Beyond Communication: Advocating for Science and our Forests

University of Vermont, Davis Center, December 15, 2017

Agenda

2017 marks the 27th year of the Monitoring Cooperative and its first year as the Forest Ecosystem Monitoring Cooperative! This year's conference promises to deliver a dynamic array of talks and workshops designed to help collaborators build capacity to communicate and market their work to a broader stakeholder audience. This conference will help participants develop messages and share information in such a way that the public sees the value of forest ecosystem monitoring and research in our region and its relevance to their lives.

Below is our current draft of the agenda, and the latest details will be posted here as they become available.

Download the Agenda (Last updated: 12/14/2017)

8:15 - 9:00
Registration and Coffee
9:00 - 9:20
Welcome and Introductory Remarks
9:20 - 10:00
Keynote Presentation: Communicating for Impact
Tad Segal, President and Founder of Outreach Strategies

Tad Segal is a senior communications and advocacy strategist specializing in complex campaigns impacting public policy on sustainability issues at the domestic and international levels. As a mission-driven organization, Outreach Strategies is engaged in some of the most exciting and innovative integrated media, stakeholder engagement and international education campaigns to protect our air, land and water both in the U.S. and around the world. With deep experience in a variety of environments, including large coalitions, agency, corporate and government settings, he specializes in complex communications campaigns that impact public policy on sustainability issues. His keynote will address the key frameworks and approaches used in advocating for science-based decision making.

10:00 - 10:25
Successful Science Communication

5-minute flash talks demonstrating effective communication strategies and campaigns

The Short, Sweet and Engaging Story of Freshwater Mussels
Mark Ferguson, Zoologist, Vermont Department of Fish and Wildlife

So What? How to Grab & Hold People's Attention About Science
Bridget Butler, Principal, Bird Diva Consulting

Reaching Decision Makers: Using Science to Inform Policy
Jamey Fidel, General Counsel & Forest and Wildlife Program Director, Vermont Natural Resources Council

Science for impact? Know your audience
Julianna White, University of Vermont Gund Institute for Environment, CGIAR Research Program on Climate Change, Agriculture and Food Security

The Making of Outdoor Radio
Kent McFarland and Sara Zahendra, Vermont Center for Ecostudies, and Chris Albertine, Vermont Public Radio

10:25 - 10:30
Plenary wrap up and direction for rest of day
10:30 - 10:50
Coffee break
10:50 - 12:10
Contributed Talks 1

Three parallel tracks of 20-minute presentations contributed by cooperators on various forest ecosystem research, monitoring and outreach activities

Time Engaging Stakeholders and Influencing Forest Policy
Moderator: Alexandra Kosiba
Room: Silver Maple
Water Quality Assessment Across Scales
Moderator: Emily Drew
Room: Frank Livak
Trends and Patterns in Wildlife and Fisheries
Moderator: Carolyn Loeb
Room: Mildred Livak
10:50 to 11:10

Imported Forest Pests: Science Applied to Policy

Gary M. Lovett

+ ABSTRACT

Using LiDAR to Map Eroded Forest Roads in the Lake Champlain Basin, Vermont

Sean MacFaden

+ ABSTRACT

An Overview of Ongoing Moose Mortality and Productivity Research in Northern Vermont.

Jacob R. DeBow

+ ABSTRACT

Imported Forest Pests: Science Applied to Policy

Gary M. Lovett, Cary Institute of Ecosystem Studies

Presenter: Gary M. Lovett, Cary Institute of Ecosystem Studies

The forests of the Northeast have been subjected to repeated invasions of forests insects and pathogens imported through global trade. This is part of larger problem of forest pest invasion that affects the whole country. We convened a group of experts to assess the ecological and economic impacts of forest pests and policy options for preventing the importation of new pests. This presentation will discuss the findings of this study and subsequent activities to put these policies into action.

Using LiDAR to Map Eroded Forest Roads in the Lake Champlain Basin, Vermont

Alex Marcucci, Bear Creek Environmental, LLC
Jarlath O'Neil-Dunne, University of Vermont Spatial Analysis Laboratory
Mary Nealon, Bear Creek Environmental, LLC

Presenter: Sean MacFaden, University of Vermont Spatial Analysis Laboratory

Phosphorus pollution in Lake Champlain reduces water quality, degrades wildlife habitat, and compromises recreational activities such as swimming, boating, and fishing, Urban land uses and agriculture are known to be the primary sources of this pollution, but some of it could emanate from eroded logging roads and skid paths in managed forests. Most of these features are unmapped, so the magnitude and distribution of pollution from logging roads are unknown. Accordingly, this project explored methods for mapping forest roads in the Lake Champlain Basin and identifying segments likely to be eroded. Roads were mapped using a combination of LiDAR-derived surface models and automated feature extraction techniques in two sections of the Basin: Rutland County and the Upper Missisquoi Watershed. Eroded sites were then identified by examining gully depth and a stream power index derived from flow potential and slope. Field verification data for both study sites indicated that extensive networks of roads and trails were only partially mapped because some road segments were topographically indistinguishable from adjacent terrain. The resolution of the input LiDAR affected the capture rate, with 51% of field-verified roads mapped in Rutland County (0.7-m LiDAR) and 38% in the Upper Missisquoi Watershed (1.6-m LiDAR). However, the field data also showed that the most heavily-eroded sites were captured by automated modeling, suggesting that a LiDAR-based approach is useful to pollution estimation even when comprehensive networks cannot be effectively delineated. Future work should focus on improved capture of forest roads and field-based estimation of phosphorus loading from specific road types and site conditions.

An Overview of Ongoing Moose Mortality and Productivity Research in Northern Vermont.

Jacob DeBow1,2, Cedric Alexander1, James D. Murdoch2, Therese Donovan3

1Vermont Fish and Wildlife Department, 1 National Life Drive, Davis 2, Montpelier, Vermont 05620-3702, USA; 2Rubenstein School of Environment and Natural Resources, University of Vermont, Aiken Center, 81 Carrigan Drive, Burlington, Vermont 05405, USA; U. S. Geological Survey Vermont Cooperative Fish and Wildlife Research Unit, University of Vermont, Aiken Center, 81 Carrigan Drive, Burlington, Vermont 05405, USA.

