The DendroEcological Network - Providing seamless access to ecological and dendrochronological data

Explore, locate and download dendroecological data

The mission of the DendroEcological Network (DEN) is to provide an online repository for dendrochronological and associated forest ecology data, as well as offer a cyberinfrastructure for the discovery, exploration, and sharing of that data. The data portal is publicly available and anyone with access to the internet can use it and contribute to it. To maintain the rigor of the overall resource, the DEN is currently limited to only accept datasets containing cores that were cross-dated.

Using data you find here? Find out how to cite the data stored here and check out the data use policy.


  • Thumbnail for Project

    Comparative growth trends of five Northern hardwood and montane tree species along elevational transects in Mt. Mansfield State Forest


    Completeness
    Completeness: 100%
    Chronology spans
    1737 to 2012
    Species
    Abies balsamea
    Picea rubens
    Acer rubrum
    Acer saccharum
    Betula alleghaniensis
    States
    VT
    Go to project
    Objectives

    We compared growth trends and response to climate and environmental variables among dominant tree species along elevational gradients at Mt. Mansfield, VT: balsam fir, red maple, red spruce, sugar maple, and yellow birch.

    Data Contents

    Data for 9 Plots, 268 Trees, 479 Cores

    Principal Investigator

    Alexandra Kosiba, Paul Schaberg, Gary Hawley, Shelly Rayback

    Primary Contact

    Alexandra Kosiba

    Laboratory

    Schaberg/Hawley/Rayback Dendrochronology Collaborative

    Project Description

    We set up elevational transects were set up in three of the four watersheds on Mt. Mansfield (Underhill, VT): Brown’s River, Stevensville Brook, and Ranch Brook Watersheds. Along each of these transects, three plots were selected – one within each of the following elevational zones: low (450-650 m asl), mid (750-850 m) and high (900-1000 m) (n plots = 9), which align with northern hardwoods, transition, and montane spruce-fir ecotones. Plots contained 10-14 dominant or co-dominant trees of each of the target tree species with approximately equal distribution around plot center in attempts to avoid differing competition pressures between trees. We sampled red maple, sugar maple, and red spruce at low elevation; sugar maple, yellow birch, and red spruce at mid elevation; and red spruce and balsam fir at high elevation. Due to differential species densities across the landscape, plots were of variable radius.

  • Thumbnail for Project

    Quantifying the legacy of foliar winter injury on woody aboveground carbon sequestration of red spruce trees


    Completeness
    Completeness: 100%
    Chronology spans
    1713 to 2010
    Species
    Picea rubens
    States
    VT, MA, NH
    Go to project
    Objectives

    Red spruce tree cores were collected from 30 plots in VT, NH, and MA to assess the influence of the 2003 winter injury event on long-term growth and C sequestration.

    Data Contents

    Data for 39 Plots, 380 Trees, 756 Cores

    Principal Investigator

    Alexandra Kosiba, Paul Schaberg, Gary Hawley

    Laboratory

    Schaberg/Hawley Lab

    Project Description

    In 2003, a severe region-wide event damaged over 90% of red spruce in the northeastern US. We assessed the influence of the 2003 winter injury event on long-term growth and C sequestration of red spruce trees by measuring the xylem growth (basal area increment) in forest stands in Vermont, New Hampshire, and Massachusetts where winter injury was quantified in 2003. To do this, we assessed dominant and co-dominant red spruce trees in 30 forest plots (10–15 trees per plot) from 14 locations that had been quantified for winter injury severity (visual assessment of damage to current-year foliage, ranging from 0% to 100%) in 2003 (a sub-set of the 27 locations and 176 plots assessed by Lazarus et al., 2004).

  • Thumbnail for Project

    Potential role of soil calcium in recovery of paper birch following ice storm injury in Vermont


    Completeness
    Completeness: 87%
    Chronology spans
    1920 to 2006
    Species
    Betula papyrifera
    Betula papyrifera var. cordifolia
    States
    VT
    Go to project
    Objectives

    To more fully understand the potential causes of birch decline, we assessed crown health, radial growth, and available soil cations at 12 paper birch (Betula papyrifera and B. papyrifera var. cordifolia) sites located in the north-central Green Mountains, VT.

    Data Contents

    Data for 12 Plots, 175 Trees, 350 Cores

    Principal Investigator

    Joshua Halman, Paul Schaberg, and Gary Hawley

    Laboratory

    Schaberg/Hawley Lab

    Project Description

    In 2006, we assessed crown health, radial growth, and available soil cations at 12 paper birch (Betula papyrifera and B. papyrifera var. cordifolia) sites located in the north-central Green Mountains, Vermont, as a preliminary assessment of factors that may be influencing paper birch decline. Selected plot locations overlapped with previous aerial mapping of paper birch decline, and we avoided areas known to have been affected by insect outbreaks in 2004 and 2005. Nine of the sites were located at three different elevations on each of three different mountain-slopes in order to assess tree health and soil nutrition across an elevational gradient. Three plots per site were established within areas known to have experienced moderate ice storm damage in 1998 and 3-4 dominant or co-dominant birch trees closest to plot center were sampled for tree and soil assessments. At higher elevations, sample trees included heart-leafed paper birch. All sites contained dominant and co-dominant paper birch with sugar maple and/or red spruce as companion species. Understory vegetation was highly variable depending on both aspect and elevation, though hobblebush (Viburnum alnifolium) and striped maple (Acer pensylvanicum) were present on most plots. Soils were usually Spodosols with generally well defined Oa, E, and B horizons, except at some upper elevations where soils were either Histosols or Entisols (i.e., no B horizon present).

  • Thumbnail for Project

    Differential impacts of calcium and aluminum treatments on sugar maple and American beech growth dynamics


    Completeness
    Completeness: 75%
    Chronology spans
    1933 to 2008
    Species
    Acer saccharum
    Fagus grandifolia
    States
    NH
    Go to project
    Objectives

    We sought to evaluate the impact of changes in soil calcium and aluminum due to acid deposition on the growth and physiology of sugar maple and American beech trees at Hubbard Brook Experimental Forest (Thornton, New Hampshire) following a major ice storm in 1998.

    Data Contents

    Data for 3 Plots, 180 Trees, 360 Cores

    Principal Investigator

    Joshua Halman, Paul Schaberg, Gary Hawley, Tim Fahey

    Laboratory

    Schaberg/Hawley Lab

    Project Description

    To evaluate the impact of changes in soil calcium and aluminum due to acid deposition, we examined sugar maple and American beech growth and forest composition at Hubbard Brook Experimental Forest (Thornton, New Hampshire) following a major ice storm in 1998. We measured xylem annual increment, foliar cation concentrations, American beech root sprouting, and tree mortality at the experimental nutrient perturbation (NuPert) plots located within HBEF where treatment plots had been amended with calcium or aluminium beginning in 1995.

  • Thumbnail for Project

    Forest condition change in northern Vermont: potential causes and implications for landscape-scale analysis


    Completeness
    Completeness: 78%
    Chronology spans
    1864 to 2010
    Species
    Abies balsamea
    Betula papyrifera
    Picea rubens
    Betula alleghaniensis
    Fagus grandifolia
    Pinus strobus
    Pinus resinosa
    Acer saccharum
    Acer rubrum
    States
    VT, NH
    Go to project
    Objectives

    The purpose of this research was to study the relationship between radial tree growth and vegetation indices derived from Landsat 5 TM imagery in Vermont and New Hampshire.

