Jason Stockwell

Director of the Rubenstein Ecosystem Science Laboratory; Professor of Aquatic Ecology, Rubenstein School of Environment and Natural Resources
jason.stockwell@uvm.edu | stockwelllaboratory.com
802-656-3009
Research interests: Dr. Stockwell's research interests focus broadly on food web dynamics, with specific interests in how animal behavior and environmental conditions affect trophic interactions. He works in systems ranging from small, hyper-eutrophic ponds to large, deep oligotrophic lakes, and on organisms ranging from phytoplankton to apex piscivores. His active areas of research include the influence and impact of diel vertical migration on invertebrate population structure, how cyanobacteria blooms influence energetic pathways, the impact of spatial resource subsidies on winter food web interactions, and the role of environmental disturbance on phytoplankton biodiversity. Learn more about Dr. Stockwell >>

William "Breck" Bowden

Professor & Patrick Chair of Watershed Science & Planning, Rubenstein School of Environment and Natural Resources; Director of Water Resources and Lake Studies Center, Lake Champlain Sea Grant, Northeastern States Research Cooperative Theme 1
breck.bowden@uvm.edu | www.uvm.edu/~wbowden/ | www.uvm.edu/bwrl
802-656-2513
Research interests: Dr. Bowden's research focuses on interactions between hydrological and biogeochemical processes, especially as these processes are influenced by land use practices and land cover characteristics at catchment scales. He works in two different but related areas. In Vermont, his research focuses on management of stormwater impacts from development on urban streams. In Alaska, his research focuses on understanding climate change impacts on arctic streams. In both areas, his research is designed to improve the uptake and use of science knowledge by resource managers, policy makers, and community stakeholders. Learn more about Dr. Bowden >>

J. Ellen Marsden

Professor, Rubenstein School of Environment and Natural Resources
ellen.marsden@uvm.edu | www.uvm.edu/rsenr/emarsden
802-656-0684
Research interests: Dr. Marsden's research is focused on restoration of coldwater fishes and biology of exotic species in the Great Lakes and Lake Champlain. In particular, she has studied the spawning behavior, early life history, and movements of lake trout in the Great Lakes and Lake Champlain, and an introduced population in Yellowstone Lake. Her exotic species research includes understanding vectors of invasion, and developing more effective and ecologically sustainable strategies for sea lamprey control. She is also interested in the effects of lake habitat fragmentation on fish movements and genetic sub-structuring of fish populations in Lake Champlain. Learn more about Dr. Marsden>>

Mindy Morales-Williams

Assistant Professor, Rubenstein School of Environment and Natural Resources
ana.morales@uvm.edu | www.vermontlimnology.com
802-656-8769
Research interests: Dr. Morales' research program focuses on nutrient flux and energy flow via land-water linkages and addresses the role of anthropogenic disturbance and climate change processes in the formation and maintenance of harmful cyanobacteria blooms. Learn more about Dr. Morales-Williams >>

Andrew Schroth

Research Associate Professor in Geology; Research on Adaptation to Climate Change (RACC) - Lake Processes Group Team Leader; Lead Scientist for Vermont-Northeastern Water Resources Network (NEWRNet)
aschroth@uvm.edu
802-656-3481
Research interests: Dr. Schroth is a low temperature geochemist with interdisciplinary research interests spanning the crossroads of geology, chemistry, biology and hydrology. The overarching aim of his research is to describe geochemical processes occurring at the earth’s surface with a general focus on nutrient and pollutant mobility and cycling on present day to glacial/interglacial timescales. Specifically, his goal is to understand how biogeochemical systems are affected by global or regional environmental change such as acid and metal pollution, deglaciation, shifting tree species distribution, evolving atmospheric composition, land use modification and changes in climate patterns. Learn more about Dr. Schroth >>

Clayton Williams

Research Assistant Professor, Rubenstein School of Environment and Natural Resources
clayton.j.williams@uvm.edu | www.vermontlimnology.com
802-656-1718
Research interests: Dr. Williams focuses on how the interactions between humans, land, and water shape the utility and health of our freshwaters. His research explores how agriculture, urbanization, and management practices alter the “microbial ooze” of water. This ooze is partly a form of dissolved organic matter (DOM) that is visible as tea-colored water. Climate change, human activities, and land use change alter the amount and composition of dissolved organic matter, which is changing basal carbon resources in aquatic ecosystems. In other words, humans have altered the taste, flavor, strength, and blend of tea found in streams, rivers, and lakes. Dr. Williams is working towards determining how these changes in the dissolved organic matter impact the function of aquatic ecosystems, contaminant biomagnification through aquatic ecosystems, and the quality of our drinking water supply. Learn more about Dr. Williams >>