Presenter: Jacob R. DeBow, University of Vermont, Vermont Fish and Wildlife Department

Current moose (Alces alces) research in Maine and New Hampshire identified 3 consecutive years (2014-2016) of winter tick (Dermacentor albipictus) epizootics causing >70% annual calf mortality (March-April). Tick indices on harvested bull moose in northeastern Vermont have consistently been lower than study areas in New Hampshire and western Maine. Although winter tick epizootics were considered relatively rare in Vermont, decreasing carcass weights and ovulation rates of Vermont cows indicate tick levels are still high enough to cause the current observed population decline. In response, the State of Vermont initiated a 3-year study similar to those in New Hampshire and Maine to investigate the population characteristics of Vermont's northeastern population. These 3 state research projects are linked geographically, occurring in similarly managed, private commercial forestland that is the core of moose habitat in the northeastern United States. In January 2017, a total of 60 moose (30 calves and 30 adult cows) were captured and fitted with GPS radio-collars to monitor winter calf mortality and adult productivity in northeastern Vermont. Calf mortality from March to April was 40% (12 of 30). Dead calves displayed overt signs of severe winter tick infestation, namely heavy tick loads, substantial weight loss (22.26kg-48.76kg) and musculature atrophy, and edema; histological studies of tissue samples are ongoing. Winter mortality of adult cows was 10% (3 of 30) and is considered normal. Productivity of yearling and adult cows was measured by direct observation from May to August with efforts focused on pregnant cows (n = 19) in the collared population. The calving rate was 50% (15 of 30) and 79% (15 of 19) of known pregnancies. Calf survival was 62% (10 of 16 including one set of twins) through mid-July putting total productivity at 33% (10 of 30). Capture of an additional 35 moose is planned for January 2018.
11:10 to 11:30

Bridging the Gap between Invasive Species Research and Management: Challenges and solutions in New York State

Carrie Brown-Lima

+ ABSTRACT

Dealing with Non-Detects: Using Censored Environmental Data Wisely

Rebecca M. Harvey

+ ABSTRACT

A Regional Investigation of Mercury in Small Mid-trophic Fishes and Predatory Game Fishes of Streams in the Northeastern United States

Karen Riva Murray

+ ABSTRACT

Bridging the Gap between Invasive Species Research and Management: Challenges and solutions in New York State

Presenter: Carrie Brown-Lima, NY Invasive Species Research Institute

The body of scientific knowledge on invasive species has been rapidly growing concurrently with the introduction and spread of new invasive species. Despite the increasing availability of new information and technology there continues to be a disconnect between research and management that can hinder the understanding and application of new solutions to invasive species challenges. In an effort to address this divide, New York State has established the New York Invasive Species Research Institute (NYISRI) based at Cornell University. NYISRI has the mission to communicate and coordinate invasive species research to help prevent and manage the impact of invasive species in New York State and beyond. The institute partners with New York's eight Partnerships for Regional Invasive Species Management (PRISMs), iMap Invasives database, Department of Environmental Conservation, Office of Parks, Recreation and Historic Preservation and many researchers across disciplines who are willing to devote their expertise to improve invasive species management on the ground.
This presentation will provide an overview of the comprehensive approach to address invasive species in New York State including the programs and activities that NYISRI is promoting in an effort to bridge the gap between invasive species research and management in New York State. It will also give insight on how recent research and innovations should influence the way we think about and manage invasive species moving forward.

Dealing with Non-Detects: Using Censored Environmental Data Wisely

Rebecca M. Harvey, Phillip Jones, Heather Pembrook, Jim Kellogg

Presenter: Rebecca M. Harvey, VT Dept of Environmental Conservation, Watershed Management Division

Scientists working with long term monitoring programs and historic data sets are often faced with the question of how to deal with censored data; in this case, data below the detection limit. The most common approach is to substitute the value with an arbitrary fraction of the detection limit (i.e. half the detection limit). Although they have been historically accepted, these substitution methods introduce significant biases to long term data sets, making trend detection all but impossible. Further, statistical analyses become more complicated as method detection limits change over time. Results below the detection limit (the "less thans") are still valuable data points that contribute meaningful information to long term data sets. So, we're still faced with the question of how to treat censored data? In this talk, I will present a few useful approaches to handling "less thans", based in part on the percent of censored values in the data set. This discussion will be presented within the context of Vermont's long-term acid lake monitoring data set, which contains both censored data and moving detection limits.

A Regional Investigation of Mercury in Small Mid-trophic Fishes and Predatory Game Fishes of Streams in the Northeastern United States

Karen Riva Murray, U.S. Geological Survey, New York Water Science Center, Troy, NY
Peter VanMetre, U.S. Geological Survey, Texas Water Science Center, Austin, TX
James Coles, U.S. Geological Survey, New England Water Science Center, Northboro, MA

Presenter: Karen Riva Murray, U.S. Geological Survey, New York Water Science Center, Troy, NY

Fish-tissue mercury (Hg) concentrations exceed human health advisory levels and wildlife guidelines in water bodies throughout the northeastern United States. Mercury concentrations in small, mid-trophic level invertivorous fishes and in predatory game fishes of this region's streams were assessed during the summer of 2016 as part of the Northeast Stream Quality Assessment (NESQA), a multi-stressor study conducted by the USGS National Water-Quality Program. The objectives of the fish mercury investigation were to document stream-fish Hg concentrations throughout the region and to describe the environmental factors associated with observed spatial patterns across the region. Streams were located in urban, agricultural, and forested watersheds, and represented a variety of potential mercury sources. Total mercury (THg), assumed to be primarily methylmercury (MeHg), was analyzed in fish tissue collected from 91 streams. Small-bodied, mid-trophic, invertivorous fishes were collected from nearly every site, and game fish samples were collected from 54 of the sites. The most commonly collected mid-trophic level fishes collected were Blacknose Dace (Rhinichthys atratulus, 61 sites), Longnose Dace (R. cataractae, 22 sites), and Creek Chub (Semotilus atromaculatus, 22 sites). These samples consisted of single-species composites of whole specimens. The most commonly collected game fish samples were salmonids (collected from 26 sites) and centrarchids (collected from 21 sites; mainly Micropterus and Lepomis species). Multiple mid-trophic level species and game fish species were collected at many sites, to facilitate spatial comparisons across the region. Fish and periphyton samples also were analyzed for nitrogen stable isotopes (?15N) to provide estimates of base-adjusted trophic position (i.e. by adjusting fish ?15N for differences among sites in base nitrogen signature). Fish Hg concentrations will be compared with human-health and wildlife-health guideline levels, and will be analyzed in relation to stream physical data (such as stage, temperature), water quality data (including pH and concentrations of dissolved organic carbon, sulfate, THg and MeHg), bed sediment THg, landscape characteristics, and food web characteristics (based on periphyton, macroinvertebrate, and fish community sampling data) to document factors affecting mercury bioaccumulation in stream-resident fish across the Northeastern United States.
11:30 to 11:50

Charting a future for research on the Northern Forest: NSRC partnerships to sustain forest research

William B. Bowden

+ ABSTRACT

High-frequency water quality measurements reveal differences in storm hysteresis and loading in relation to land cover and seasonality

Matthew C.H. Vaughan

+ ABSTRACT

Eastern Ribbonsnakes and Common Gartersnakes in Vermont: One Rare and One Abundant

Jim Andrews

+ ABSTRACT

Charting a future for research on the Northern Forest: NSRC partnerships to sustain forest research

Bowden, William B.1, Anthea Lavallee2, William H. McDowell3, David Newman4, Aaron Weiskittel5, and Chris Woodall6

1 Rubenstein School of Environment and Natural Resources, University of Vermont, Burlington, VT
2 Hubbard Brook Research Foundation, Woodstock, VT
3 Department of Natural Resources and the Environment, University of New Hampshire, Durham, NH
4 Forest and Natural Resources Management, SUNY-ESF, Syracuse, NY
5 School of Forest Resources, University of Maine, Orono, ME
6 Northern Resea