    Data Contents

    Data for 16 Plots, 253 Trees, 492 Cores

    Principal Investigator

    Aiko Weverka, Jen Pontius

    Laboratory

    Pointus and Schaberg/Hawley Labs

    Project Description

    In this study, the following questions were investigated: 1) Is there a relationship between measurements of basal area increment and vegetation indices derived from Landsat 5 TM data the same year 1984-2010? 2) If these relationships exist, are they stronger for certain vegetation indices, species types, or particular locations? 3) Is there some combination of multiple vegetation indices that can be used to model BAI across the landscape? To answer these questions, we analyzed tree growth for dominant species in Northern Vermont and New Hampshire.

  • Thumbnail for Project

    Red spruce growth comparison: calcium addition and reference watersheds at Hubbard Brook Experimental Forest, NH


    Completeness
    Completeness: 82%
    Chronology spans
    1888 to 2005
    Species
    Picea rubens
    States
    NH
    Go to project
    Objectives

    To compare the effects of calium-addition on red spruce growth dynamics, we examined the annual growth of dominant and codominant red spruce trees growing in the reference and calcium-addition watersheds at the Hubbard Brook Experimental Forest, NH.

    Data Contents

    Data for 6 Plots, 60 Trees, 120 Cores

    Principal Investigator

    Joshua Halman, Paul Schaberg, and Gary Hawley

    Laboratory

    Schaberg/Hawley Lab

    Project Description

    In 2006, we examined the annual growth of dominant and codominant red spruce trees growing in the reference watershed (WS6) and calcium-addition watershed (WS1) at Hubbard Brook Experimental Forest (Thorton, NH) to compare the effects of Ca-addition on red spruce growth dynamics.

  • Thumbnail for Project

    Balsam fir and red spruce growth trends along elevation on Whiteface Mountain, NY


    Completeness
    Completeness: 100%
    Chronology spans
    1769 to 2011
    Species
    Abies balsamea
    Picea rubens
    States
    NY
    Go to project
    Objectives

    This research involved resampling a series of permanent plots established in the 1980's and collecting tree cores from red spruce and balsam fir at many of these sites to identify shifts in tree growth and demography associated with recent environmental changes.

    Data Contents

    Data for 31 Plots, 114 Trees, 219 Cores

    Principal Investigator

    Martin Dovciak, Colin Beier, and Jay Wason

    Laboratory

    Dovciak Lab

    Project Description

    This research involved resampling a series of permanent plots established in the 1980's and collecting tree cores from red spruce and balsam fir at many of these sites to identify shifts in tree growth and demography associated with recent environmental changes. To do this, we studied tree species distributions along elevational gradients on 12 mountains in four states of the northeastern United States (New York, Vermont, New Hampshire, and Maine). See Wason et al. (2017) for more information.

  • Thumbnail for Project

    Assessing relationships between red spruce radial growth and pollution critical load exceedance values


    Completeness
    Completeness: 88%
    Chronology spans
    1825 to 2012
    Species
    Picea rubens
    States
    VT, NH
    Go to project
    Objectives

    We used results from a 30 m resolution steady-state sulfur and nitrogen critical load exceedance model for New England to better understand the spatial connections between calcium depletion and red spruce productivity.

    Data Contents

    Data for 12 Plots, 137 Trees, 256 Cores

    Principal Investigator

    Ben Engel, Paul Schberg, Gary Hawley, Shelly Rayback

    Laboratory

    Schaberg/Hawley/Rayback Dendrochronology Collaborative

    Project Description

    In order to maximize the sample size and range of exceedance values assessed, this study utilized a large set of both pre-existing (Weverka, 2012, Kosiba et al., 2013, Kosiba et al., 2014) and newly collected red spruce xylem increment cores from VT and NH, for a total of 441 trees at 37 sites. These sites included 23 plots chosen to reflect a broad range of red spruce forest conditions (Weverka, 2012, Kosiba et al., 2013, Kosiba et al., 2014) and 14 new plots that were selected using a previously established critical load and exceedence model (NEG/ECP) to identify areas where: (1) red spruce were predicted to occur in the forest type module of the NEG/ECP model, (2) located on state and federal lands to streamline the issuance of collection permits, and (3) at locations where modeled exceedance values approach the positive and negative limits for the study area (−2 and +2 keq ha−1 y−1) to extend and balance the range of values assessed.

  • Thumbnail for Project

    Effects of multiaged silvicultural systems on reserve tree growth 19 years after establishment across multiple species in the Acadian forest in Maine


    Completeness
    Completeness: 76%
    Chronology spans
    1850 to 2013
    Species
    Pinus strobus
    Picea rubens
    Tsuga canadensis
    Acer rubrum
    Thuja occidentalis
    States
    ME
    Go to project
    Objectives

    This study investigated the growth response of mature, isolated reserve trees and their paired analogues from the control in two multiaged silvicultural systems in the Acadian Forest Ecosystem Research Project, ME.

    Data Contents

    Data for 104 Plots, 718 Trees, 715 Cores

    Principal Investigator

    David R. Carter, Robert S. Seymour, Shawn Fraver, and Aaron Weitskittel

    Laboratory

    UMaine Orono

    Project Description

    This study investigated the growth response of mature, isolated reserve trees (n = 528) and their paired analogues from the control (n=190) in two multiaged silvicultural systems in the Acadian Forest Ecosystem Research Project (AFERP).

  • Thumbnail for Project

    Assessment of weather-associated causes of red spruce winter injury and consequences to aboveground carbon sequestration


    Completeness
    Completeness: 88%
    Chronology spans
    1743 to 2005
    Species
    Picea rubens
    States
    VT, NH, MA, NY
    Go to project
    Objectives

    We collected tree cores from red spruce trees at a red spruce plantation in northern NH and 23 forested plots (MA, NH, and VT) to assess the reductions in carbon sequestration that followed a severe winter injury event and explore the possible causes of this event.

    Data Contents

    Data for 24 Plots, 241 Trees, 483 Cores

    Principal Investigator

    Paul Schaberg, Gary Hawley, and Brynne Lazarus

    Laboratory

    Schaberg/Hawley Lab

    Project Description

    We sought to investigate the environmental factors that may contribute to red spruce foliar winter injury and how much this injury influences tree carbon stores. We used a long-term record of winter injury in a plantation in New Hampshire and at 23 forested plots (in MA, NH, and VT) and conducted stepwise linear regression analyses with local weather and regional pollution data to determine which parameters helped account for observed injury.

  • Thumbnail for Project

    Natural disturbance in an old-growth landscape of northern Maine


    Completeness
    Completeness: 88%
    Chronology spans
    1651 to 2001
    Species
    Fagus grandifolia
    Picea rubens
    Acer saccharum
    Abies balsamea
    Thuja occidentalis
    Betula alleghaniensis
    States
    ME
    Go to project
    Objectives

    Our general objective was to reconstruct, using methods of dendrochronology, the frequency and severity of natural disturbances that have shaped an old-growth landscape in northern Maine over the past several hundred years.

    Data Contents

    Data for 37 Plots, 1757 Trees, 1757 Cores

    Principal Investigator

    Shawn Fraver and Alan White

    Laboratory

    UMaine Orono

    Project Description

    We used tree-ring data from 37 plots, randomly located within the TNC’s Big Reed Forest Reserve, to reconstruct the history of natural disturbances in this old-growth landscape.

  • Thumbnail for Project

    Drivers of red spruce and balsam fir tree growth in mountains of the Northeastern US


    Completeness
    Completeness: 100%
    Chronology spans
    1900 to 2012
    Species
    Abies balsamea
    Picea rubens
    States
    NY, VT, NH, ME
    Go to project
    Objectives

    To determine how red spruce and balsam fir tree growth is driven by climate and acidic deposition in mountains of the northeastern United States.

