Topics in script, literacy, books, libraries, cultural expression, preservation, and access from ancient Mesopotamia to the age of printing and the era of electronic information.

Credit(s): 3.00

Political, social, cultural, and literary development of ancient Greece. May be repeated for credit with different content: typically alternates between early period (Bronze Age through Persian Wars) and late (Athenian Empire through Alexander the Great and the Hellenistic World). Cross-listed with: HST 021.

Credit(s): 3.00

The study of English vocabulary derived from Greek and Latin. Topics include analysis of word formation, historical and comparative linguistics, and international scientific terminology.

Credit(s): 3.00

Political, social, cultural, and literary development of ancient Rome. May be repeated for credit with different content: normally alternates between early period (Monarchy and Republic) and late (Empire). Cross-listed with: HST 022.

Credit(s): 3.00

Homeric epics, Virgil's Aeneid, selections from tragedy dealing with the Trojan War and Greco-Roman cultural identity. Examples from art and archaeology supplement the literary theme. Cross-listed with: WLIT 024.

Credit(s): 3.00

Participants describe the Republic's end: Caesar justifies conquest and civil war; Catullus and Sallust reveal a society in turmoil; Cicero documents first-century politics: political gangs, bribery, and violence. Cross-listed with: WLIT 035.

Credit(s): 3.00

Poetry and prose in the first century C.E. (the age of Augustus, Nero, Trajan), emphasizing varieties and limitations of political and literary freedom. Cross-listed with: WLIT 037.

Credit(s): 3.00

Greek myth in literature, art, and music from antiquity to modern times. No prerequisites. Spring semester. Cross-listed with: WLIT 042.

Credit(s): 3.00

An on-site supervised work experience combined with a structured academic learning plan directed by a faculty member or a faculty-staff team in which a faculty member is the instructor of record, for which academic credit is awarded. Offered at department discretion.

Credit(s): 1.00 to 3.00

See Schedule of Courses for specific titles.

Credit(s): 1.00 to 18.00

See Schedule of Courses for specific titles.

Credit(s): 1.00 to 18.00

Political, social, cultural, and literary development of ancient Greece. May be repeated for credit with different content: normally alternates between early period (Bronze Age through Persian Wars) and late (Athenian Empire through Alexander the Great and the Hellenistic World). Prerequisite: HST 009 or appropriate work in Classics. Cross-listed with: HST 121.

Credit(s): 3.00

Political, social, cultural, and literary development of ancient Rome. May be repeated for credit with different content: normally alternates between early period (Monarchy and Republic) and late (Empire). Prerequisite: HST 009 or appropriate work in Classics. Cross-listed with: HST 122.

Credit(s): 3.00

Multidisciplinary survey of seminal Greek and Latin texts in various genres and their reception in later periods in many media, including literature, criticism, philosophy, music, theater, television, and film. Prerequisite: Minimum Sophomore standing.

Credit(s): 3.00

Interdisciplinary introduction to epic poetry and performance, from Gilgamesh and the Homeric poems to the Kalevala traditions of Finland to the griot poetry and music of West Africa. Prerequisite: Sophomore standing. Cross-listed with: WLIT 145.

Credit(s): 3.00

Comparative study of three major ancient legal systems and their roles in their respective societies: ancient Near East (Sumerian to Hittite), Greek, and Roman. Prerequisite: Three credits in Classics, History, Philosophy, or Political Science. Cross-listed with: HST 147, POLS 182.

Credit(s): 3.00

A thematic and historical introduction to the civilization of Ancient Egypt and its cultural position and influence in both the ancient and modern worlds. Prerequisite: Three credits in Classics or History. Cross-listed with: HST 148.

Credit(s): 3.00

Survey of the complex histories and cultures of Mesopotamia, Anatolia, Syria, and the Levant (including Israel and Judah). May be repeated for credit with different content: normally alternates between Bronze Age (3000-1200 BCE) and Iron Age (1200-323 BCE). Prerequisite: HST 009 or HST 021 or CLAS 021 or appropriate work in Classics or History. Cross-listed with: HST 149.

Credit(s): 3.00

Through selected readings spanning over two thousand years traces the trajectory of modern notions of ecological and socio-economic sustainability back through time. Includes experiential component at the Instructor's sheep farm.

Credit(s): 3.00

Plays of Aeschylus, Sophocles, Euripides, and Aristophanes in their historical and cultural setting. Prerequisite: Sophomore standing. Cross-listed with: WLIT 153.

Credit(s): 3.00

Creation and development of genres which the Greeks and Romans used to represent true narratives about people or events, especially the development of historical writing. Prerequisite: Sophomore standing. Cross-listed with: WLIT 154.

