Posts Tagged Employers

The Single Most Important Thing To Do After the Job Fair

Posted on October 31, 2013 with No Comments

Thank you note

Write a thank you note.

Why? A prompt and sincere note of thanks helps you stand out among the hundreds of other people the employer met at the fair. It demonstrates that you’re sincerely interested and motivated about their company, it demonstrates your writing skills and it can make you more memorable than any other candidate.

Here are 5 tips to making your thank you note successful:

    1. Make it professional.

This isn’t a text message or a Facebook post with your friends, so don’t use slang or abbreviations. Address the email formally with “Dear Ms. Hoppenjans” instead of “Hi Jill!” Sign it with “Sincerely” instead of “TTYL.” Remember that this could be your future employer.

    2. Make it grammatically perfect.

Re-read your note several times to make sure it is as perfect as a resume or cover letter. You want the employer to remember you and what you’ve said, not that you misspelled the company’s name!

    3. Make it personal.

You don’t have to send a note to every person you met. Send notes to employers you are really interested in and/or want to stay connected to. Don’t send a mass email to many employers at once. Write an individualized email and try to incorporate the conversation you had with the employer, particularly if there is something about the conversation that might be memorable for the employer.

    4. Make it meaningful.

At a minimum, you are thanking them for attending the fair and for speaking with you. If the employer gave you some next steps (i.e.: apply online, look at their website, talk with another colleague), give them an update on your progress. If you don’t have more to say, don’t add fluff or filler.

    5. Make it easy for the employer.

Attach a copy of your resume so that the employer can be quickly reminded of who you are.

~Jill

Is the Job Fair for YOU?

Posted on October 24, 2013 with No Comments

Employer discussing job opportunities with prospective employee

Yes!

Most people know that a Job Fair is for people seeking jobs, internships, and volunteer opportunities.  Did you know it is also for those who want to get ideas, explore options and gather information? You don’t have to be actively searching for specific job to attend.

A key part of the career journey is having conversations, exploring what is out there and practicing presenting yourself and your interests.  You can do all of that at the Job Fair.  You can also learn about companies, industries, jobs, and opportunities.

No matter what your reason for attending, you should come prepared.  Dress professionally. Bring a resume and an impressive handshake.  Why?  Because 100 employers are coming to meet you!

Put the date in your calendar:
Job Fair
Wednesday, October 30, 2013
2:00pm – 5:00pm
Davis Center 4th Floor

Still feeling nervous about attending?

Review the Career Center FAQs and Preparation and Tips. If you want more support, talk to a Career Center staff member.  Quick (10 minute) consults, resume reviews, and questions can be explored during Drop-ins at the Career + Experience Hub, M-Th: 1-4pm and Fr: 1-3pm.

Do more than just wonder about your future.  Explore options. Talk to employers.

~Jill

Savvy Seniors: Resume Writing- Some Things to Consider

Posted on October 3, 2013 with No Comments

KSV logo

Drafting a resume can be daunting, but if you’re not going to take the time to do it well, don’t bother at all. Competition is tough out there, so get it right.

Here are a few things to consider:

Limit the experience you include

Only include the most relevant work experience, the stuff that pertains to job your trying to get.  Each application you write should be tailored specifically to that position.

Make an impression with your verb selection

When describing work experience, choose verbs that pack a punch. Such phrases as “worked on,” or “contributed to,” won’t impress. Lead with something that allows your work to stand out like “ designed,” or “implemented.”

Typos are your worst enemy

Granted we all make mistakes, but no hiring manager is going to be impressed if your resume is ridden with spelling errors. It pins you as careless, even lazy. Take the time to check, double check and triple check your work.  And it never hurt to get a second pair of eyes to go over your stuff.

Formatting is imperative

Are your margins even? Bullets lined up? Have you included dates and headings in a consistent way? Is it easy to read and visually appealing? Be mindful of all these point. Your sloppiness will be noted.

Join us for the next Senior Workshop with special guest the HowardCenter to learn more about how to make your resume shine!

SENIORS LUNCH + LEARN: RESUMES 2.0

Thursday Oct. 10 12 – 1 PM, Career + Experience Hub

~Alexa Mucklow, Social Media Associate
Kelliher Samets Volk

Savvy Seniors: Interviewing

Posted on April 4, 2013 with No Comments

Sailboats on Lake Champlain

Jen Guimaraes
Associate Director
Community Sailing Center

When a student lands an interview, what should they do to prepare?
Students should make sure to do their “homework” on the organization that they are interviewing with. Take the time to familiarize yourself with the entire organization by researching their website and any other information that you can gather about them. Create a list of questions you have about the organization and the position you are applying for. Employers always ask for your questions at the end of the interview process and having a list shows that you did background research and are very interested in the position. Make sure to dress appropriately, show up on time, and be professional in your communication (word choice and email style) with the prospective employer.

You must interview a lot of applicants for the Community Sailing Center, what makes a candidate stand out?
A candidate stands out if they are energetic, upbeat, and already familiar with the organization. Make eye contact with the employer(s) you are interviewing with and give complete answers to their questions, not just one-word responses. You can almost certainly anticipate what questions an employer might ask you based on the position you are applying for, rehearsing your answers ahead of time is always a good idea. Don’t forget to smile!

What questions should candidates be asking you?

I’ve had candidates ask a number of questions: Do I enjoy my job? What is a typical day like for this position? What is the chain of command with direct and indirect supervisors? Are there any additional duties that I will have not included in the job description?

Learn more about opportunities, classes, rentals and more at the Community Sailing Center!

Don’t miss this workshop to learn more! Savvy Seniors: Interviewing Wed., April 10th 4:15pm, L&L E166

After the Job Fair: Insights from an Employer

Posted on March 20, 2013 with No Comments

ECHO Center

Amanda Van Vranken
Volunteer/Intern Coordinator

Echo Lake Aquarium & Science Center

What type of applicant is ECHO looking for while at The Job Fair? When it’s over, what is your next step as an employer?

We are always looking for highly motivated individuals whose unique backgrounds and experiences will contribute to our diversity and strengthen our organization. Volunteers and interns bring experience, leadership skills, and enthusiasm to support our mission. After the Job Fair, we look through resumes and begin a conversation with applicants about what might be the best fit for their skills and interests. Since ECHO’s Internships are very competitive, we are often taking applications for the next semester or beyond.

What should students do to follow up with employers of interest?

I highly recommend students always follow up with ECHO. It’s an advantage to show your commitment to the organization, initiative, organizational skills and follow through by asking if an employer needs more information or what the timeline is for hiring. I always appreciate emails from students who are “Just checking in to say hi and say how much they are looking forward to this opportunity”.

How can a student stand out in the application process?

Anything you can do to set yourself apart is welcome.  Identify your skills and use them – If you have strong interpersonal skills, try to meet staff and volunteers. If you have strong writing skills, present a unique resume and cover letter. Draw on experiences or class work and explain why it has initiated growth and contributed to your skill set.  In addition, mention personal contacts or connections that make your reason for applying compelling.

What if a student wasn’t able to attend the Job Fair or didn’t connect with a particular employer?

Students can always go online to look at ECHO’s (or other organization’s) opportunities, as well as apply on-line or email with specific questions. When applying, be pro-active, know your schedule, and be realistic with your time commitments.

Volunteer or Intern at ECHO

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