    Data Contents

    Data for 40 Plots, 246 Trees, 246 Cores

    Principal Investigator

    Jay W. Wason, Colin M. Beier, John J. Battles, Martin Dovciak

    Laboratory

    SUNY ESF

    Project Description

    This project integrates with our broader research on montane spruce-fir forest responses to environmental change. In this project, we collected tree cores from red spruce and balsam fir trees along elevation gradients on 10 mountains across the northeastern US. We analyzed the tree rings to determine the extent to which climate and acidic deposition have driven recent tree growth patterns.

  • Thumbnail for Project

    Climate response of co-occurring tree species using tree-rings


    Completeness
    Completeness: 81%
    Chronology spans
    1670 to 2016
    Species
    Quercus rubra
    Quercus alba
    Quercus macrocarpa
    Carya ovata
    Fagus grandifolia
    Liriodendron tulipifera
    Acer saccharum
    Fraxinus nigra
    Juglans nigra
    Quercus montana
    Quercus palustris
    States
    IN
    Go to project
    Objectives

    Compare climate response of co-occurring canopy dominate species. Expected outcomes are that the general response between species will be the same but there will be nuanced differences.

    Data Contents

    Data for 10 Plots, 371 Trees, 669 Cores

    Principal Investigator

    Justin T. Maxwell, Grant L. Harley, Scott M. Robeson.

    Laboratory

    Unknown

    Project Description

    In this project we were interested in comparing the climate response between multiple co-occurring species. While, we found that the general response was to June climate and that soil moisture was the leading driver of growth, we found distinct species-specific differences. The ongoing work aims at determining what drives these differences.

  • Thumbnail for Project

    Growth of canopy red oak near its northern range limit: current trends, potential drivers, and implications for the future


    Completeness
    Completeness: 87%
    Chronology spans
    1866 to 2016
    Species
    Quercus rubra
    States
    VT
    Go to project
    Objectives

    Our objective for this study was to identify the potential climate and pollution variables that have been best associated with red oak growth in Vermont over the past several decades.

    Data Contents

    Data for 11 Plots, 214 Trees, 432 Cores

    Principal Investigator

    Rebecca Stern, Paul Schaberg, Shelly Rayback, Paula Murakami, Christopher Hansen, Gary Hawley

    Laboratory

    Schaberg/Hawley/Rayback Dendrochronology Collaborative

    Project Description

    We measured tree rings for 213 dominant and codominant red oak trees at 11 VT sites, and statistically compared growth to tree and stand characteristics and regional climate and pollutant deposition data. Because red oak wood is ring-porous, exhibiting a bimodal distribution of vessels, xylem growth can be easily partitioned into earlywood (EW) and latewood (LW) growth as well as whole-ring widths (WRW). Therefore, we evaluated relationships between WRW, LW and EW growth and environmental factors that may influence growth.

  • Thumbnail for Project

    NGCP Red Spruce Biogeochemistry


    Completeness
    Completeness: 99%
    Chronology spans
    1677 to 1993
    Species
    Picea rubens
    States
    NY, VT, NH, ME
    Go to project
    Objectives

    Identify points of vulnerability and recovery to atmospheric deposition of pollutants in northeastern red spruce forests.

    Data Contents

    Data for 8 Plots, 273 Trees, 508 Cores

    Principal Investigator

    Kevin T. Smith (NRS), Walter C. Shortle (NRS, retired), Gregory B. Lawrence (USGS)

    Laboratory

    Unknown

    Project Description

    At the invitation of the Northern Global Change Program, coordinated sampling and analysis was conducted for soil chemistry, dendrochronology, and dendrochemistry.

  • Thumbnail for Project

    Eastern white pine and eastern hemlock growth: possible tradeoffs in response of canopy trees to climate and pollution


    Completeness
    Completeness: 100%
    Chronology spans
    1735 to 2016
    Species
    Tsuga canadensis
    Pinus strobus
    States
    VT
    Go to project
    Objectives

    Our objective for this study was to identify the potential climate and pollution variables that have been best associated with eastern white pine and eastern hemlock growth in Vermont over the past several decades.

    Data Contents

    Data for 26 Plots, 507 Trees, 1996 Cores

    Principal Investigator

    Rebecca Stern, Paul Schaberg, Shelly Rayback, Paula Murakami, Christopher Hansen, Gary Hawley

    Laboratory

    Schaberg/Hawley/Rayback Dendrochronology Collaborative

    Project Description

    We measured tree rings for 507 dominant and codominant eastern white pine and eastern hemlock trees at 24 VT sites, and statistically compared growth to tree and stand characteristics and regional climate and pollutant deposition data.

  • Thumbnail for Project

    Growth trends and environmental drivers of major tree species of the Northern Hardwood Forest


    Completeness
    Completeness: 100%
    Chronology spans
    1740 to 2016
    Species
    Acer rubrum
    Betula alleghaniensis
    Fagus grandifolia
    Acer saccharum
    States
    VT
    Go to project
    Objectives

    Our objective for this study was to identify the potential climate and pollution variables that have been best associated with sugar maple, red maple, yellow birch and American beech growth in Vermont over the past several decades.

    Data Contents

    Data for 30 Plots, 688 Trees, 4095 Cores

    Principal Investigator

    Rebecca Stern, Paul Schaberg, Shelly Rayback, Paula Murakami, Christopher Hansen, Gary Hawley

    Laboratory

    Schaberg/Hawley/Rayback Dendrochronology Collaborative

    Project Description

    We measured tree rings for 688 dominant and codominant sugar maple, red maple, yellow birch and American beech trees at 30 VT sites, and statistically compared growth to tree and stand characteristics and regional climate and pollutant deposition data.

  • Thumbnail for Project

    White oak chronologies of the Champlain Valley of Vermont


    Completeness
    Completeness: 99%
    Chronology spans
    1630 to 2016
    Species
    Quercus alba
    States
    VT
    Go to project
    Objectives

    White oak is one of the oldest living tree species found in Vermont, USA. It mainly grows in the Champlain Valley within ecologically significant natural areas such as mesic clay plain forests and dry hemlock-oak forests. This project aims to compile existing white oak chronologies from the Champlain Valley in order to facilitate the sharing of tree ring growth data of this long-lived species. It is our hope to add more Vermont white oak chronologies to this project.

    Data Contents

    Data for 4 Plots, 53 Trees, 108 Cores

    Principal Investigator

    Schaberg, P.G., Murakami, P.F., Hansen, C.F., D’Amato, A.W., and Murray, H.F.

    Laboratory

    Unknown

    Project Description

    This is a collection of white oak cores collected in the Champlain Valley of Vermont. Two trees in this collection can be dated back to 1662 and 1630 with one individual probably originating before the year 1580.

  • Thumbnail for Project

    White oak and red maple tree cores from urban forest patches and reference sites


    Completeness
    Completeness: 97%
    Chronology spans
    1729 to 2015
    Species
    Quercus alba
    Acer rubrum
    States
    NY, MD, PA
    Go to project
    Objectives

    Tree cores were collected to compare growth rates of two important native tree species (white oak (Quercus alba L.) and red maple (Acer rubrum L.)) across urban and reference forest sites of three major cities in the eastern United States (New York, NY (NYC); Philadelphia, PA; and Baltimore, MD).

    Data Contents

    Data for 18 Plots, 170 Trees, 336 Cores

    Principal Investigator

    Nancy F. Sonti, Richard A. Hallett, Kevin L. Griffin, and Joe H. Sullivan

    Laboratory

    Unknown

    Project Description

    Tree cores were collected to compare growth rates of two important native tree species (white oak (Quercus alba L.) and red maple (Acer rubrum L.)) across urban and reference forest sites of three major cities in the eastern United States (New York, NY (NYC); Philadelphia, PA; and Baltimore, MD). Trees were selected from secondary growth oak-hickory forests found in New York, NY; Philadelphia, PA; and Baltimore, MD, as well as at reference forest sites outside each metropolitan area.