Presenter: William B. Bowden, Rubenstein School of Environment and Natural Resources. University of Vermont

Since its inception in 2001 the Northeastern States Research Cooperative (NSRC) has supported cross-disciplinary, collaborative research in the Northern Forest -- a 26-million acre working landscape that is home to more than two million residents and stretches from eastern Maine through New Hampshire and Vermont and into northern New York. A central component of the program has been the importance of the Northern Forest to society and the need for research activities to have relevance and benefit to "the people who live within its boundaries, work with its resources, use its products, visit it, and care about it." As directed by the public law that created it, the NSRC has been a competitive grant program for research on the Northern Forest region, jointly directed through the USDA Forest Service Northern Research Station, the University of Vermont, the University of New Hampshire, the University of Maine, and the SUNY College for Environmental Science and Forestry. Between 2001 and 2015 the NSRC has funded 279 completed projects with an additional 43 ongoing projects. These projects have been awarded to 176 individual researchers at 53 unique institutions, organizations, and agencies. The research has ranged over 14 core research interest areas, with the most important interest areas in (1) Forest Management & Productivity; (2) Atmospheric Pollution; (3) Forest Health & Invasive Species; and (4) Climate Change. The NSRC has successfully met its mission for over 15 years. But in recent years it has become apparent that the NSRC needs to re-envision its future. As a consequence, we are taking the 2017-18 year to reimagine what the NSRC might be. In the initial phases of this effort we have reached out to the stakeholder and researcher communities in the Northern Forest region to seek their advice and input. We are currently preparing a retrospective Business Report for the Forest Service, which will summarize the achievements of the NSRC over the last 17 years and in January 2018 we are planning a facilitated workshop to develop a strategic vision for the future. This is a transition that the FEMC has already successfully negotiated. As we consider how the NSRC might change in the future and what it might do and become, it has become clear that closer partnership with the FEMC could be beneficial to both organizations. In this presentation we will explore these benefits and seek input from the meeting participants to help us identify a future path that will best serve the Northern Forest communities and the resources that we all value.

High-frequency water quality measurements reveal differences in storm hysteresis and loading in relation to land cover and seasonality

Matthew C.H. Vaughan (Lake Champlain Basin Program and University of Vermont)
William B. Bowden (University of Vermont)
James B. Shanley (US Geological Survey)
Andrew Vermilyea (Castleton University)
Ryan Sleeper (University of Vermont)
Art J. Gold (University of Rhode Island)
Soni M. Pradhanang (University of Rhode Island)
Delphis F. Levia (University of Delaware)
Alan S. Andres (University of Delaware)
Francois Birgand (North Carolina State University)
Andrew W. Schroth (University of Vermont)

Presenter: Matthew C.H. Vaughan, Lake Champlain Basin Program and University of Vermont

Storm events dominate riverine loads of dissolved organic carbon (DOC) and nitrate and are expected to increase in frequency and intensity in many regions due to climate change. We deployed three high-frequency (15 min) in situ absorbance spectrophotometers to monitor DOC and nitrate concentration for 126 storms in three watersheds with agricultural, urban, and forested land use/land cover in the Lake Champlain Basin. We examined intrastorm hysteresis and the influences of seasonality, storm size, and dominant land use/land cover on storm DOC and nitrate loads. DOC hysteresis was generally anticlockwise at all sites, indicating distal and plentiful sources for all three streams despite varied DOC character and sources. Nitrate hysteresis was generally clockwise for urban and forested sites, but anticlockwise for the agricultural site, indicating an exhaustible, proximal source of nitrate in the urban and forested sites, and more distal and plentiful sources of nitrate in the agricultural site. The agricultural site had significantly higher storm nitrate yield per water yield and higher storm DOC yield per water yield than the urban or forested sites. Seasonal effects were important for storm nitrate yield in all three watersheds and farm management practices likely caused complex interactions with seasonality at the agricultural site. Hysteresis indices did not improve predictions of storm nitrate yields at any site. We discuss key lessons from using high-frequency in situ optical water quality sensors.

Eastern Ribbonsnakes and Common Gartersnakes in Vermont: One Rare and One Abundant

Presenter: Jim Andrews, The Vermont Reptile and Amphibian Atlas & The University of Vermont

The Eastern Ribbonsnake (Thamnophis sauritus) and the Common Gartersnake (Thamnophis sirtalis) are very similar in appearance and often confused, but once the appropriate field marks are learned, they are easy to tell apart in the field. The Eastern Ribbonsnake has a state heritage rank of S2, is a high priority species of greatest conservation need (SGCN) and is very limited in distribution within Vermont. The Common Gartersnake has a state heritage rank of S5 and is by far the most abundant and widespread snake in Vermont. Although historically reported from Grand Isle County and Shelburne Pond, the Eastern Ribbonsnake has not been documented from anywhere north of Rutland County in many decades. I will discuss the differences in appearance and habitat of these two species as well as historic and recent records. My hope is to generate more reports of Eastern Ribbonsnake in order to develop a better understanding of its current range and conservation status within Vermont.
11:50 to 12:10

Effective Communication with a Municipal Audience

Jens Hilke

+ ABSTRACT

Water Quality Blueprint - Nature-Based Solutions for Clean Water in Lake Champlain

Dan Farrell

+ ABSTRACT

From Vermont to the Dominican Republic: factors driving variation in apparent survival of Bicknell's Thrush on the breeding and wintering grounds

Jason M. Hill

+ ABSTRACT

Effective Communication with a Municipal Audience

Monica Przyperhart (monica.przyperhart@vermont.gov) Vermont Fish & Wildlife Department

Presenter: Jens Hilke, Vermont Fish & Wildlife Department

Vermont Fish & Wildlife Department staff work with all 251 VT Municipalities and Regional Planning Commissions to provide technical assistance on conservation planning for VT's fish, wildlife & habitats. Because 81% of VT is in private ownership and individual towns have land use planning & regulatory authority, we believe technical assistance is an effective approach to influence land use decisions made by municipalities, and this job is critical for the Department to achieve its mission of the conservation of all of Vermont's fish, wildlife and plant species, related habitats and natural communities.

Over the last ten years, Department staff have constantly worked to improve messaging for the municipal audience so that we can better advocate for fish & wildlife resources. This involves interpreting the full suite of natural heritage elements from the landscape scale (interior forest blocks, habitat connectivity, etc.)to natural communities and fine filter elements like vernal pools, rare & endangered species, and wetlands. Recently, Department staff developed a messaging triangle to ensure consistency in our approach while still maintaining the flexibility to address locally important resources and issues. The three points of this triangle represent the three main messages that we want all audiences to hear: "Your place is important," "This landscape is changing," and "You have a range of options for moving forward." No matter what the topic of a presentation, these three messages are embedded in the content, and we can pivot from one to the next. Our goal is to also maintain a central message for every conversation we have with the public: "The health of our ecology, economy, and community are intricately linked." Even when explaining complex scientific concepts, we strive to incorporate this messaging triangle into all of our work.

