Datasets

Data Availability Name Description Objective Dates
DownloadableTotal Days of Snow Cover for VermontTotal days of snow cover greater than one inch in the state of Vermont. The total days of snow cover were calculated by averaging the total days of snow cover over one inch throughout various stations that measured snowfall for that year. This data was collected from NOAA CDO at https://www.ncdc.noaa.gov/cdo-web/search?datasetid=NORMAL_MLY. To reproduce this dataset use these search terms: Select Weather Observation Type/Dataset = Global Summary of the Year, Data Range = 1884 - 2017, Search for = States, Enter a search term = Vermont. Monitoring total days of snow cover (>1") over time (1888-2017). 1888-09-01 (ongoing)
DownloadableTotal Days of Snow Cover RegionalTotal days of snow cover greater than one inch in the New Hampshire, New York, and Vermont. The total days of snow cover were calculated by averaging the total days of snow cover over one inch throughout all stations that measured snowfall for that snow year (e.g. October 1999 - May 2000 is snow year 2000). This data was collected from NOAA CDO at https://www.ncdc.noaa.gov/cdo-web/search?datasetid=NORMAL_MLY using dataset type = Global Summary of the Month. Stations included were Burlington and St. Johnsbury, Vermont, Buffalo and Sherburne, New York, and Concord and Keene, New Hampshire. Data were not included where one station was not active for all snow year months for that state.Snow cover is projected to decrease in depth, duration, and extent under climate change. Lack of sufficient snow cover can make tree roots vulnerable to freezing damage and cause nutrients to be leached from the soil. Also, the melting of snow in late winter can provide a steady supply of water to trees when they are preparing for bud break. Snow cover fluctuations above or below the mean may result in undesirable conditions for native forest species.1888-09-01 (ongoing)