Posts Tagged Grad School

Taking the Grad School Search Offline

Posted on September 26, 2013 with No Comments

Facebook is Killing Meaningfull Communication comic

When students come to the Career Center to discuss their graduate school search, we find that the conversation frequently starts from one of two places. Either students are looking for tools to begin their online search or have researched some programs online and are not sure what’s next.

There is undoubtedly an important role for the Internet in any graduate school search, but there’s an equally important place for conversations with admissions representatives that can help to illuminate information that will not soon be found on a school or program’s website.

It can be scary to consider talking to someone who may ultimately be evaluating your application, but you also want to equip yourself with as much information as you can get before making the all too important decisions about which schools to apply to and which school to attend.

Also, there are real advantages to having a phone or in-person conversation with an admissions representative. You can use such a conversation to express your interest in their program, which may give your application a boost. And by preparing ahead of time and demonstrating high levels of professionalism, you can further impress your schools of interest.

Unsure what type of questions to ask as you continue your graduate school search process? Here are a few ideas to get you started. Continue the conversation by speaking with a Career Counselor during our Drop-In Hours at the Career + Experience Hub in the Davis Center.

Need an opportunity to practice these conversations? Visit the UVM Grad School Fair on Monday, September 30, 2013 from 3:00-5:00 pm in the Livak Ballroom, Davis Center, to speak directly with graduate school representatives.

~Ashley Michelle

To Go or Not to Go: Considering Graduate School

Posted on September 27, 2012 with No Comments

Sunset Crossroads

There are lots of reasons why people choose to go to graduate schools and pursue advanced degrees.  Deciding to go is a complex decision that involves the outlook for increased earnings and deepened learning in a field of study.  Although there are a plethora of reasons why to go, we’ll explore a few good reasons why not to go to graduate school.

An article called “The Five Worst Reasons to Go to Grad School” provides some useful tips for when to avoid graduate school.  Here are the five reasons, paraphrased:

1.  To Fill a Personal Void

You are more than your degrees.  Graduate school is great for people who find their zest from studying particular topics in-depth but doesn’t tend to be an effective patch for the holes in one’s life.

2.  For bragging rights

Graduate school is a hefty undertaking, and it will take time and money.  There are cheaper ways to obtain a positive reputation.

3.  Buying your way into a network

You will join a new network if you go to graduate school, but you are likely already a part of many networks (including the UVM community) and these will grow throughout your career, with or without graduate school.

4.  It’s the only way to get a job

Some jobs do require advanced degrees and some prefer them.  But there are lots of career opportunities for people with Bachelor’s degrees.  Employers want dedicated and skilled workers, and those skills can be developed in a plethora of ways.

5. It’s what to do when you’re lacking direction

Graduate school is not the place to discover your life’s path or career journey.  The strongest graduate school candidate’s know what they want to study and why.  Not with meticulous detailed measure, necessarily, but enough to have a vision for where the process might lead.

Ultimately, the decision to go to graduate school should be based on much reflection and consideration and it is yours to make.  To learn more about the ins and outs of considering and applying to graduate school, visit the Career Services website.

~Ashley Michelle

 

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