As the Agency has developed Vermont Conservation Design and presented it on the BioFinder website and in the text of a soon to be released publication titled "Mapping Vermont's Natural Heritage"(a mapping and conservation guide for land use planners), staff continue to wrestle with the most effective language to express difficult concepts, such as landscape scale, the importance of coarse-filter conservation, and the nuances of bringing each heritage element into the land use planning framework. While the scientific process should attempt to avoid value judgments or at least acknowledge them ahead of time, effective communication to this audience is intimately involved with the community values of each town and the individuals in the room. We strive to present this material in an effective way, connecting with community values and local understanding while empowering local decision makers to choose the way forward with a range of options, from non-regulatory to regulatory tools. We have found the messaging triangle to be an effective tool for achieving these goals.

Water Quality Blueprint - Nature-Based Solutions for Clean Water in Lake Champlain

Dan Farrell, The Nature Conservancy of Vermont; Rose Paul, The Nature Conservancy of Vermont; Ann Ingerson, The Nature Conservancy of Vermont; Shayne Jaquith, The Nature Conservancy of Vermont

Presenter: Dan Farrell, The Nature Conservancy of Vermont

Natural systems are increasingly considered to be cost-effective solutions to water quality problems, providing multiple ecological co-benefits. The Water Quality Blueprint is a publicly accessible online tool designed to help watershed managers and conservation practitioners make use of natural and restorable areas to achieve water quality and conservation goals in the Vermont portion of the Lake Champlain Basin. It includes two independent prioritizations of floodplains and other areas associated with rivers, lakes and wetlands: a map layer that highlights natural assets that would benefit from protection and restoration (Conservation Value) and a map layer that highlights locations that are impaired, at risk of impairment or that may attenuate sources of pollution (Water Quality Impact Value). These prioritizations are raster-based, weighted combinations of multiple component datasets that represent important habitats, natural processes, and impairments. The component datasets, as well as other supporting datasets, are included in the web-map to help users understand patterns related to ecology, pollution, restoration potential, and fluvial processes at the site, watershed, and basin scales. The results of the Water Quality Blueprint have been incorporated into the Clean Water Roadmap for Vermont, an online tool designed to support the VTDEC's efforts to reduce phosphorous pollution in the Lake Champlain Basin.

From Vermont to the Dominican Republic: factors driving variation in apparent survival of Bicknell's Thrush on the breeding and wintering grounds

John D. Lloyd [Vermont Center for Ecostudies], Kent P. McFarland [Vermont Center for Ecostudies], and Chris C. Rimmer [Vermont Center for Ecostudies]

Presenter: Jason M. Hill, Vermont Center for Ecostudies

To effectively conserve migratory species, we must understand the factors that drive year-round variation in demographic processes. Despite their status as a high conservation priority, fundamental questions remain regarding the processes that drive Bicknell's Thrush (Catharus bicknelli) populations. Bicknell's Thrush is a migratory songbird whose breeding range in the U.S. is restricted to chronically-disturbed montane forests of Balsam Fir (Abies balsamea) and spruce (Picea spp.) in four northeastern states. Bicknell's Thrush has one of the smallest breeding populations (~71,000) of North American passerines, 95% of the population occurs above 805 m, and >50% of that population occurs on just three public lands: White Mountain National Forest (NH and ME), Baxter State Park (ME), and the High Peaks Wilderness Area (NY). The majority of Bicknell's Thrushes are believed to overwinter in the Dominican Republic.

Using Cormack-Jolly-Seber (CJS) models, in a Bayesian framework, we explored how weather (including hurricanes), habitat loss and disturbance on the breeding and wintering grounds drive variation in apparent survival of adult Bicknell's Thrush . We used 15 years (2001-2015) of Bicknell's Thrush capture-mark-recapture data from Mt. Mansfield, Vermont. Variation in apparent survival was best explained by above-average temperature on the breeding grounds (May-July) in Vermont. Bicknell's Thrush were less likely to return to Mt. Mansfield following relatively warm breeding seasons. Apparent survivorship is driven by true mortality and permanent movement away from capture-recapture sites. Therefore, one possible explanation of this finding is that nesting success may be negatively affected by above-average temperatures, which in turn decreases adult site fidelity.

Surprisingly, annual deforestation rates in the Dominican Republic were not a strong predictor of Bicknell's Thrush apparent survival. Further, our results suggested that tropical storms and hurricanes were not associated with direct mortality of overwintering adult thrushes. Rather, our results indicated a delayed one-year boost in apparent survival following major storm system passage. Storms moving near or over the Dominican Republic during winter likely created areas of blowdown and disturbance. These areas of disturbance may result in improved foraging opportunities for thrushes in subsequent years.

Our results suggest that Bicknell's Thrush populations are driven by processes on both the breeding and wintering grounds. These findings illuminate numerous future avenues of research that may provide insight into the mechanisms driving Bicknell's Thrush inter-annual variation in abundance and survivorship.
12:10 - 1:20
Lunch
1:20 - 2:40
Contributed Talks 2

Three parallel tracks of 20-minute presentations contributed by cooperators on various forest ecosystem research, monitoring and outreach activities

Time Forest Ecology and Silviculture
Moderator: Alexandra Kosiba
Room: Mildred Livak
Environmental Change and Long-Term Monitoring
Moderator: Christian Schorn
Room: Jost


Can We Manage the Impacts of Climate Change on Sugar Maple and Maple Sugaring?
Moderator: Toni Lyn Morelli
Room: Frank Livak
12:50 to 1:10

How weather and other factors influence fall leaf color displays

Paul G. Schaberg

+ ABSTRACT

Update on Vermont Long-term Soil Monitoring Project

Thomas Villars, Don Ross

+ ABSTRACT

Finding the sweet spot: Climate optimum for maple syrup production

Joshua Rapp

+ ABSTRACT

How weather and other factors influence fall leaf color displays

Paula F. Murakami, USDA Forest Service Northern Research Station
Gary J. Hawley, University of Vermont, Rubenstein School of Environment and Natural Resources
John R. Butnor, USDA Forest Service Southern Research Station

Presenter: Paul G. Schaberg, USDA Forest Service Northern Research Station

Vistas of colorful fall foliage hold tremendous public and media interest, and associated tourism is estimated to add billions of dollars to the regional economy each year. This natural spectacle of diverse leaf coloration is based on the physiology of leaf pigments. There are three primary pigments in tree leaves - green chlorophyll and yellow carotenoid pigments that are in leaves all growing season, and red anthocyanins that are newly produced in the leaves of some species (e.g., maples, ash, red oak, etc.) during autumn. The initial change in color associated with fall color development is the fading of chlorophyll to reveal yellow carotenoids that were always there but had been masked by green. This process is triggered by reductions in day length, but is greatly hastened by exposure to environmental stresses (e.g., drought or seasonal low temperatures) that can speed leaf senescence. Environmental stress is also associated with the production of anthocyanin pigments in the fall. Anthocyanins serve as protective compounds that may help leaves stay on trees longer and allow for greater sugar and nutrient resorption prior to leaf fall. Greater resource recovery from leaves before they abscise may benefit tree health and productivity in later growing seasons. The specific timing and intensity of leaf color displays depends on the interplay of environmental triggers that either speed up (e.g., drought and low temperatures) or slow down (e.g., ample precipitation and mild temperatures) chlorophyll breakdown and anthocyanin production. Several examples of how these processes can play out across the landscape will be provided.