  • Thumbnail for Project

    SCBI Forest-GEO Complete Chronologies


    Completeness
    Completeness: 99%
    Chronology spans
    1777 to 2017
    Species
    Carya cordiformis
    Carya glabra
    Carya ovalis
    Carya tomentosa
    Fagus grandifolia
    Fraxinus americana
    Fraxinus nigra
    Juglans nigra
    Liliodendron tulipifera
    Pinus strobus
    Quercus alba
    Quercus montana
    Quercus rubra
    Quercus velutina
    States
    VA
    Go to project
    Objectives

    Trees were cored in 2010, 2011, 2016 and 2017 at the Smithsonian Conservation Biology and Forest GEO large forest site in Front Royal Virginia.

    Data Contents

    Data for 1 Plot, 726 Trees, 726 Cores

    Principal Investigator

    Kristina Anderson-Teixeira

    Laboratory

    Unknown

    Project Description

    The Smithsonian Conservation Biology Institute (SCBI) large forest dynamics plot is located at the Smithsonian’s National Zoo and Conservation Biology Institute in Front Royal, VA, adjacent to the northern end of Shenandoah National Park. The plot is located at the intersection of three of the major physiographic provinces of the eastern US: the Blue Ridge, Ridge and Valley, and Piedmont provinces. The forest type is typical mature secondary eastern mixed deciduous forest, with a canopy dominated by tulip poplar (Liriodendron tulipifera), oaks (Quercus spp.), and hickories (Carya spp.), and an understory composed mainly of spicebush (Lindera benzoin), paw-paw (Asimina triloba), American hornbeam (Carpinus caroliniana), and witch hazel (Hamamelis virginiana). The SCBI forest plot is 25.6 ha (640 x 400 m), including a 4-ha fenced exclosure where white-tailed deer have been excluded since 1990, as well as three 1-ha Smithsonian Monitoring and Assessment of Biodiversity Program (SI-MAB) sites, with some sites surveyed several times since 1990. In 2010 and 2011, over 500 trees were cored in order to establish a baseline of dendrochronological data and gather background on the forest plot. In 2016 the annual mortality census was amended to include coring any tree marked dead. This practice was continued in 2017 when the current chronologies were created.

  • Jump to:

    Abies balsamea
    Acer rubrum
    Acer saccharum
    Betula alleghaniensis
    Betula papyrifera
    Betula papyrifera var. cordifolia
    Carya cordiformis
    Carya glabra
    Carya ovalis
    Carya ovata
    Carya tomentosa
    Fagus grandifolia
    Fraxinus americana
    Fraxinus nigra
    Juglans nigra
    Liliodendron tulipifera
    Liriodendron tulipifera
    Picea rubens
    Pinus resinosa
    Pinus strobus
    Quercus alba
    Quercus macrocarpa
    Quercus montana
    Quercus palustris
    Quercus rubra
    Quercus velutina
    Thuja occidentalis
    Tsuga canadensis

    Abies balsamea

  • Thumbnail for Project

    Comparative growth trends of five Northern hardwood and montane tree species along elevational transects in Mt. Mansfield State Forest


    Completeness
    Completeness: 100%
    Chronology spans
    1737 to 2012
    Species
    Abies balsamea
    Picea rubens
    Acer rubrum
    Acer saccharum
    Betula alleghaniensis
    States
    VT
    Go to project
    Project Contents

    Data for 9 Plots, 268 Trees, 479 Cores

    Principal Investigator

    Alexandra Kosiba, Paul Schaberg, Gary Hawley, Shelly Rayback

    Primary Contact

    Alexandra Kosiba

    Laboratory

    Schaberg/Hawley/Rayback Dendrochronology Collaborative

    Project Description

    We set up elevational transects were set up in three of the four watersheds on Mt. Mansfield (Underhill, VT): Brown’s River, Stevensville Brook, and Ranch Brook Watersheds. Along each of these transects, three plots were selected – one within each of the following elevational zones: low (450-650 m asl), mid (750-850 m) and high (900-1000 m) (n plots = 9), which align with northern hardwoods, transition, and montane spruce-fir ecotones. Plots contained 10-14 dominant or co-dominant trees of each of the target tree species with approximately equal distribution around plot center in attempts to avoid differing competition pressures between trees. We sampled red maple, sugar maple, and red spruce at low elevation; sugar maple, yellow birch, and red spruce at mid elevation; and red spruce and balsam fir at high elevation. Due to differential species densities across the landscape, plots were of variable radius.

  • Thumbnail for Project

    Forest condition change in northern Vermont: potential causes and implications for landscape-scale analysis


    Completeness
    Completeness: 78%
    Chronology spans
    1864 to 2010
    Species
    Abies balsamea
    Betula papyrifera
    Picea rubens
    Betula alleghaniensis
    Fagus grandifolia
    Pinus strobus
    Pinus resinosa
    Acer saccharum
    Acer rubrum
    States
    VT, NH
    Go to project
    Project Contents

    Data for 16 Plots, 253 Trees, 492 Cores

    Principal Investigator

    Aiko Weverka, Jen Pontius

    Laboratory

    Pointus and Schaberg/Hawley Labs

    Project Description

    In this study, the following questions were investigated: 1) Is there a relationship between measurements of basal area increment and vegetation indices derived from Landsat 5 TM data the same year 1984-2010? 2) If these relationships exist, are they stronger for certain vegetation indices, species types, or particular locations? 3) Is there some combination of multiple vegetation indices that can be used to model BAI across the landscape? To answer these questions, we analyzed tree growth for dominant species in Northern Vermont and New Hampshire.

  • Thumbnail for Project

    Balsam fir and red spruce growth trends along elevation on Whiteface Mountain, NY


    Completeness
    Completeness: 100%
    Chronology spans
    1769 to 2011
    Species
    Abies balsamea
    Picea rubens
    States
    NY
    Go to project
    Project Contents

    Data for 31 Plots, 114 Trees, 219 Cores

    Principal Investigator

    Martin Dovciak, Colin Beier, and Jay Wason

    Laboratory

    Dovciak Lab

    Project Description

    This research involved resampling a series of permanent plots established in the 1980's and collecting tree cores from red spruce and balsam fir at many of these sites to identify shifts in tree growth and demography associated with recent environmental changes. To do this, we studied tree species distributions along elevational gradients on 12 mountains in four states of the northeastern United States (New York, Vermont, New Hampshire, and Maine). See Wason et al. (2017) for more information.

  • Thumbnail for Project

    Natural disturbance in an old-growth landscape of northern Maine


    Completeness
    Completeness: 88%
    Chronology spans
    1651 to 2001
    Species
    Fagus grandifolia
    Picea rubens
    Acer saccharum
    Abies balsamea
    Thuja occidentalis
    Betula alleghaniensis
    States
    ME
    Go to project
    Project Contents

    Data for 37 Plots, 1757 Trees, 1757 Cores

    Principal Investigator

    Shawn Fraver and Alan White

    Laboratory

    UMaine Orono

    Project Description

    We used tree-ring data from 37 plots, randomly located within the TNC’s Big Reed Forest Reserve, to reconstruct the history of natural disturbances in this old-growth landscape.

  • Thumbnail for Project

    Drivers of red spruce and balsam fir tree growth in mountains of the Northeastern US


    Completeness
    Completeness: 100%
    Chronology spans
    1900 to 2012
    Species
    Abies balsamea
    Picea rubens
    States
    NY, VT, NH, ME
    Go to project
    Project Contents

    Data for 40 Plots, 246 Trees, 246 Cores

    Principal Investigator

    Jay W. Wason, Colin M. Beier, John J. Battles, Martin Dovciak

    Laboratory

    SUNY ESF

    Project Description

    This project integrates with our broader research on montane spruce-fir forest responses to environmental change. In this project, we collected tree cores from red spruce and balsam fir trees along elevation gradients on 10 mountains across the northeastern US. We analyzed the tree rings to determine the extent to which climate and acidic deposition have driven recent tree growth patterns.


