University of Vermont Historic Preservation Program

HP 200 - History of American Architecture

Robert McCullough

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University of Vermont - Graduate Program in Historic Preservation
HP 200 (Fall - 2018), History of American Architecture
Monday and Wednesday, 3:30 to 4:45, Wheeler 101


HISTORY OF AMERICAN ARCHITECTURE
COURSE SYLLABUS

READINGS:  Required readings will be assigned from the following books, which should be purchased if possible.  The Goldberger book is out of print and has been placed on reserve at Bailey Howe Library. 

1.  Gelernter, Mark.  A History of American Architecture. Buildings in their
     Cultural and Technological Context.
2.  McAlester, Virginia Savage.  A Field Guild to American Houses.  Revised and expanded edition.
3.  Goldberger, Paul.  The Skyscraper.

SUPPLEMENTAL READINGS.  Supplemental readings are not required but are offered as optional sources that provide greater depth regarding their respective topics and that served as key sources in the preparation of class lectures.   Although the Summerson book is not required, it is an excellent reference work and inexpensive, too.

1.  Jordy, William H.  American Buildings and their Architects. Progressive and
     Academic Ideals at the Turn of the Century. Vol. 4.  Garden City, NY: Anchor
     Books, 1976.
2.  Pierson, William H., Jr.  American Buildings and their Architects. The
     Colonial and Neo-Classical Styles. Vol. 1.  Garden City, NY: Anchor Books,
     1976.
3.  Pierson, William H., Jr.  American Buildings and their Architects. Technology
     and the Picturesque, the Corporate and Early Gothic Styles. Vol. 2.  Garden
     City, NY: Anchor Books, 1976.
4.    Summerson, Sir John.  The Classical Language of Architecture.  Cambridge, Massachusetts: M.I.T. Press, 1963.

RESERVE READINGS:  All readings, required and supplemental, are on reserve at Bailey Howe Library.



INTRODUCTION: THE STUDY OF ARCHITECTURAL HISTORY
AND ARCHITECTURAL STYLES.

Class and Date

1.  Monday, August 27th.    Introduction.  A Thematic Approach to the Study of American Architectural History

2.  Wednesday, August 29th.    Prehistoric, Ancient and Medieval America

        Readings:    Gelernter, Foreword, 1-34; McAlester, ix, 1-13, and 65-75.
        Supplemental:      Summerson, 1-56 and plates.



EUROPEAN ARCHITECTURAL VOCABULARY
IN 17TH AND 18TH CENTURY AMERICA

Class and Date

3.  Monday, September 3rd:    Labor Day.  No Class

4.  Wednesday, September 5th:    Colonial England

5.  Monday, September 10th:    Colonial Holland, Germany, Sweden, France and Spain
     Drawing Assignment Due    

6.  Wednesday, September 12th:    Georgian - Early Period

7.  Monday, September 17th:    Georgian – Early and Late Periods

        Supplementary Review, 5:30-6:30: Colonial Remnants / Writing Architectural Descriptions.  Voluntary

        Readings:    Gelernter, 35-96; McAlester, 21-61 and 75-151.
        Supplemental:    Pierson, Vol. 1, 1-201



THE ROOTS OF CLASSICISM IN AMERICA AND THE
EMERGENCE OF AN ARCHITECTURE FOR A NEW REPUBLIC

Class and Date

8.  Wednesday, September 19th:    Classicism: Traditional or Federal

9.  Monday, September 24th:    Classicism: Idealistic or Jeffersonian

10.  Wednesday, September 26th:    Classicism: The Rational Phase

11.  Monday, October 1st:    Classicism: Greek Revival - A National Architectural Style
       Writing Assignment One Due    
        
        Readings:    Gelernter, 97-139; McAlester, 152-197
        Supplemental:    Pierson, Vol. 1, 205-460



ECCLESIOLOGISTS, ROMANTICISM, AND THE PICTURESQUE

Class and Date

12.  Wednesday, October 3rd:    Gothic Churches and the Ecclesiologists in America

13.  Monday, October 8th:    Fall Recess.   No Class

14.  Wednesday, October 10th:    Gothic Revival and the Picturesque Villa and Cottage

15.  Monday, October 15th:    Italian Villa and Italianate; Renaissance, Romanesque, and Egyptian Revivals;
        Octagon Mode

        Supplementary Review, 5:30-6:30.  Voluntary

        Readings:    Gelernter, 139-165; McAlester, 197-237
        Supplemental:    Pierson, Vol. 2, 1-21, 91-455