Update on Vermont Long-term Soil Monitoring Project

Presenter: Thomas Villars, Don Ross, USDA Natural Resources Conservation Service; University of Vermont

The Vermont Long-term Soil Monitoring Project was founded in 1998. Initial sampling was done at each site in 2000, and 5 year incremental soil sampling was begun in 2002. Follow-up sampling has been carried out in 2007, 2012, and in 2017. This talk presents a brief overview of the project and highlights what has been learned in the nearly 20 year timespan of the project. It also will offer reflections on the challenges and opportunities facing the project in the future.

Finding the sweet spot: Climate optimum for maple syrup production

Joshua M. Rapp (1,2), David A. Lutz (3), Ryan D. Huish (4), Boris Dufour (5), Selena Ahmed (6), Toni Lyn Morelli(1,7), Kristina A. Stinson (1)

1 Department of Environmental Conservation, University of Massachusetts Amherst
2 Harvard Forest, Harvard University
3 Environmental Studies Program, Dartmouth College
4 Department of Natural Sciences, University of Virginia's College at Wise
5 University du Quebec Chicoutimi
6 Department of Health and Human Development, Montana State University
7 United States Geological Survey

Presenter: Joshua Rapp, Harvard Forest

Maple sap collected for maple syrup production only flows when freezing temperatures are followed by a thaw. Since temperature fluctuations are most frequent in the fall and spring, maple syrup producers tap trees at these times, although mostly commonly in the spring when sap sugar content is higher. While the conditions that support daily sap flow have been studied at individual sites and are relatively well understood, the relationships between climate conditions (i.e. monthly average temperatures) and the tapping season over the entire range of sugar maple has not been described. Knowing how the timing and length of the tapping season, overall season-long sap flow, and sap sugar content are related to monthly mean climates would be useful for forecasting the maple syrup season at lead times of a few months to decades since monthly averages can be more reliably forecast at these time scales than daily weather fluctuations.

ACERnet (Acer Climate and Socio-Ecological Research Network) is collecting data at sites across the geographic range of sugar maple to describe the tapping season response to climate. At each of 6 sites ranging from sugar maples southern range limit in Virginia to its northern range in Quebec we have monitored sap flow and sugar content for up to 6 years. We used this data to describe climate responses for several metrics of tapping season timing, duration, and quality, and then used these relationships to create projections of the tapping season at the sample sites in the future. Here we report on these results, explore whether there is a climate optimum for maple syrup projection, and discuss how maple syrup production may change across the region of production in the future.
1:10 to 1:30

Regional spatiotemporal patterns of forest disturbance using aerial detection surveys

Alexandra M. Kosiba

+ ABSTRACT

Ridges, Valleys, Bedrock & Soil: Using the Physical Landscape to Conserve Species in a Changing Climate

Bob Zaino and Liz Thompson

+ ABSTRACT

Climate Effects on Maple Phytochemistry and Producer Perceptions and Responses

Selena Ahmed and David Lutz

+ ABSTRACT

Regional spatiotemporal patterns of forest disturbance using aerial detection surveys

Alexandra M. Kosiba (1,2), Garrett W. Meigs (1,3,4), James A. Duncan (1,2), Jennifer A. Pontius (1,2,5), William S. Keeton(1,3), and Emma R. Tait (1,2)

1 University of Vermont, Rubenstein School of Environment and Natural Resources, Burlington, VT
2 Forest Ecosystem Monitoring Cooperative, South Burlington, VT
3 University of Vermont, Gund Institute for Environment, Burlington, VT
4 Oregon State University, College of Forestry, Corvallis, OR
5 USDA Forest Service, Northern Research Station, Burlington

Presenter: Alexandra M. Kosiba, University of Vermont, Rubenstein School of Environment and Natural Resources, Burlington, VT, USA

Forest disturbances have significant influences on forest ecosystem composition, structure, and function, as well as carbon sequestration and other important ecosystem services. Recognizing the importance of monitoring forest disturbances, federal and state agencies in the United States (US) have conducted annual aerial detection surveys (ADS) to quantify the spatial extent and severity of forest disturbances. Although geospatial data have been collected for decades, they have not been compiled across the northeastern US to investigate interannual and cumulative disturbance patterns. Using 17 years of ADS data (2000-2016), a new disturbance mapping portal (the "Northeastern Forest Health Atlas") was created to investigate forest disturbances in New England and New York. Using this newly compiled database, we examined the spatiotemporal patterns of disturbance.

Our analysis indicated that approximately 11.0 million ha of forestlands in the study region (10%) have experienced at least one disturbance event over the 17-year period, averaging (+/-SE) 647,425 +/- 215,482 ha (3.4% +/- 1.1% of forestland) year-1. While there were no detectable temporal trends in total annual disturbance or relative amount of disturbance by agent, we found that some coastal ecoregions experienced higher disturbance rates than others (e.g., Acadian Plains and Hills and Atlantic Coastal Pine Barrens). Insects caused the greatest amount of mapped disturbance (8,097,969 ha), and a relatively small number of non-native introduced insects (19 species) were responsible for half of this damage. Within the region, we detected several "hotspots" with multiple disturbance events, with some of these experiencing as many as 12 years of disturbance in the 17-year record. Repeated disturbance by insects often co-occurred with other causal agents (typically abiotic), indicating that secondary stressors are important drivers of forest decline. Because climate change may alter the types, intensities, and frequencies of forest disturbance, quantifying baseline, historical patterns is critical for detecting shifts in disturbance dynamics and developing adaptive management alternatives.

Ridges, Valleys, Bedrock & Soil: Using the Physical Landscape to Conserve Species in a Changing Climate

Presenter: Bob Zaino and Liz Thompson, Vermont Fish and Wildlife Department and Vermont Land Trust

The physical landscape - the underlying "stage" of the natural landscape - plays a critical role in the expression of biological diversity. With climate change expected to scramble familiar species-habitat associations and rearrange natural communities, conserving diversity in the physical landscape will be increasingly important. Vermont Conservation Design, a comprehensive plan for an ecologically functional landscape, applied a new approach to incorporating physical features in conservation planning. By representing the full diversity of topography, aspect, elevation, and geology as part of a connected natural landscape, the design helps maximize opportunities for species to shift ranges and find suitable new settings in a changing climate. This can serve as a practical and efficient way to plan for long-term conservation of biological diversity.