  • Back to Top

    Acer rubrum

  • Thumbnail for Project

    Comparative growth trends of five Northern hardwood and montane tree species along elevational transects in Mt. Mansfield State Forest


    Completeness
    Completeness: 100%
    Chronology spans
    1737 to 2012
    Species
    Abies balsamea
    Picea rubens
    Acer rubrum
    Acer saccharum
    Betula alleghaniensis
    States
    VT
    Go to project
    Project Contents

    Data for 9 Plots, 268 Trees, 479 Cores

    Principal Investigator

    Alexandra Kosiba, Paul Schaberg, Gary Hawley, Shelly Rayback

    Primary Contact

    Alexandra Kosiba

    Laboratory

    Schaberg/Hawley/Rayback Dendrochronology Collaborative

    Project Description

    We set up elevational transects were set up in three of the four watersheds on Mt. Mansfield (Underhill, VT): Brown’s River, Stevensville Brook, and Ranch Brook Watersheds. Along each of these transects, three plots were selected – one within each of the following elevational zones: low (450-650 m asl), mid (750-850 m) and high (900-1000 m) (n plots = 9), which align with northern hardwoods, transition, and montane spruce-fir ecotones. Plots contained 10-14 dominant or co-dominant trees of each of the target tree species with approximately equal distribution around plot center in attempts to avoid differing competition pressures between trees. We sampled red maple, sugar maple, and red spruce at low elevation; sugar maple, yellow birch, and red spruce at mid elevation; and red spruce and balsam fir at high elevation. Due to differential species densities across the landscape, plots were of variable radius.

  • Thumbnail for Project

    Forest condition change in northern Vermont: potential causes and implications for landscape-scale analysis


    Completeness
    Completeness: 78%
    Chronology spans
    1864 to 2010
    Species
    Abies balsamea
    Betula papyrifera
    Picea rubens
    Betula alleghaniensis
    Fagus grandifolia
    Pinus strobus
    Pinus resinosa
    Acer saccharum
    Acer rubrum
    States
    VT, NH
    Go to project
    Project Contents

    Data for 16 Plots, 253 Trees, 492 Cores

    Principal Investigator

    Aiko Weverka, Jen Pontius

    Laboratory

    Pointus and Schaberg/Hawley Labs

    Project Description

    In this study, the following questions were investigated: 1) Is there a relationship between measurements of basal area increment and vegetation indices derived from Landsat 5 TM data the same year 1984-2010? 2) If these relationships exist, are they stronger for certain vegetation indices, species types, or particular locations? 3) Is there some combination of multiple vegetation indices that can be used to model BAI across the landscape? To answer these questions, we analyzed tree growth for dominant species in Northern Vermont and New Hampshire.

  • Thumbnail for Project

    Effects of multiaged silvicultural systems on reserve tree growth 19 years after establishment across multiple species in the Acadian forest in Maine


    Completeness
    Completeness: 76%
    Chronology spans
    1850 to 2013
    Species
    Pinus strobus
    Picea rubens
    Tsuga canadensis
    Acer rubrum
    Thuja occidentalis
    States
    ME
    Go to project
    Project Contents

    Data for 104 Plots, 718 Trees, 715 Cores

    Principal Investigator

    David R. Carter, Robert S. Seymour, Shawn Fraver, and Aaron Weitskittel

    Laboratory

    UMaine Orono

    Project Description

    This study investigated the growth response of mature, isolated reserve trees (n = 528) and their paired analogues from the control (n=190) in two multiaged silvicultural systems in the Acadian Forest Ecosystem Research Project (AFERP).

  • Thumbnail for Project

    Growth trends and environmental drivers of major tree species of the Northern Hardwood Forest


    Completeness
    Completeness: 100%
    Chronology spans
    1740 to 2016
    Species
    Acer rubrum
    Betula alleghaniensis
    Fagus grandifolia
    Acer saccharum
    States
    VT
    Go to project
    Project Contents

    Data for 30 Plots, 688 Trees, 4095 Cores

    Principal Investigator

    Rebecca Stern, Paul Schaberg, Shelly Rayback, Paula Murakami, Christopher Hansen, Gary Hawley

    Laboratory

    Schaberg/Hawley/Rayback Dendrochronology Collaborative

    Project Description

    We measured tree rings for 688 dominant and codominant sugar maple, red maple, yellow birch and American beech trees at 30 VT sites, and statistically compared growth to tree and stand characteristics and regional climate and pollutant deposition data.

  • Thumbnail for Project

    White oak and red maple tree cores from urban forest patches and reference sites


    Completeness
    Completeness: 97%
    Chronology spans
    1729 to 2015
    Species
    Quercus alba
    Acer rubrum
    States
    NY, MD, PA
    Go to project
    Project Contents

    Data for 18 Plots, 170 Trees, 336 Cores

    Principal Investigator

    Nancy F. Sonti, Richard A. Hallett, Kevin L. Griffin, and Joe H. Sullivan

    Laboratory

    Unknown

    Project Description

    Tree cores were collected to compare growth rates of two important native tree species (white oak (Quercus alba L.) and red maple (Acer rubrum L.)) across urban and reference forest sites of three major cities in the eastern United States (New York, NY (NYC); Philadelphia, PA; and Baltimore, MD). Trees were selected from secondary growth oak-hickory forests found in New York, NY; Philadelphia, PA; and Baltimore, MD, as well as at reference forest sites outside each metropolitan area.


  • Back to Top

    Acer saccharum

  • Thumbnail for Project

    Comparative growth trends of five Northern hardwood and montane tree species along elevational transects in Mt. Mansfield State Forest


    Completeness
    Completeness: 100%
    Chronology spans
    1737 to 2012
    Species
    Abies balsamea
    Picea rubens
    Acer rubrum
    Acer saccharum
    Betula alleghaniensis
    States
    VT
    Go to project
    Project Contents

    Data for 9 Plots, 268 Trees, 479 Cores

    Principal Investigator

    Alexandra Kosiba, Paul Schaberg, Gary Hawley, Shelly Rayback

    Primary Contact

    Alexandra Kosiba

    Laboratory

    Schaberg/Hawley/Rayback Dendrochronology Collaborative

    Project Description

    We set up elevational transects were set up in three of the four watersheds on Mt. Mansfield (Underhill, VT): Brown’s River, Stevensville Brook, and Ranch Brook Watersheds. Along each of these transects, three plots were selected – one within each of the following elevational zones: low (450-650 m asl), mid (750-850 m) and high (900-1000 m) (n plots = 9), which align with northern hardwoods, transition, and montane spruce-fir ecotones. Plots contained 10-14 dominant or co-dominant trees of each of the target tree species with approximately equal distribution around plot center in attempts to avoid differing competition pressures between trees. We sampled red maple, sugar maple, and red spruce at low elevation; sugar maple, yellow birch, and red spruce at mid elevation; and red spruce and balsam fir at high elevation. Due to differential species densities across the landscape, plots were of variable radius.

  • Thumbnail for Project

    Differential impacts of calcium and aluminum treatments on sugar maple and American beech growth dynamics


    Completeness
    Completeness: 75%
    Chronology spans
    1933 to 2008
    Species
    Acer saccharum
    Fagus grandifolia
    States
    NH
    Go to project
    Project Contents

    Data for 3 Plots, 180 Trees, 360 Cores

    Principal Investigator

    Joshua Halman, Paul Schaberg, Gary Hawley, Tim Fahey

    Laboratory

    Schaberg/Hawley Lab

    Project Description

    To evaluate the impact of changes in soil calcium and aluminum due to acid deposition, we examined sugar maple and American beech growth and forest composition at Hubbard Brook Experimental Forest (Thornton, New Hampshire) following a major ice storm in 1998. We measured xylem annual increment, foliar cation concentrations, American beech root sprouting, and tree mortality at the experimental nutrient perturbation (NuPert) plots located within HBEF where treatment plots had been amended with calcium or aluminium beginning in 1995.