Credit(s): 3.00

Homer, Apollonius, and Vergil, as well as readings selected from other Greek and Latin epic (including epyllia) and didactic poetry. Prerequisite: Sophomore standing. Cross-listed with: WLIT 155.

Credit(s): 3.00

Comedy, satire, epigram, and prose fantasy as vehicles for political, social, and literary criticism in the Greco-Roman world. Prerequisite: Sophomore standing. Cross-listed with: WLIT 156.

Credit(s): 3.00

The construction of the status of women in ancient Greek society. Readings include lyric, tragic, and comic poetry, philosophy, oratory, novel, and nonliterary documents. Prerequisite: Sophomore standing; three hours in literature, History, Anthropology, or Sociology. Cross-listed with: HST 157, WLIT 157, WGST 157.

Credit(s): 3.00

History of Greco-Roman political thought and political reality, as revealed by lawgivers, philosophers, politicians, and historians. Prerequisite: Sophomore standing.

Credit(s): 3.00

A survey of Plato's works, including the "early," "middle," and parts of the "late" dialogues. Emphasis will be laid on reading the dialogues themselves. Prerequisite: One course in Philosophy, or one course in Classics (Greek Culture or Greek). Cross-listed with: PHIL 108.

Credit(s): 3.00

An exploration of Aristotle's metaphysics, epistemology, psychology, logic, ethics, and politics, with particular emphasis on reading Aristotle's texts while also sampling modern interpretations of his thought. Prerequisite: Three credit hours in Philosophy or Classics (Greek Culture or Greek).

Credit(s): 3.00

Primary texts of Greek and Roman Stoics (Zeno, Chrysippus, Epictetus, Seneca, Marcus Aurelius) form the backbone of this course, which concentrates on Stoic ethics, psychology, and epistemology, but also covers physics and logic, as well Stoic influence on modern thought. Prerequisite: Three credit hours in Philosophy, or in Classics, Latin, or Greek.

Credit(s): 3.00

An on-site supervised work experience combined with a structured academic learning plan directed by a faculty member or a faculty-staff team in which a faculty member is the instructor of record, for which academic credit is awarded. Offered at department discretion.

Credit(s): 1.00 to 18.00

Undergraduate student service as a teaching assistant, usually in an introductory-level course in the discipline, for which credit is awarded. Offered at department discretion.

Credit(s): 1.00 to 3.00

A course which is tailored to fit the interests of a specific student, which occurs outside the traditional classroom/laboratory setting under the supervision of a faculty member, for which credit is awarded. Offered at department discretion.

Credit(s): 1.00 to 18.00

See Schedule of Courses for specific titles.

Credit(s): 1.00 to 18.00

See Schedule of Courses for specific titles.

Credit(s): 1.00 to 18.00

Undergraduate student work on individual or small team research projects under the supervision of a faculty member, for which credit is awarded. Offered at department discretion.

Credit(s): 1.00 to 18.00

Undergraduate student work on individual or small team research projects under the supervision of a faculty member, for which credit is awarded. Offered at department discretion.

Credit(s): 1.00 to 18.00

Research methods and contemporary issues in the study of classical antiquity; preparation of individual senior projects. Prerequisites: Twelve hours of Classics, Greek, or Latin; Senior standing.

Credit(s): 3.00

Topics examining themes in Ancient history. May be repeated for credit with different content. Prerequisites: Twelve hours in History or Classics minimum Junior standing. Cross-listed with: HST 221.

Credit(s): 3.00

Selected aspects of Near Eastern, Greek, or Roman History (e.g. trade and colonization, imperialism, social and political institutions, cultural and intellectual developments). Prerequisites: Minimum Junior standing; twelve hours of History.

Credit(s): 3.00

An on-site supervised work experience combined with a structured academic learning plan directed by a faculty member or a faculty-staff team in which a faculty member is the instructor of record, for which academic credit is awarded. Offered at department discretion.

Credit(s): 1.00 to 18.00

Undergraduate student service as a teaching assistant, usually in an introductory level course in the discipline, for which credit is awarded. Offered at department discretion.

Credit(s): 1.00 to 3.00

A course which is tailored to fit the interests of a specific student, which occurs outside the traditional “classroom/laboratory setting” under the supervision of a faculty member, for which credit is awarded. Offered at department discretion.

Credit(s): 1.00 to 18.00

See Schedule of Courses for specific titles.

Credit(s): 1.00 to 18.00

See Schedule of Courses for specific titles.

Credit(s): 1.00 to 18.00

Undergraduate student work on individual or small team research projects under the supervision of a faculty member, for which credit is awarded. Offered at department discretion.

Credit(s): 1.00 to 18.00