Climate Effects on Maple Phytochemistry and Producer Perceptions and Responses

David Lutz, Joshua Rapp, Ryan Huish, Boris Dufour, Debra Kraner, Toni Morelli, Autumn Brunelle, Christina Stinson

Presenter: Selena Ahmed and David Lutz, Food and Health Lab at Montana State University and Dartmouth College

Global environmental change is impacting forest and agricultural systems around the world and is presenting both challenges and opportunities for producer livelihoods, food resources, and consumer wellbeing. While studies have shown the impact of climate change on crop yields, research is needed to elucidate the effects of climate change on crop quality. This study uses sugar maple as a study system to examine the effects of global environmental change on crop quality and associated producer perceptions and responses. Specifically, we examine the influence of weather variables on maple sap quality as measured by phytochemicals in the eastern range of sugar maple in North America. These findings are presented alongside perceptions elicited through surveys with maple producers on climate change and its effects on the sugar maple system including sap quality. Lastly, findings are presented on maple producer responses to various climate scenarios.
1:30 to 1:50

Windstorm and salvage harvest in northern mixed deciduous forests change forest structure, but not plant community diversity or richness.

Sarah Pears

+ ABSTRACT

Evaluating trends and environmental drivers of sugar maple and red oak growth in the state of Vermont

Rebecca L. Stern

+ ABSTRACT

What Sap with That?: A look at how Native Americans are Adapting to Climate Change and Maple Sap Production.

Autumn Brunelle

+ ABSTRACT

Windstorm and salvage harvest in northern mixed deciduous forests change forest structure, but not plant community diversity or richness.

Sarah Pears, Rubenstein School of Environment and Natural Resources, University of Vermont, Burlington, VT
Kimberly Wallin, Rubenstein School of Environment and Natural Resources, University of Vermont and USDA Forest Service Northern Research Station, Burlington, VT
Timothy Work, Departement des Sciences Biologiques, Universite du Quebec ? Montreal, Montreal, QC

Presenter: Sarah Pears, Rubenstein School of Environment and Natural Resources, University of Vermont, Burlington, VT

Windstorms are the most important ecological disturbance in northeastern United States forests due to their frequency and intensity, and the severity of tree destruction they cause. In the wake of a windstorm that damages forest stands managers may salvage harvest, logging damaged trees to recover economic, recreational, aesthetic, or other values threatened by the destruction of existing forest conditions; however, ecological outcomes of post-windstorm salvage harvest in northern mixed deciduous forests are not well understood. We investigated impacts of a 2010 windstorm and subsequent salvage harvest in Vermont on forest structure and plant community. Data collected in 2014 indicates that forest structure was significantly different among stands that were not windthrown or recently harvested (reference), unharvested windthrown stands (windthrown), and salvage-harvested windthrown stands (salvaged). Reference and salvaged sites had significantly lower coarse woody debris abundance than windthrown sites; there was no difference in coarse woody debris abundance between control and harvested sites. Live tree basal area was significantly higher in control sites than both windthrown and salvaged sites. We found no significant differences in dead tree basal area between control sites and windthrown or salvaged sites, although dead tree basal area was lower in salvaged sites than windthrown sites with marginal significance. Plant community diversity, calculated as Shannon-Wiener diversity indices, and species richness were not different among treatments, although some individual plant species were favored by disturbance. These findings provide forest managers with clear evidence of short-term outcomes of post-windstorm salvage harvest in mixed deciduous forests.

Evaluating trends and environmental drivers of sugar maple and red oak growth in the state of Vermont

Rebecca L. Stern, Rubenstein School of Environment and Natural Resources, University of Vermont, Burlington, VT, USA
Paul G. Schaberg, USDA Forest Service, Burlington, VT, USA
Chris F. Hansen, Rubenstein School of Environment and Natural Resources, University of Vermont, Burlington, VT, US
Paula F. Murakami, USDA Forest Service, S. Burlington, VT, USA
Shelly A. Rayback, Department of Geography, University of Vermont, Burlington, VT, USA
Gary J. Hawley, Rubenstein School of Environment and

Presenter: Rebecca L. Stern, PhD Candidate, University of Vermont

Understanding how tree species in the Northern Forest have responded to anthropogenic factors such as climate change and pollution inputs in the past is critical for future ecological management, because experimental evidence indicates that these factors can significantly alter the health and productivity of some tree species. As part of a larger dendrochronology project examining how the woody growth of major tree species in the Northern Forest has changed over the last century, Northern red oak (Quercus rubra L.) and sugar maple (Acer saccharum Marsh.) growth is being examined to better understand the main drivers of productivity in these important species. Northern red oak is sparse yet widely distributed throughout the forest ecosystems of Vermont (VT), however, its habitat suitability and abundance are projected to increase as temperatures rise. Sugar maple, a major component of the northern hardwood forest, has exhibited declines in crown health and growth in recent decades-a trajectory that could threaten tourism, sugaring and other industries within the state.

We are quantifying changes in annual xylem increment growth of dominant and codominant red oak and sugar maple trees at multiple sites across different latitudes, aspects, and elevations throughout VT using standard dendrochronological techniques. Relative growth trends are being related to local- and elevationally-adjusted climate data (e.g., temperature and precipitation), regional and global climate indices and datasets (e.g., Standardized Precipitation-Evapotranspiration Index), and other environmental data (e.g., pollution inputs of sulfur and nitrogen) to assess their influence on species-specific productivity. Our final product will be models of growth based on the individual and/or interacting variables that best explain historical growth for each species. These models will inform projections of future growth assuming modeled changes in environmental growth drivers.

What Sap with That?: A look at how Native Americans are Adapting to Climate Change and Maple Sap Production.

Autumn Brunelle; Selena Ahmed; Josh Rapp; Aaron Ellis; David Lutz

Presenter: Autumn Brunelle, Acer Climate and Socio-Ecological Research Network (ACERnet)

Native American tribes in the midwestern and northeastern United States use maple syrup to continue cultural practices, and traditional teachings. Both Western and Non-Western cultures are discovering that sugar maple health is declining, and the tapping season has become more sporadic. Focus groups and one-on-one interviews with representatives from various tribes show that Native Americans are adapting to climate change in ways that are different from Western thought. Native Americans are practicing new ways to manage natural resources by considering their traditional belief of living with nature and concentrating on long-term solutions. Focusing on other culturally significant, sap producing species is one way that Native Americans are adapting. In Western culture, interviews show that businesses respond in ways that maximize profits over the short term by turning to advanced technology and redesigning products. Ultimately, Western response is panic whereas Native Americans are choosing to accept what nature has given them.
1:50 to 2:10

Seventy years of northern hardwood silviculture: long-term compositional and structural evolution after repeated group selection

Nicole S. Rogers

+ ABSTRACT

Factors Affecting Use of Climate Change Science and Decision Support Tools for Forest Management in Vermont

Clare Ginger

+ ABSTRACT

Ziizabokdoke: A cultural tradition of sugar making for one Midwestern tribe and seven generations of change

Bonnie Ekdahl and Alex Bryan

+ ABSTRACT

Seventy years of northern hardwood silviculture: long-term compositional and structural evolution after repeated group selection

Nicole S. Rogers (1), Anthony W. D'Amato (1), W.B. Leak (2)
1 University of Vermont, Rubenstein School of the Environment and Natural Resources
2 USDA Forest Service Northern Research Station

Presenter: Nicole S. Rogers, University of Vermont RSENR

Group selection is a widely applied uneven-aged management approach for northern hardwood forests in northeastern North America. Previous work has demonstrated that repeated application of group selection can provide diverse forest structure and composition, particularly an increased component of mid-tolerant species, relative to single-tree selection; however, outcomes from this approach have generally been discussed at the stand level and over short time frames. As such, there is limited understanding of within group dynamics and development over time.