  • Thumbnail for Project

    Forest condition change in northern Vermont: potential causes and implications for landscape-scale analysis


    Completeness
    Completeness: 78%
    Chronology spans
    1864 to 2010
    Species
    Abies balsamea
    Betula papyrifera
    Picea rubens
    Betula alleghaniensis
    Fagus grandifolia
    Pinus strobus
    Pinus resinosa
    Acer saccharum
    Acer rubrum
    States
    VT, NH
    Go to project
    Project Contents

    Data for 16 Plots, 253 Trees, 492 Cores

    Principal Investigator

    Aiko Weverka, Jen Pontius

    Laboratory

    Pointus and Schaberg/Hawley Labs

    Project Description

    In this study, the following questions were investigated: 1) Is there a relationship between measurements of basal area increment and vegetation indices derived from Landsat 5 TM data the same year 1984-2010? 2) If these relationships exist, are they stronger for certain vegetation indices, species types, or particular locations? 3) Is there some combination of multiple vegetation indices that can be used to model BAI across the landscape? To answer these questions, we analyzed tree growth for dominant species in Northern Vermont and New Hampshire.

  • Thumbnail for Project

    Natural disturbance in an old-growth landscape of northern Maine


    Completeness
    Completeness: 88%
    Chronology spans
    1651 to 2001
    Species
    Fagus grandifolia
    Picea rubens
    Acer saccharum
    Abies balsamea
    Thuja occidentalis
    Betula alleghaniensis
    States
    ME
    Go to project
    Project Contents

    Data for 37 Plots, 1757 Trees, 1757 Cores

    Principal Investigator

    Shawn Fraver and Alan White

    Laboratory

    UMaine Orono

    Project Description

    We used tree-ring data from 37 plots, randomly located within the TNC’s Big Reed Forest Reserve, to reconstruct the history of natural disturbances in this old-growth landscape.

  • Thumbnail for Project

    Climate response of co-occurring tree species using tree-rings


    Completeness
    Completeness: 81%
    Chronology spans
    1670 to 2016
    Species
    Quercus rubra
    Quercus alba
    Quercus macrocarpa
    Carya ovata
    Fagus grandifolia
    Liriodendron tulipifera
    Acer saccharum
    Fraxinus nigra
    Juglans nigra
    Quercus montana
    Quercus palustris
    States
    IN
    Go to project
    Project Contents

    Data for 10 Plots, 371 Trees, 669 Cores

    Principal Investigator

    Justin T. Maxwell, Grant L. Harley, Scott M. Robeson.

    Laboratory

    Unknown

    Project Description

    In this project we were interested in comparing the climate response between multiple co-occurring species. While, we found that the general response was to June climate and that soil moisture was the leading driver of growth, we found distinct species-specific differences. The ongoing work aims at determining what drives these differences.

  • Thumbnail for Project

    Growth trends and environmental drivers of major tree species of the Northern Hardwood Forest


    Completeness
    Completeness: 100%
    Chronology spans
    1740 to 2016
    Species
    Acer rubrum
    Betula alleghaniensis
    Fagus grandifolia
    Acer saccharum
    States
    VT
    Go to project
    Project Contents

    Data for 30 Plots, 688 Trees, 4095 Cores

    Principal Investigator

    Rebecca Stern, Paul Schaberg, Shelly Rayback, Paula Murakami, Christopher Hansen, Gary Hawley

    Laboratory

    Schaberg/Hawley/Rayback Dendrochronology Collaborative

    Project Description

    We measured tree rings for 688 dominant and codominant sugar maple, red maple, yellow birch and American beech trees at 30 VT sites, and statistically compared growth to tree and stand characteristics and regional climate and pollutant deposition data.


  • Back to Top

    Betula alleghaniensis

  • Thumbnail for Project

    Comparative growth trends of five Northern hardwood and montane tree species along elevational transects in Mt. Mansfield State Forest


    Completeness
    Completeness: 100%
    Chronology spans
    1737 to 2012
    Species
    Abies balsamea
    Picea rubens
    Acer rubrum
    Acer saccharum
    Betula alleghaniensis
    States
    VT
    Go to project
    Project Contents

    Data for 9 Plots, 268 Trees, 479 Cores

    Principal Investigator

    Alexandra Kosiba, Paul Schaberg, Gary Hawley, Shelly Rayback

    Primary Contact

    Alexandra Kosiba

    Laboratory

    Schaberg/Hawley/Rayback Dendrochronology Collaborative

    Project Description

    We set up elevational transects were set up in three of the four watersheds on Mt. Mansfield (Underhill, VT): Brown’s River, Stevensville Brook, and Ranch Brook Watersheds. Along each of these transects, three plots were selected – one within each of the following elevational zones: low (450-650 m asl), mid (750-850 m) and high (900-1000 m) (n plots = 9), which align with northern hardwoods, transition, and montane spruce-fir ecotones. Plots contained 10-14 dominant or co-dominant trees of each of the target tree species with approximately equal distribution around plot center in attempts to avoid differing competition pressures between trees. We sampled red maple, sugar maple, and red spruce at low elevation; sugar maple, yellow birch, and red spruce at mid elevation; and red spruce and balsam fir at high elevation. Due to differential species densities across the landscape, plots were of variable radius.

  • Thumbnail for Project

    Forest condition change in northern Vermont: potential causes and implications for landscape-scale analysis


    Completeness
    Completeness: 78%
    Chronology spans
    1864 to 2010
    Species
    Abies balsamea
    Betula papyrifera
    Picea rubens
    Betula alleghaniensis
    Fagus grandifolia
    Pinus strobus
    Pinus resinosa
    Acer saccharum
    Acer rubrum
    States
    VT, NH
    Go to project
    Project Contents

    Data for 16 Plots, 253 Trees, 492 Cores

    Principal Investigator

    Aiko Weverka, Jen Pontius

    Laboratory

    Pointus and Schaberg/Hawley Labs

    Project Description

    In this study, the following questions were investigated: 1) Is there a relationship between measurements of basal area increment and vegetation indices derived from Landsat 5 TM data the same year 1984-2010? 2) If these relationships exist, are they stronger for certain vegetation indices, species types, or particular locations? 3) Is there some combination of multiple vegetation indices that can be used to model BAI across the landscape? To answer these questions, we analyzed tree growth for dominant species in Northern Vermont and New Hampshire.

  • Thumbnail for Project

    Natural disturbance in an old-growth landscape of northern Maine


    Completeness
    Completeness: 88%
    Chronology spans
    1651 to 2001
    Species
    Fagus grandifolia
    Picea rubens
    Acer saccharum
    Abies balsamea
    Thuja occidentalis
    Betula alleghaniensis
    States
    ME
    Go to project
    Project Contents

    Data for 37 Plots, 1757 Trees, 1757 Cores

    Principal Investigator

    Shawn Fraver and Alan White

    Laboratory

    UMaine Orono

    Project Description

    We used tree-ring data from 37 plots, randomly located within the TNC’s Big Reed Forest Reserve, to reconstruct the history of natural disturbances in this old-growth landscape.

