harebell FIELD BOTANY (PLANT BIOLOGY 109), SUMMER 2014

JUNE 16 TO JULY 10, 9:00 AM TO 12:45 PM

Monday through Thursday for four weeks


 
harebell

2013 PLANT LOG                                                2012 PLANT LOG                                             2011 PLANT LOG

Course Goal: To introduce you to the basic ideas about function and evolution of flowering plants as reflected in their structure and to provide you with the basic skills in technical plant collection and identification.  There will be about 10 field trips.

Schedule: We begin and return to 100 Jeffords Hall, but days we will meet in the field around Burlington

MAPS to MEETING PLACES)

MAP TO PRINGLE HERBARIUM

Instructor: David S. Barrington (dbarring@uvm.edu, 656-0431, 338-0313)

Teaching Assistant:

Text Books:

Magee,  D.  and H. E. Ahles.    1999 or 2008.  Flora of the Northeast.  Univ. Massachusetts Press. ISBN 1-55849-189-9.  (Have copies to loan.)

Newcomb, L.  1977.  Newcomb's Wildflower Guide. Little Brown.  ISBN 0-316-60442-9 (paper)

Additional Handouts:

    Critical Characters  
 
    Prominent Families

Important: buy a handlens that magnifies at least 10x, put it on a string around your neck, and bring it to class EVERY  DAY.   They are available at the UVM bookstore.

Course Goal: To introduce you to the basic ideas about function and evolution of flowering plants as reflected in their structure and to provide you with the basic skills in technical plant collection and identification.  There will be about 10 field trips.

Topical Contents of Lecture and Lab (Detailed Syllabus Here)

1. Morphology of Flowering Plants

Vegetative Features and Serial Homology
Reproductive features and central assumptions of flowering plant evolution

2. Ecology of Pollination and Dispersal
     Pollination Biology - link to the powerpoint
     Dispersal of Fruits and Seeds

3. Taxonomy

Early history of plant naming
Basic botanical nomenclature and the type concept
Morphological Species Concept
Modern Species Concepts

4, Phylogeny and Classification

History of Phylogeny Work on Angiosperms
Principles of phylogenetic inference
Major Groups of Flowering Plants

5. Speciation - link to the powerpoint

 

Laboratory (mostly in the field) Activity

Identification of numerous flowering plants to species using technical and popular identification keys

Demonstration of reproductive biology and pollination ecology of plants in bloom encountered in the field.

Teaching of family concepts for developing field identification skills.

Typical Day: We begin with a lecture presentation, about 90 minutes long, take a short break, and spend the rest of the time doing lab or practical work.  About a half of the class meetings will be in the field - we take advantage of natural classroom-like areas and use field blackboards, then explore the flora of these areas in the practical portion of the day.  

All-day field trip: You will need to reserve all day (8:30-4:30) one day of week three for a full-day field trip.  We will figure out the day together.

Collection: A collection of dried plants is due July 10. You need to budget time each day outside of class time for assembling and identifying these plants.  Here are the guidelines:

  1. Numbers: 25 species representing at least 20 families.
  2. Specimens must be: dry, flat, and complete (include flowers and/or fruit and a sample of the roots)
  3. Each specimen must have a label with a correct genus and species name and a collection number, as well as other data.
  4. Present specimens unmounted, folded in paper, with the label included.
  5. Include only non-woody flowering plants. 
  6. Do not include cultivated plants.
  7. A list of the plants including genus, species, author, and family must accompany the collection.

See Guide to Collecting Plants for ample additional information.

Finishing the collection requires information on final preparation.

Exams: There will be a brief quiz every morning on lecture material and the plants we have already seen.  There will be two longer exams, a midterm on June 26 and a final exam on July 10.

Course Evaluation: quizzes 20%, midterm 20%, final 25%, collection 35%

Note: This course moves quickly - there is a lot to learn.  It is critical that you come to every class and that you arrive on time.  You must work hard and follow directions to do well.  The material is exciting, not very difficult, and there will be a lot of questions, so jump right in and ask them.  Don't be afraid to feel overwhelmed -- everyone else is too.  If there is any doubt as to whether the question you have is dumb, ask it.  Every question is important in this course.  Be sure to talk to the teaching fellow or me as soon as you encounter difficulties: don't wait until it's too late.


 

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