Continuous application of group selection has occurred since the late 1930s at the US Forest Service Bartlett Experimental Forest in the White Mountains of New Hampshire providing a unique opportunity to examine the long-term impacts of group selection on forest structural and compositional conditions. In particular, mapping of historic group openings allowed for characterization of the evolution of individual cohorts in terms of changes in species composition, structure, and recruitment over extended time periods. Results synthesize over 70 years of measurements and demonstrate that behavior of individual cohorts follows patterns of development exhibited by even-aged stands, including early dominance by intolerant and mid-tolerant species. Additionally, analysis highlights emergent stand-level properties in terms of size structures and compositional conditions that are critical for landowners to consider as they weigh the benefits of applying this approach over long time frames. This is particularly important in the context of long-term forest dynamics and future uncertainty in environmental and management conditions.

Factors Affecting Use of Climate Change Science and Decision Support Tools for Forest Management in Vermont

Clare Ginger, University of Vermont
William Valliere, University of Vermont
James Duncan, Forest Ecosystem Monitoring Cooperative, University of Vermont

Presenter: Clare Ginger, University of Vermont

The US Forest Service has identified climate change as an important driver of landscape change, and a source of risk for forests and grasslands in the US. The Forest Health and Climate Research Group in the Rubenstein School at the University of Vermont is gathering data and developing models to assess the impacts of climate change on forest ecosystem health in the state of Vermont. In consultation with stakeholder groups, we are integrating these data into a spatially-structured decision support tool for forest management.

In this presentation, we ask: What are potential uses for climate change data and decision support tools in forest management decisions in Vermont? How do these vary by type of user? What factors may affect the use of climate change data and decision support tools? How do these vary by type of user?

To address these questions, we draw on information from transcripts of meetings with 18 individuals from 13 organizations (federal and state agencies, non-profit organizations, county foresters) in the state of Vermont, and selected organizational documents. We coded these materials for key themes related to potential uses of data and tools, and for factors affecting use of the tool. This presentation provides a comparative assessment among types of organizations related to these themes. It also considers how potential users of the data and tools can contribute to the development of tools. Finally, it reflects on the institutional context of the overall project and how it relates to the capacity to generate and provide data about climate change and related trends in forest health for use in forest management decisions.

Ziizabokdoke: A cultural tradition of sugar making for one Midwestern tribe and seven generations of change

Bonnie Ekdahl, Saginaw Chippewa Indian Tribe, bekdahl@sagchip.org
Alex Bryan, Saginaw Chippewa Tribe, abryang@usgs.gov

Presenter: Bonnie Ekdahl and Alex Bryan, Saginaw Chippewa Indian Tribe/United States Geological Survey

Ziizabokdoke, or making maple sugar, has been an enduring cultural tradition among Native Americans for countless generations. In fact, the colonists learned the art of sugar making from the natives! For one member of a tribe in the center of Michigan's Lower Peninsula, ziizabokdoke continues to be not only common practice, but a way of life that brings together the whole community. In this presentation, a sugarer from the Saginaw Chippewa Indian Tribe describes the traditional tools and practices that she and her ancestors have used and engaged in for generations, the annual celebrations she hosts with her family to honor the sugarbush and mark the sugaring season, the natural " signals" she relies on to cue steps along the tapping process, and how her product gets distributed amongst members of her tribe and its versatile utility – beyond a sweetener! Additionally, she will share a personal account of how ziizabokdoke has changed over recent generations, and concerns for the future of ziizabokdoke and the health of the sugar maple, as well as journaling she is doing to monitor these changes. The talk will conclude with an exploration of " seven generations" of change through the eyes of long-term weather records and climate models, including changes in the timing and duration of the traditional tapping season, as well as the predictability of the optimal tapping date, the conditions of previous seasons leading up to the tapping season that influence sap quality, and the timing of those natural signals that this native tapper depends on throughout the season.
2:40 - 3:00
Coffee Break
3:00 - 4:30
Working Groups

Revisit the science communication and advocacy topics from the morning plenary to learn more techniques, hone skills or learn from experts in the field.

Confirmed working sessions include:

Can We Manage the Impacts of Climate Change on Sugar Maple and Maple Sugaring?

Open to All

This special track of talks, posters, discussion, and scenario planning throughout the afternoon will bring together researchers and collaborators from state and federal agencies, tribal partners, and private industry (including you!) from around the region to learn and discuss "Can We Manage the Impacts of Climate Change on Sugar Maple and Maple Sugaring?". The tapping of maple trees is a cultural touchstone for many people in the northeast and Midwest and Native American tribes have collected and boiled down sap for centuries. Because the tapping season is dependent on weather conditions, there is concern about the sustainability of maple sugaring as climate changes throughout the region. In addition, Northern Hardwood species like sugar maple are expected to contract their range northward eventually. In spite of this, maple syrup production is increasing rapidly, with demand rising as more people appreciate this natural sweetener.

The ACERnet team of researchers from across the US and Canada will present on research earlier in the afternoon that has been funded through the Department of Interior Northeast Climate Science Center to address the impact of climate change on syrup quality, tapping timing, and maple distribution. Informed by the needs of state and federal resource managers, tribal groups, and other maple syrup producers, the research team has analyzed how climate variation and climate change is impacting the chemical composition of sap throughout the northeast region. They will also present on climate change adaptation options, including the potential use of less climate-sensitive red maples as alternatives to sugar maple.

This Working Group session will discuss climate adaptation options, for managers and producers to share insights and strategies, and to use scenario planning to brainstorm on what maple sugaring will look like in the future.
Following the working session, we will have a Poster session focused on the impacts of climate change on the culture and ecology of sugar maple - relevant contributions welcome.

Organizer: Toni Lyn Morelli, DOI Northeast Climate Science Center; University of Massachusetts

Room: Frank Livak Ballroom


Climate Change and an Ecologically Functional Landscape: How Can We Plan For and Achieve Conservation Success?

Open to All

In 2015, the Vermont Fish and Wildlife Department and Vermont Land Trust produced "Vermont Conservation Design: Maintaining and Enhancing an Ecologically Functional Landscape." This effort identified the highest priority forest blocks, and surface waters and riparian areas needed to sustain the state's biological diversity into the future. We'd like to use this work, and other recent regional conservation planning efforts as a jumping off point for a wide-ranging discussion about the science and implementation of conservation planning. Questions include: Is the concept of an ecologically functional landscape the right one for dealing with climate change adaptation and evolution? How do we know if a landscape is self-adapting to climate change, and when do we intervene in species migration and natural community dynamics? What types of monitoring and assessment are needed to recognize success? How do we take dispersed conservation ideas, plans, and organizations and build towards a coherent whole? And, even if the science is right, how do we get large-scale conservation done? How do we overcome societal constraints? How can we use scientific conservation planning efforts to create a positive vision of people living within an ecologically functional landscape?

