Posts Tagged Jobs

Your Own Job Search Syllabus

Posted on January 30, 2014 with No Comments

Illustrated image of class syllabus

As the semester gets underway, assignments, class schedules and long-term projects get your attention.  One course you may not have realized you also have on your plate is Job/Career Prep 101.  It is always part of your load, even after graduation. Managing your career and taking advantage of opportunities continues throughout your life.  Make sure you understand the basics now and treat your professional development like a class or research project.

Here are your assignments:

Weekly Homework: Add Job/Career Prep time to your weekly schedule, even when you have a job or a very full plate.  Taking three small actions a week adds up!

Extra Credit: Take advantage of meeting people, being curious, finding out more ~ be it a conversation in a coffee shop, a follow-up email with a presenter in class, or attending events on and off campus.  Get involved in conversations and activities that will support your own learning beyond your assignments.  It will pay off.

Vocabulary:  Choose language that motivates you! “I gotta get a job” or “I have no clue,” is Eeyore-think.  We can all get discouraged, but don’t get stuck there!  Practice the language of possibility: “I wonder how that person got started;”  “I am going to contact X organization;”  “I am exploring career options “ (vs. being lost).  Keeping positive is essential to moving forward in the world of work.

Final Project: Reflect on what you learned, what the next step is and take action! The 4 Year Plan can support you each year at UVM.

Daunting?  Come drop in at the Career + Experience Hub to meet with a career counselor to help develop your strategy!

~Holly

Welcome the World to Vermont

Posted on January 16, 2014 with No Comments

Drawing of several people surrounding a giant globe

Many want a life with purpose and greater meaning although fear often stops them from taking their next step, whether it is choosing a major of interest or traveling to study and immersing in a new culture or a new way of learning. The growing UVM international population has overcome fear and shown initiative, independence, and ability to be flexible. These are the skills the global community depends on and could shape the international landscapes.

International students in particular have a task of navigating the US and business culture. The coming semester there will be opportunities for all UVM students to learn job skills, hear from experts, and network with professionals in their field.

International students CAN:

  • Get paid to work on campus
  • Join a club and practice communication skills
  • Network with the people you meet on campus and at Networking events and on LinkedIn (the new International Student and Alumni group is a place to start).
  • Participate in one or all of the 3-part Skill Series—check the Career Center calendar

You’ve flown across the world, worked hard for years, learned a tremendous amount and experienced a world you never knew. The Career Center can help you navigate your next professional move. Participate and reach out to build skills to create the life you have been working toward.

~Kim

Savvy Seniors: Find Hidden Jobs (One Senior’s True Story)

Posted on January 8, 2014 with No Comments

Michelle LeungSpring semester of my senior year – stressed out and exhausted, I was bogged down with papers, exams, projects, presentations, work and extracurricular commitments. On top of that, I hadn’t yet secured a job for after graduation. Everything was still up in the air and the next several months were filled with uncertainty.

In April, UVM Career Center and the Tower Society collaborated to host a panel and networking event featuring female business leaders. They were asked to share their wisdom and stories on their career path and professional growth. The advice they gave was invaluable and I found myself taking notes.

After the panel, I approached one of the presenters, a Senior Vice President with Human Resources at State Street. I thanked her for her time and shared my desire to work in Human Resources. Meeting her led me to several interviews and two weeks after graduation, I got the call and was offered a job at State Street Corporation!

Now, as a contract Recruiting Coordinator, my days consist of scheduling interviews, sending out offer letters, posting internal and external job openings, facilitating background investigation, and conducting new hire paperwork appointments.

Who knew attending the Women in Leadership Panel would land me a job at State Street? I certainly did not.

To all seniors who are currently in their job search process – keep your head up and don’t get discouraged! Attend networking events and career fairs when you get the chance, connect with those who work in companies you are interested in, make the extra effort to get to know and understand their business – who knows? You might be talking to your future employer. It happened to me.

