for children with challenging behaviors.

CANCELLED! Strand O - CPI: Non-Violent Crisis Prevention Intervention

CANCELLED!!

Presenter: Jeremy Tretiak

Description:

This strand covers ways to recognize and interpret emotional escalation in others, the relationship between our behavioral choices and the responses of others around us, and verbal de-escalation concepts that are universally applicable. Specifically, participants will learn verbal and paraverbal de-escalation strategies, physical disengagement, and safety management principles.

This strand also meets the requirements to certify individuals in CPI Nonviolent Crisis Management. There will be a small materials fee (around $30) for the associated CPI participant workbook. Participants attending this training will be certified for one year.

Intended Audience:

This strand is open to all roles, experience, and grade levels

To hear from the presenter, click here.

Materials:

Available June 6th

Please note: there will be an extra $30 charge for materials for this strand

Bio:

Jeremy Tretiak is an Implementation Coach and Trainer for Vermont PBIS. He has been working in the field for 12 years, during which he has been a classroom teacher and worked in both direct service and consultation roles with children, families, and schools. Jeremy earned his BS from St. Lawrence University and an MA in Education from Johnson State College. He has been a Board Certified Behavior Analyst (BCBA) since 2015 and is also a Licensed Behavior Analyst in Vermont. He has extensive experience training and supporting school staff in the theory and implementation of principles and practices of Applied Behavior Analysis and PBIS. He is also a certified instructor for Crisis Prevention Intervention (CPI), with a trauma endorsement.

Strands for School Teams Only

FULL! Strand P - Deepening and Expanding Restorative Practices within a Multi-Tiered System of Supports (Advanced)

FULL!!

Presenter: Jon Kidde

Description:

For over a decade, Vermont schools have been building a multi-tiered system of supports (MTSS) framework for social and academic achievement. The interest in restorative approaches continues to grow nationally and in Vermont schools. A whole-school restorative approach involves principle-based processes and practices that can be applied to help things go right and respond when things go wrong. Through active participation and using the opportunities to apply course content to their schools, upon completion, participants will:

  •     Recall current understanding of restorative approaches and MTSS;
  •     Define restorative practices and MTSS in their own words;
  •     Plan ways to apply restorative approaches with different populations within the school, including adults;
  •     Design and facilitate a Tier I circle process;
  •     Consider fidelity and outcomes measures to assess progress toward goals;
  •     Connect to a community of colleagues who are exploring and working to integrate restorative approaches and MTSS;
  •     Use implementation strategies to develop action steps for integrating restorative principles and practices within a MTSS in the schools where they work.

The pandemic has strained our public education system; it has fatigued and stressed the people in it. There is a need to heal before engaging in meaningful recovery efforts. As such, this year this strand will focus on the following:

  •     Acknowledging the challenges of this year. While we do not want to focus on the negative, acknowledgment that this year is hard  helps people not feel isolated and alone.
  •     Prioritizing relationships among and between both youth and adults and creating the conditions for authentic engagement. This helps to build and rebuild community and increases a sense of belonging.
  •     Recognizing that social and emotional well-being is needed in any space where learning is expected. Addressing social and emotional needs promotes learning.
  •     Acknowledging and sharing wins and successes. This helps build upon what's working and creates hope that we can get through.
  •     Identifying and addressing needs. Establish ways to ask youth and adults about their needs and be responsive to them.

Intended Audience:

All participants should have a foundational knowledge of restorative approaches. Please register with a team of at least 2-3 (preferably including an administrator). This advanced strand is intended for school teams looking to dig deeper into restorative approaches, explore the integration and alignment of a restorative approach within the MTSS framework at the systems level, and build the capacity of their team.

To hear from the presenter, click here.

Bio:

Jon Kidde has been exploring the concepts of restorative justice (RJ) for 20 years and has played a critical role in the conceptualization, application, and enhancement of restorative justice within different contexts—education, justice, and within organizations in several states. Jon is currently an independent consultant focused on restorative justice and school discipline & juvenile justice reform living in Vermont. Jon received an MSW degree from the School of Social Welfare at University of California – Berkeley. He co-authored Restorative Justice: A Working Guide for Our Schools with Rita Alfred during the initial implementation of RJ within Oakland Unified School District. He is a Certified Dialogue Education Teacher.