Welcome to the Climate Adaptation Resource Database

This is a database for farmers to contribute and access climate adaptation resources.

From here, users:

  • search several different types of resources, including photos, case studies, and grant opportunities;
  • create accounts, and customize personal “one-stop” dashboards;
  • contribute content, ask questions, and stay in touch.

For details about the database, please visit the about page.
Questions about searching, creating an account, or submitting your resource? Email farmclim@uvm.edu or give us feedback here.

Start Your Search

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Most Recent

Nutrient Tracking Tool

Added by Devon Johnson • Last updated February 22, 2020
Author: Tarleton State University
Type: People/services; Tools or calculators
Topic: Drainage; Irrigation; Drought; Precipitation

NTT is a web-based, site-specific application that estimates nutrient and sediment losses for crop and pasture at the field and/or watershed scales. Agricultural producers and land managers can define a number of management scenarios for any given field or area of interest (AOI). NTT will estimate nutrient (nitrogen and phosphorus) losses, sediment losses, and crop yields differences between the...

Farming the Floodplain: Trade-offs and Opportunities

Added by Rachel Schattman • Last updated January 9, 2020
Author: Christine Hatch, Ben Warner, Rachel Schattman
Type: Fact sheets; Scientific summaries
Topic: Extreme weather; Climate science

This two-page research summary addresses the trade-offs rural communities face when increased flooding damages public and private land, and makes farming more risky. The authors also provide a link for teaching resources on this topic. The summary was created by collaborators from UMass Amherst, the University of Vermont, the University of Arizona, and the USDA Northeast Climate Hub.

How does tillage intensity affect soil organic carbon?

Added by Rachel Schattman • Last updated November 25, 2019
Author: Haddaway et al.
Type: Scientific summaries
Topic: Reduce tillage; Adaptation practices

Researchers from MISTRA EviEM reviewed 351 published research studies looking at carbon(C) sequestration in the soil profile under different tillage management systems. They found C stock increases under no-tillage compared to full tillage in the upper soil (0-30 cm) in studies of 10 years or more, while no effect was detected in the full soil profile.

Most Popular

Getting started with drip irrigation: components and costs

Added by Rachel Schattman • Last updated September 27, 2019
Author: Rachel Schattman and Chloe Boutelle
Type: Fact sheets
Topic: Irrigation; Adaptation practices; Drought; Climate science

This fact sheet presents an overview of the most common components and options in drip irrigation systems, accompanied by estimated costs.

Who Needs Irrigation in the Northeast?

Added by Karrah Kwasnik • Last updated November 23, 2019
Author: USDA Northeast Climate Hub
Type: Events and trainings
Topic: Education; Irrigation

This webinar will cover recent and ongoing research designed to help Northeast vegetable producers improve on-farm water efficiency.

How does tillage intensity affect soil organic carbon?

Added by Rachel Schattman • Last updated November 25, 2019
Author: Haddaway et al.
Type: Scientific summaries
Topic: Reduce tillage; Adaptation practices

Researchers from MISTRA EviEM reviewed 351 published research studies looking at carbon(C) sequestration in the soil profile under different tillage management systems. They found C stock increases under no-tillage compared to full tillage in the upper soil (0-30 cm) in studies of 10 years or more, while no effect was detected in the full soil profile.