  • Thumbnail for Project

    Growth trends and environmental drivers of major tree species of the Northern Hardwood Forest


    Completeness
    Completeness: 100%
    Chronology spans
    1740 to 2016
    Species
    Acer rubrum
    Betula alleghaniensis
    Fagus grandifolia
    Acer saccharum
    States
    VT
    Go to project
    Project Contents

    Data for 30 Plots, 688 Trees, 4095 Cores

    Principal Investigator

    Rebecca Stern, Paul Schaberg, Shelly Rayback, Paula Murakami, Christopher Hansen, Gary Hawley

    Laboratory

    Schaberg/Hawley/Rayback Dendrochronology Collaborative

    Project Description

    We measured tree rings for 688 dominant and codominant sugar maple, red maple, yellow birch and American beech trees at 30 VT sites, and statistically compared growth to tree and stand characteristics and regional climate and pollutant deposition data.


  • Back to Top

    Betula papyrifera

  • Thumbnail for Project

    Potential role of soil calcium in recovery of paper birch following ice storm injury in Vermont


    Completeness
    Completeness: 87%
    Chronology spans
    1920 to 2006
    Species
    Betula papyrifera
    Betula papyrifera var. cordifolia
    States
    VT
    Go to project
    Project Contents

    Data for 12 Plots, 175 Trees, 350 Cores

    Principal Investigator

    Joshua Halman, Paul Schaberg, and Gary Hawley

    Laboratory

    Schaberg/Hawley Lab

    Project Description

    In 2006, we assessed crown health, radial growth, and available soil cations at 12 paper birch (Betula papyrifera and B. papyrifera var. cordifolia) sites located in the north-central Green Mountains, Vermont, as a preliminary assessment of factors that may be influencing paper birch decline. Selected plot locations overlapped with previous aerial mapping of paper birch decline, and we avoided areas known to have been affected by insect outbreaks in 2004 and 2005. Nine of the sites were located at three different elevations on each of three different mountain-slopes in order to assess tree health and soil nutrition across an elevational gradient. Three plots per site were established within areas known to have experienced moderate ice storm damage in 1998 and 3-4 dominant or co-dominant birch trees closest to plot center were sampled for tree and soil assessments. At higher elevations, sample trees included heart-leafed paper birch. All sites contained dominant and co-dominant paper birch with sugar maple and/or red spruce as companion species. Understory vegetation was highly variable depending on both aspect and elevation, though hobblebush (Viburnum alnifolium) and striped maple (Acer pensylvanicum) were present on most plots. Soils were usually Spodosols with generally well defined Oa, E, and B horizons, except at some upper elevations where soils were either Histosols or Entisols (i.e., no B horizon present).

  • Thumbnail for Project

    Forest condition change in northern Vermont: potential causes and implications for landscape-scale analysis


    Completeness
    Completeness: 78%
    Chronology spans
    1864 to 2010
    Species
    Abies balsamea
    Betula papyrifera
    Picea rubens
    Betula alleghaniensis
    Fagus grandifolia
    Pinus strobus
    Pinus resinosa
    Acer saccharum
    Acer rubrum
    States
    VT, NH
    Go to project
    Project Contents

    Data for 16 Plots, 253 Trees, 492 Cores

    Principal Investigator

    Aiko Weverka, Jen Pontius

    Laboratory

    Pointus and Schaberg/Hawley Labs

    Project Description

    In this study, the following questions were investigated: 1) Is there a relationship between measurements of basal area increment and vegetation indices derived from Landsat 5 TM data the same year 1984-2010? 2) If these relationships exist, are they stronger for certain vegetation indices, species types, or particular locations? 3) Is there some combination of multiple vegetation indices that can be used to model BAI across the landscape? To answer these questions, we analyzed tree growth for dominant species in Northern Vermont and New Hampshire.


  • Back to Top

    Betula papyrifera var. cordifolia

  • Thumbnail for Project

    Potential role of soil calcium in recovery of paper birch following ice storm injury in Vermont


    Completeness
    Completeness: 87%
    Chronology spans
    1920 to 2006
    Species
    Betula papyrifera
    Betula papyrifera var. cordifolia
    States
    VT
    Go to project
    Project Contents

    Data for 12 Plots, 175 Trees, 350 Cores

    Principal Investigator

    Joshua Halman, Paul Schaberg, and Gary Hawley

    Laboratory

    Schaberg/Hawley Lab

    Project Description

    In 2006, we assessed crown health, radial growth, and available soil cations at 12 paper birch (Betula papyrifera and B. papyrifera var. cordifolia) sites located in the north-central Green Mountains, Vermont, as a preliminary assessment of factors that may be influencing paper birch decline. Selected plot locations overlapped with previous aerial mapping of paper birch decline, and we avoided areas known to have been affected by insect outbreaks in 2004 and 2005. Nine of the sites were located at three different elevations on each of three different mountain-slopes in order to assess tree health and soil nutrition across an elevational gradient. Three plots per site were established within areas known to have experienced moderate ice storm damage in 1998 and 3-4 dominant or co-dominant birch trees closest to plot center were sampled for tree and soil assessments. At higher elevations, sample trees included heart-leafed paper birch. All sites contained dominant and co-dominant paper birch with sugar maple and/or red spruce as companion species. Understory vegetation was highly variable depending on both aspect and elevation, though hobblebush (Viburnum alnifolium) and striped maple (Acer pensylvanicum) were present on most plots. Soils were usually Spodosols with generally well defined Oa, E, and B horizons, except at some upper elevations where soils were either Histosols or Entisols (i.e., no B horizon present).


  • Back to Top

    Carya cordiformis

  • Thumbnail for Project

    SCBI Forest-GEO Complete Chronologies


    Completeness
    Completeness: 99%
    Chronology spans
    1777 to 2017
    Species
    Carya cordiformis
    Carya glabra
    Carya ovalis
    Carya tomentosa
    Fagus grandifolia
    Fraxinus americana
    Fraxinus nigra
    Juglans nigra
    Liliodendron tulipifera
    Pinus strobus
    Quercus alba
    Quercus montana
    Quercus rubra
    Quercus velutina
    States
    VA
    Go to project
    Project Contents

    Data for 1 Plot, 726 Trees, 726 Cores

    Principal Investigator

    Kristina Anderson-Teixeira

    Laboratory

    Unknown

    Project Description

    The Smithsonian Conservation Biology Institute (SCBI) large forest dynamics plot is located at the Smithsonian’s National Zoo and Conservation Biology Institute in Front Royal, VA, adjacent to the northern end of Shenandoah National Park. The plot is located at the intersection of three of the major physiographic provinces of the eastern US: the Blue Ridge, Ridge and Valley, and Piedmont provinces. The forest type is typical mature secondary eastern mixed deciduous forest, with a canopy dominated by tulip poplar (Liriodendron tulipifera), oaks (Quercus spp.), and hickories (Carya spp.), and an understory composed mainly of spicebush (Lindera benzoin), paw-paw (Asimina triloba), American hornbeam (Carpinus caroliniana), and witch hazel (Hamamelis virginiana). The SCBI forest plot is 25.6 ha (640 x 400 m), including a 4-ha fenced exclosure where white-tailed deer have been excluded since 1990, as well as three 1-ha Smithsonian Monitoring and Assessment of Biodiversity Program (SI-MAB) sites, with some sites surveyed several times since 1990. In 2010 and 2011, over 500 trees were cored in order to establish a baseline of dendrochronological data and gather background on the forest plot. In 2016 the annual mortality census was amended to include coring any tree marked dead. This practice was continued in 2017 when the current chronologies were created.


