Posts Tagged your first job

How to Negotiate Your Salary

Posted on November 14, 2013 with No Comments

Handshake

This past year, mint.com, a financial planning website, conducted a survey and created an infographic called, “Wage Wars: How Men & Women Negotiate Salaries.” Through their survey they found that 37% of men and only 26% of women negotiate their starting salary after landing a new position. Not only is there a gender gap, but the numbers are substantially low. So, what can you do to help yourself land a job you’re excited about, but most importantly a salary you deserve? Use the 4 tips listed below to help negotiate your next salary:

  1. Research. By using a few different resources, you’ll want to research salaries within your career field and within the geographical area to help you identify a number or range. In addition, you’ll want to consider the number of years of experience you have, the cost of living and how the team can benefit from your skills and experience to meet the need of the job.
  2. Let the employer state their number or range first. Letting the employer state their number first will allow you more room for negotiation, but remember, you’ll have to defend your reasons why you need to counteroffer.
  3. Know your worth, and not just in dollars. You’ll want to consider other “benefits” you can negotiate with including; vacation time, flex time, bonuses, stock options, etc. Regardless, know your worth and have a bottom line.
  4. Keep calm and control of your emotions. Negotiating a salary can be filled with a lot of emotion, so do your best and leave your emotions at the door.

~Danielle

Savvy Seniors: Start “Relationship Building” Today!

Posted on November 7, 2013 with No Comments

Alyson Welch at Machu Pichu

Alumnae Alyson Welch shares her networking experience and advice

What role has networking played in your career exploration and job search?

Networking has played a huge role in my professional development.  Four years ago, I moved to Madrid, Spain and had no idea what I was going to do.  After a few months, I found a job and two internships through networking—through a friend of my mother-in-law, a college contact and a previous internship supervisor.

When we moved back to Vermont almost three years ago, I was concerned about finding a job. I started identifying companies of interest and looking for contacts at these companies.  In three months, I met with four people from Tetra Tech ARD, all referred to me through various contacts (a former UVM professor, a college friend of my husband’s and a friend of a friend that I met at a birthday party.)  When a position opened up at Tetra Tech ARD, I eagerly applied and used the knowledge I had acquired through networking to help write my cover letter and prepare for the interview.

Networking can be a bit intimidating.  What has helped you network effectively?

People are much more willing to share information and provide advice than to give you a job. If you are just looking for information, it’s easier to ask people to chat.

I’m kind of shy, so it’s a little intimidating to me to reach out to people that I don’t know. I’ve tried to challenge myself and send emails or call people, thinking that it’s always worth a shot.  I actually don’t like the word “networking” as it sounds sort of insincere.  I prefer to think of it as meeting people and building relationships that are mutually beneficial. Keeping this in mind makes networking – or relationship-building – more organic and, to me, rewarding.  People were very good to me during my job search and I’ve tried to do the same now that I have a job.

What advice might you give to a senior who isn’t sure how to begin their network?

Keep your request to meet short and simple. Be prepared and have a list of questions ready. Ask people to suggest other contacts. Remember to thank the person. Keep track of who you have met and follow up from time to time.  Try to keep your network alive.  Invite the people you have met to connect on LinkedIn

Also, use LinkedIn to identify UVM alums in your field and reach out to them. Check with professors, co-workers and family/friends to see if they might recommend professional contacts. Think about who is already in your network – maybe your aunt knows someone.  Never doubt the importance of any connection—even if someone is not in your field, you never know who they might know.

The most important thing to do is just start networking.  Once you start, you’ll gain momentum and it can even become fun.  Moreover, I am confident that networking is the best way to ultimately find a job – especially one that you’ll like.

Alyson Welch
Project Manager at Tetra Tech ARD

Want to learn more about networking? Join us for:
Seniors Lunch and Learn: Networking Made Easy!
Wed. Nov 13, 12 pm, the Hub

The Single Most Important Thing To Do After the Job Fair

Posted on October 31, 2013 with No Comments

Thank you note

Write a thank you note.

Why? A prompt and sincere note of thanks helps you stand out among the hundreds of other people the employer met at the fair. It demonstrates that you’re sincerely interested and motivated about their company, it demonstrates your writing skills and it can make you more memorable than any other candidate.

Here are 5 tips to making your thank you note successful:

    1. Make it professional.

This isn’t a text message or a Facebook post with your friends, so don’t use slang or abbreviations. Address the email formally with “Dear Ms. Hoppenjans” instead of “Hi Jill!” Sign it with “Sincerely” instead of “TTYL.” Remember that this could be your future employer.