Organizer: Bob Zaino (VT Fish and Wildlife), Eric Sorenson (VT Fish and Wildlife), and Liz Thompson (Vermont Land Trust)

Room: Sugar Maple Ballroom


Informing Policy – expert testimony and other ways to engage with lawmakers

Open to All

Join a diverse group of environmental leaders and decision makers to explore how and why science informs policy in today’s information-rich government. This discussion will mine the experiences of our roundtable participants as public officials, environmental advocates, legislators, and educators, touching upon the varied techniques and strategies that successfully communicate important research findings to broad audiences.
Panelists:
Rebecca Ellis, Deputy Commissioner, Vermont Department of Environmental Conservation
Jamey Fidel, General Counsel & Forest and Wildlife Program Director, Vermont Natural Resources Council
Neil Kamman, Senior Policy Advisor, Vermont Department of Environmental Conservation
David Mears, Director, Environmental Law Center, Vermont Law School

Organizer: Rebecca Ellis, Jamey Fidel, Joanne Garton, Neil Kamman, David Mears

Room: Jost Foundation Room


Media Training for Scholars: Getting News Coverage for Science

Open to All

Garnering news coverage for your scientific efforts can amplify the impact and recognition of your work. Tailored for researchers, this media training presentation will help scholars and scientists to understand 1) what makes news, 2) key elements of successful media outreach, 3) and how to stay in control of interactions with journalists.

Organizer: Basil Waugh, Gund Institute for the Environment, University of Vermont

Room: Chittenden Bank Room


Stakeholder Engagement in Research and Results

Open to All

After discussing successful examples of engaging the public in our results, participants will examine how to 1) involve stakeholders in their own research (stakeholder mapping, planning for involvement) and 2) engage stakeholders with research results (verbal and visual messages, strategies). This will be an interactive session; participants will share ideas, provide feedback, and hone messages.

Organizer: Julianna White (University of Vermont Gund Institute for the Environment, CGIAR Research Program on Climate Change, Agriculture and Food Security) and Bridget Butler (Principal, BirdDiva Consulting)

Room: Williams Family Room


4:30 - 5:30
Poster Session and Social Hour

Enjoy conversation and posters at the end of the day.

Accepted Posters:

(Re)expansion of the maple syrup industry in New England: projecting where the taps will be in a changing environment
Presenter: Joshua Rapp, Harvard Forest

An Investigation of Nutritional Effects On Beech Bark Disease Causal Organisms
Presenter: Gretchen Lasser, Department of Forest and Natural Resources Management, SUNY-ESF

Assessing a strategy of climate change adaptation for maple syrup producers in the Southern Appalachians: Diversification of maple species as sap sources.
Presenter: Ryan Huish, The University of Virginia's College at Wise

Battle of the Babies: Beech Interference with Maple Regeneration
Presenter: Daniel S. Hong, SUNY-ESF

Citizen Science in Action: 15 Years of the LaRosa Partnership Program
Presenter: Elijah Schumacher/ Jim Kellogg, DEC WSMD

Earthworm Cocoons: The Cryptic Side of Invasive Earthworm Populations
Presenter: Maryam Nouri-Aiin, Department of Plant and Soil Science, University of Vermont

Effects of Human Visitation on Mammals as Detected by Trail Cameras in Colchester, Vermont
Presenter: Jade Jarvis, Biology Student Saint Michael's College

Effects of Long-Term Nutrient Addition on Acer saccharum Sap Flow
Presenter: Alexandrea Rice, SUNY ESF, 1 Forestry Drive, Syracuse, NY 13210

Effects of woody shrub and tree density on species richness and habitat preference
Presenter: Alyssa Valentyn, Saint Michael's College

Forest Health Indicators Dashboard: Assessing the condition of forested ecosystems
Presenter: Jennifer Pontius, RSENR University of Vermont and USFS Northern Research Station

Future distribution of sugar-maple dominated forests on the Green Mountain National Forest under climate change
Presenter: Anthony W. D'Amato, University of Vermont, Rubenstein School of Environment and Natural Resources; Department of Interior Northeast Climate Science Center

Hydraulic safety margins and air-seeding thresholds in roots, trunks, branches, and petioles of four northern hardwood trees
Presenter: Brett A. Huggett, Bates College

Is gene flow extensive and inhibiting adaptation of red spruce (Picea rubens) along an elevational gradient?
Presenter: Brittany M. Verrico, Dept. of Plant Biology, University of Vermont, Burlington, Vermont, USA

Maple syrup in a changing climate
Presenter: Joshua Rapp, Harvard Forest

Monitoring the Health of Vermont's Forests: Long-Term Trends and Natural Communities
Presenter: Caroline Drayton, Forest Ecosystem Monitoring Cooperative, RSENR

Northeast Forest Information Source (NEFIS): A New, Open-Access, Online Portal for Research Related to the Northern Forest
Presenter: Meg Fergusson, Center for Research on Sustainable Forests (CRSF) at the University of Maine

ourVTwoods.org Outreach Display
Presenter: Kate Forrer, UVM Extension

Putting an Ear to the Ground: Monitoring the Impacts of Climate Change on Working Forests
Presenter: Jennifer Hushaw, Applied Forest Scientist, Climate Services Program, Manomet, Inc.

Qualitative Contributions to Climate Adaptation: Living History and Knowledge of the Sugar Maple
Presenter: Lena Wilson, Allissa Stutte, Devon Brock-Montgomery, Red Cliff and Bad River Bands of Lake Superior Chippewa

Soil Nutrients Affect on Fall Leaf Retention in Northern Hardwood Forests.
Presenter: Madison Morley, State University of New York College of Environmental Science and Forestry

Specific leaf area and amino acids vary within sugar maple canopies and across fertilization treatments
Presenter: Alexander R. Young, SUNY-ESF

The "Future Forests Geo-visualization and Decision Support Tool": Linking science and management in a geospatial, mutli-criteria structured decision support framework
Presenter: Jennifer Pontius, UVM and USFS NRS

The effect of acid-mine drainage on the diversity of sensitive species of macroinvertebrates in two branches of a Vermont stream
Presenter: Mariah J. Witas, Saint Michael's College

The Nature Conservancy Dam Screening Tool
Presenter: Shayne Jaquith, The Nature Conservancy

The Northeast Climate Science Center: Improving the way climate science informs resource management
Presenter: Toni Lyn Morelli, U.S. Geological Survey, Department of Interior Northeast Climate Science Center

The Power of Collaboration: Building Relationships and Fostering Public Support
Presenter: Elizabeth Spinney, Vermont Department of Forests, Parks & Recreation

Water Quality Blueprint - Nature-Based Solutions for Clean Water in Lake Champlain
Presenter: Dan Farrell, The Nature Conservancy of Vermont

Xylem-vessel networks and drought resistance in northern hardwood trees
Presenter: Jay Wason, Yale School of Forestry & Environmental Studies