~Michelle Leung, Class of 2013
Recruiting Coordinator at State Street Bank

Want to learn more? Join us with special guest The Intervale Center for the next Savvy Seniors Workshop: Finding Hidden Jobs Tuesday, January 21, 12-1pm at the Hub!

How to Negotiate Your Salary

Posted on November 14, 2013 with No Comments

Handshake

This past year, mint.com, a financial planning website, conducted a survey and created an infographic called, “Wage Wars: How Men & Women Negotiate Salaries.” Through their survey they found that 37% of men and only 26% of women negotiate their starting salary after landing a new position. Not only is there a gender gap, but the numbers are substantially low. So, what can you do to help yourself land a job you’re excited about, but most importantly a salary you deserve? Use the 4 tips listed below to help negotiate your next salary:

  1. Research. By using a few different resources, you’ll want to research salaries within your career field and within the geographical area to help you identify a number or range. In addition, you’ll want to consider the number of years of experience you have, the cost of living and how the team can benefit from your skills and experience to meet the need of the job.
  2. Let the employer state their number or range first. Letting the employer state their number first will allow you more room for negotiation, but remember, you’ll have to defend your reasons why you need to counteroffer.
  3. Know your worth, and not just in dollars. You’ll want to consider other “benefits” you can negotiate with including; vacation time, flex time, bonuses, stock options, etc. Regardless, know your worth and have a bottom line.
  4. Keep calm and control of your emotions. Negotiating a salary can be filled with a lot of emotion, so do your best and leave your emotions at the door.

~Danielle

Savvy Seniors: Start “Relationship Building” Today!

Posted on November 7, 2013 with No Comments

Alyson Welch at Machu Pichu

Alumnae Alyson Welch shares her networking experience and advice

What role has networking played in your career exploration and job search?

Networking has played a huge role in my professional development.  Four years ago, I moved to Madrid, Spain and had no idea what I was going to do.  After a few months, I found a job and two internships through networking—through a friend of my mother-in-law, a college contact and a previous internship supervisor.

When we moved back to Vermont almost three years ago, I was concerned about finding a job. I started identifying companies of interest and looking for contacts at these companies.  In three months, I met with four people from Tetra Tech ARD, all referred to me through various contacts (a former UVM professor, a college friend of my husband’s and a friend of a friend that I met at a birthday party.)  When a position opened up at Tetra Tech ARD, I eagerly applied and used the knowledge I had acquired through networking to help write my cover letter and prepare for the interview.

Networking can be a bit intimidating.  What has helped you network effectively?

People are much more willing to share information and provide advice than to give you a job. If you are just looking for information, it’s easier to ask people to chat.

I’m kind of shy, so it’s a little intimidating to me to reach out to people that I don’t know. I’ve tried to challenge myself and send emails or call people, thinking that it’s always worth a shot.  I actually don’t like the word “networking” as it sounds sort of insincere.  I prefer to think of it as meeting people and building relationships that are mutually beneficial. Keeping this in mind makes networking – or relationship-building – more organic and, to me, rewarding.  People were very good to me during my job search and I’ve tried to do the same now that I have a job.

What advice might you give to a senior who isn’t sure how to begin their network?

Keep your request to meet short and simple. Be prepared and have a list of questions ready. Ask people to suggest other contacts. Remember to thank the person. Keep track of who you have met and follow up from time to time.  Try to keep your network alive.  Invite the people you have met to connect on LinkedIn

Also, use LinkedIn to identify UVM alums in your field and reach out to them. Check with professors, co-workers and family/friends to see if they might recommend professional contacts. Think about who is already in your network – maybe your aunt knows someone.  Never doubt the importance of any connection—even if someone is not in your field, you never know who they might know.

The most important thing to do is just start networking.  Once you start, you’ll gain momentum and it can even become fun.  Moreover, I am confident that networking is the best way to ultimately find a job – especially one that you’ll like.

Alyson Welch
Project Manager at Tetra Tech ARD

Want to learn more about networking? Join us for:
Seniors Lunch and Learn: Networking Made Easy!
Wed. Nov 13, 12 pm, the Hub

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