16.  Wednesday, October 17th:    MID-TERM EXAMINATION



ECLECTIC EXUBERANCE:
THE ARCHITECTURE OF AMERICAN ENTERPRISE

Class and Date

17.  Monday, October 22nd:    The Battle of the Styles: Second Empire and High Victorian Gothic

18.  Wednesday, October 24th:    The Romanesque of Henry Hobson Richardson

19.  Monday, October 29th:    Stick Style, Queen Anne, and late 19th Century Eclecticism

20.  Wednesday, October 31st:    The Shingle Style

    Readings:    Gelernter, 166-189; McAlester, 238-317



URBAN ORDER AMID THE RISE OF COMMERCE

Class and Date

21.  Monday, November 5th:    Classicism Reconsidered: Late 19th and Early 20th Century Classicism: The Ecole des Beaux Arts and
        Classical or Renaissance-Inspired Monumentality.

22.  Wednesday, November 7th:    Period Revivals: English, Dutch and Spanish Colonial; English Tudor; French and Italian
        Renaissance; Spanish Eclectic; and Mission.

23.  Monday, November 12th:    Interludes and the Quest for a New Tradition: Chatequesque; Late Gothic and Jacobean Revivals;
        Eclecticism; and the buildings of Bertram G. Goodhue.

24.  Wednesday, November 14th:    Tall Buildings: The Chicago School

25.  Monday, November 19th:    Thanksgiving Recess – No Class

26.  Wednesday, November 21st:    Thanksgiving Recess – No Class

27.  Monday, November 26th:    Tall Buildings: New York and Corporate Urbanism
     
        Readings:    Gelernter, 190-214; McAlester, 318-385; Goldberger, 1-165
        Supplemental:    Jordy, Vol. 4, 1-177, and 314-374


THE EMERGENCE OF MODERNISM

Class and Date

28.  Wednesday, November 28th:    Arts and Crafts and the American Bungalow
       Writing Assignment Two Due

29.  Monday, December 3rd:     Art Deco and Streamlined Moderne

30.  Wednesday, December 5th:    The Prairie School According to Frank Lloyd Wright

        Supplemental Review.  5:30 to 6:30

31.  Friday, December 7th:    International Style
       4:30 to 5:30.  Voluntary   

        Readings::    Gelernter, 214-292;
        Supplemental:    Jordy, Vol. 4, 180-313


32.  Monday, December 10th:    Final Exam (101 Wheeler)
       4:30 P.M. to 7:15 P.M.

     
COURSE INFORMATION

EXAMINATIONS.  A mid-term examination and a final examination will be given during the semester.  Both exams will consist of slide identifications and essay questions requiring comparative architectural analysis of buildings.  There will be no make-up exams unless a student presents a bona fide reason for missing the regularly scheduled exam.

CLASSICAL ORDERS ASSIGNMENT.  Students will be asked to select any building on campus that employs a classical order (pedestal, column, and entablature) and sketch the specific details of that order, identifying the order and its various parts and moldings.  The due date is marked on the syllabus.  The images are taken from William Salmon’s Palladio Londinensis (1734), on reserve at Bailey Howe Library.  Please refer to that work if the written terms are not fully legible on your photocopy.

PAPERS.  Two papers, each no more than 1500 words in length and based upon criteria distributed by the instructor, will be required.  Papers must be typed and double-spaced and include illustrations.  The first paper focuses on building descriptions, the second on architectural analysis.  Due dates are marked on the syllabus.  Illustrations are required and should be neatly mounted and clearly identified.  Follow the format for footnotes and bibliography given in the Chicago Manual of Style.  Grades will be lowered by one point for each twenty-four hour period that the paper is late.

GRADES.  Grades will be based on the average of the two examinations and three assignments.  Attendance and class participation are also considered.  No additional work is assigned in order to raise a final grade.

BIBLIOGRAPHY.      A bibliography of readings for further study on each of the lecture topics will also be distributed to students.  This list should be considered as a beginning point for research concerning the topics identified and should be consulted during selection and preparation of the papers.

OFFICE HOURS.  Office hours will be announced by the instructor, but if these hours are not convenient, a special appointment can be scheduled.

SLIDE IMAGES.  Students may be asked to identify the buildings, dates of construction, and architects contained in the schedule of slides posted on the course web page.  The address is www.uvm.edu/~rmccullo.  A complete schedule of all slides presented during class periods will also be distributed in hard-copy form as a note-taking aid.  However, only those images contained on the web page will be required material.

FIELD TRIP.  A field trip to Rockingham and Bellows Falls, Vermont, and Harrisville, New Hampshire, the latter an early nineteenth century mill village, will be scheduled.   Attendance is voluntary but encouraged. 

SUPPLEMENTAL CLASSES:  Voluntary review classes or classes covering supplemental material are scheduled at the dates and times listed.