    2. Make it grammatically perfect.

Re-read your note several times to make sure it is as perfect as a resume or cover letter. You want the employer to remember you and what you’ve said, not that you misspelled the company’s name!

    3. Make it personal.

You don’t have to send a note to every person you met. Send notes to employers you are really interested in and/or want to stay connected to. Don’t send a mass email to many employers at once. Write an individualized email and try to incorporate the conversation you had with the employer, particularly if there is something about the conversation that might be memorable for the employer.

    4. Make it meaningful.

At a minimum, you are thanking them for attending the fair and for speaking with you. If the employer gave you some next steps (i.e.: apply online, look at their website, talk with another colleague), give them an update on your progress. If you don’t have more to say, don’t add fluff or filler.

    5. Make it easy for the employer.

Attach a copy of your resume so that the employer can be quickly reminded of who you are.

~Jill

World of Work: Allie Schwartz ’11, LinkedIn

Posted on October 22, 2013 with No Comments

Allie SchwartzAllie Schwartz ‘11
Relationship Management Specialist
LinkedIn
New York, NY
Major: Community Entrepreneurship
www.linkedin.com/in/allieschwartz

How would you describe what you do on a typical day?

I build and maintain relationships with our clients. I help ensure our clients see success from our tools and I am constantly in contact with them. I support a team of six relationship managers and all of their accounts. We collaborate to create a strategic plan for their accounts.

Tell us about your path to this position.

If you told me during senior year of college that I would be working at LinkedIn a year after graduation, I would have called you crazy. I spent every summer in college interning to find out what I was interested in. I learned a lot about the corporate world and myself. Through that experience I started to figure out what I liked and didn’t like and what skills came naturally and the ones I needed to work on.

During my senior year, I really started to think about what I wanted to do and who I wanted to be. I knew I wanted to be in the marketing/sales industry, but that was vague. After graduation, I spent three months networking with everyone and anyone to pinpoint what I wanted. In September of 2011, I landed a job at a small digital video branding agency. Because it was so small, I took on a lot of responsibilities and learned a lot.

After nine months, I was recruited by someone at LinkedIn. I never expected to be recruited for a role, I only knew myself as an active candidate. Since starting at LinkedIn, I haven’t stopped learning. Every day there is something new to discover. For me, the learning curve hasn’t stopped. I continuously try to find new ways to learn.

What advice do you have for students searching for jobs or internships in your field?

Three words: network, network, network. That word was said more times in my house than any other word, both throughout my college years and to this day. From the beginning of my college career, my dad encouraged me to connect with different people in all different roles. After meeting with just one person, I would have a list of 3-5 other people to connect with. Each of those people would have a list of people for me to connect with. It was a domino effect. Just because someone isn’t at the company you want to be at, doesn’t mean they don’t know someone who is. You never know who you’re going to meet and who they happen to know. Networking isn’t just about getting a job; networking can help you with becoming a member of a board, getting a new client, a recommendation, grad school and much more.

How did your time at UVM, both in and out of the classroom, prepare you for your position?

My time at UVM prepared me for this position in more ways than I can imagine. In the classroom, a lot of my classes required group projects. In my current role, while I make my own calls, we all collaborate together on tips and strategies, emails that work and that don’t work, we even help each other make calls. Outside of the classroom, it was meeting so many different people. The majority of my friends are from the New England area and all come from different backgrounds. They all have taught me different things and honestly, made my four years at UVM amazing. There isn’t a day that goes by that I don’t reference someone from UVM in some sort of way.

Savvy Seniors: Parting Words

Posted on May 9, 2013 with No Comments

UVM Graduation Ceremony

As you prepare to graduate from UVM, you are probably awash with information and advice. This article from US News Money boils it down to what you really need to know: Tough Love Tips for College Seniors Entering the Job Market

The highlights?

Good news! Employers report they expect to hire 13% more new grads than last year!

Reality check: You are still most likely going to need to work hard to land that first professional position.

Overall message: Own your job search process. It’s yours. The resources are here to support you, but you have to manage your time, seek out support and take concrete steps to achieve your goals.

More good news! As a UVM graduate you are now part of a large community of UVM alumni who connect with and support each other. Be sure to create a profile on LinkedIn and join professional groups such as the University of Vermont Career Connection and the UVM Alumni Association. Start building your connections through networking and informational interviewing.

It’s never too late to start where you are. So take a deep breath, stay calm, and take that next step!

Looking for more advice and tips? Read past Savvy Seniors blog posts.

Best wishes class of 2013!

~Kala

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