  • Back to Top

    Carya glabra

  • Thumbnail for Project

    SCBI Forest-GEO Complete Chronologies


    Completeness
    Completeness: 99%
    Chronology spans
    1777 to 2017
    Species
    Carya cordiformis
    Carya glabra
    Carya ovalis
    Carya tomentosa
    Fagus grandifolia
    Fraxinus americana
    Fraxinus nigra
    Juglans nigra
    Liliodendron tulipifera
    Pinus strobus
    Quercus alba
    Quercus montana
    Quercus rubra
    Quercus velutina
    States
    VA
    Go to project
    Project Contents

    Data for 1 Plot, 726 Trees, 726 Cores

    Principal Investigator

    Kristina Anderson-Teixeira

    Laboratory

    Unknown

    Project Description

    The Smithsonian Conservation Biology Institute (SCBI) large forest dynamics plot is located at the Smithsonian’s National Zoo and Conservation Biology Institute in Front Royal, VA, adjacent to the northern end of Shenandoah National Park. The plot is located at the intersection of three of the major physiographic provinces of the eastern US: the Blue Ridge, Ridge and Valley, and Piedmont provinces. The forest type is typical mature secondary eastern mixed deciduous forest, with a canopy dominated by tulip poplar (Liriodendron tulipifera), oaks (Quercus spp.), and hickories (Carya spp.), and an understory composed mainly of spicebush (Lindera benzoin), paw-paw (Asimina triloba), American hornbeam (Carpinus caroliniana), and witch hazel (Hamamelis virginiana). The SCBI forest plot is 25.6 ha (640 x 400 m), including a 4-ha fenced exclosure where white-tailed deer have been excluded since 1990, as well as three 1-ha Smithsonian Monitoring and Assessment of Biodiversity Program (SI-MAB) sites, with some sites surveyed several times since 1990. In 2010 and 2011, over 500 trees were cored in order to establish a baseline of dendrochronological data and gather background on the forest plot. In 2016 the annual mortality census was amended to include coring any tree marked dead. This practice was continued in 2017 when the current chronologies were created.


  • Back to Top

    Carya ovalis

  • Thumbnail for Project

    SCBI Forest-GEO Complete Chronologies


    Completeness
    Completeness: 99%
    Chronology spans
    1777 to 2017
    Species
    Carya cordiformis
    Carya glabra
    Carya ovalis
    Carya tomentosa
    Fagus grandifolia
    Fraxinus americana
    Fraxinus nigra
    Juglans nigra
    Liliodendron tulipifera
    Pinus strobus
    Quercus alba
    Quercus montana
    Quercus rubra
    Quercus velutina
    States
    VA
    Go to project
    Project Contents

    Data for 1 Plot, 726 Trees, 726 Cores

    Principal Investigator

    Kristina Anderson-Teixeira

    Laboratory

    Unknown

    Project Description

    The Smithsonian Conservation Biology Institute (SCBI) large forest dynamics plot is located at the Smithsonian’s National Zoo and Conservation Biology Institute in Front Royal, VA, adjacent to the northern end of Shenandoah National Park. The plot is located at the intersection of three of the major physiographic provinces of the eastern US: the Blue Ridge, Ridge and Valley, and Piedmont provinces. The forest type is typical mature secondary eastern mixed deciduous forest, with a canopy dominated by tulip poplar (Liriodendron tulipifera), oaks (Quercus spp.), and hickories (Carya spp.), and an understory composed mainly of spicebush (Lindera benzoin), paw-paw (Asimina triloba), American hornbeam (Carpinus caroliniana), and witch hazel (Hamamelis virginiana). The SCBI forest plot is 25.6 ha (640 x 400 m), including a 4-ha fenced exclosure where white-tailed deer have been excluded since 1990, as well as three 1-ha Smithsonian Monitoring and Assessment of Biodiversity Program (SI-MAB) sites, with some sites surveyed several times since 1990. In 2010 and 2011, over 500 trees were cored in order to establish a baseline of dendrochronological data and gather background on the forest plot. In 2016 the annual mortality census was amended to include coring any tree marked dead. This practice was continued in 2017 when the current chronologies were created.


  • Back to Top

    Carya ovata

  • Thumbnail for Project

    Climate response of co-occurring tree species using tree-rings


    Completeness
    Completeness: 81%
    Chronology spans
    1670 to 2016
    Species
    Quercus rubra
    Quercus alba
    Quercus macrocarpa
    Carya ovata
    Fagus grandifolia
    Liriodendron tulipifera
    Acer saccharum
    Fraxinus nigra
    Juglans nigra
    Quercus montana
    Quercus palustris
    States
    IN
    Go to project
    Project Contents

    Data for 10 Plots, 371 Trees, 669 Cores

    Principal Investigator

    Justin T. Maxwell, Grant L. Harley, Scott M. Robeson.

    Laboratory

    Unknown

    Project Description

    In this project we were interested in comparing the climate response between multiple co-occurring species. While, we found that the general response was to June climate and that soil moisture was the leading driver of growth, we found distinct species-specific differences. The ongoing work aims at determining what drives these differences.


  • Back to Top

    Carya tomentosa

  • Thumbnail for Project

    SCBI Forest-GEO Complete Chronologies


    Completeness
    Completeness: 99%
    Chronology spans
    1777 to 2017
    Species
    Carya cordiformis
    Carya glabra
    Carya ovalis
    Carya tomentosa
    Fagus grandifolia
    Fraxinus americana
    Fraxinus nigra
    Juglans nigra
    Liliodendron tulipifera
    Pinus strobus
    Quercus alba
    Quercus montana
    Quercus rubra
    Quercus velutina
    States
    VA
    Go to project
    Project Contents

    Data for 1 Plot, 726 Trees, 726 Cores

    Principal Investigator

    Kristina Anderson-Teixeira

    Laboratory

    Unknown

    Project Description

    The Smithsonian Conservation Biology Institute (SCBI) large forest dynamics plot is located at the Smithsonian’s National Zoo and Conservation Biology Institute in Front Royal, VA, adjacent to the northern end of Shenandoah National Park. The plot is located at the intersection of three of the major physiographic provinces of the eastern US: the Blue Ridge, Ridge and Valley, and Piedmont provinces. The forest type is typical mature secondary eastern mixed deciduous forest, with a canopy dominated by tulip poplar (Liriodendron tulipifera), oaks (Quercus spp.), and hickories (Carya spp.), and an understory composed mainly of spicebush (Lindera benzoin), paw-paw (Asimina triloba), American hornbeam (Carpinus caroliniana), and witch hazel (Hamamelis virginiana). The SCBI forest plot is 25.6 ha (640 x 400 m), including a 4-ha fenced exclosure where white-tailed deer have been excluded since 1990, as well as three 1-ha Smithsonian Monitoring and Assessment of Biodiversity Program (SI-MAB) sites, with some sites surveyed several times since 1990. In 2010 and 2011, over 500 trees were cored in order to establish a baseline of dendrochronological data and gather background on the forest plot. In 2016 the annual mortality census was amended to include coring any tree marked dead. This practice was continued in 2017 when the current chronologies were created.


  • Back to Top

    Fagus grandifolia

  • Thumbnail for Project

    Differential impacts of calcium and aluminum treatments on sugar maple and American beech growth dynamics


    Completeness
    Completeness: 75%
    Chronology spans
    1933 to 2008
    Species
    Acer saccharum
    Fagus grandifolia
    States
    NH
    Go to project
    Project Contents

    Data for 3 Plots, 180 Trees, 360 Cores

    Principal Investigator

    Joshua Halman, Paul Schaberg, Gary Hawley, Tim Fahey

    Laboratory

    Schaberg/Hawley Lab

    Project Description

    To evaluate the impact of changes in soil calcium and aluminum due to acid deposition, we examined sugar maple and American beech growth and forest composition at Hubbard Brook Experimental Forest (Thornton, New Hampshire) following a major ice storm in 1998. We measured xylem annual increment, foliar cation concentrations, American beech root sprouting, and tree mortality at the experimental nutrient perturbation (NuPert) plots located within HBEF where treatment plots had been amended with calcium or aluminium beginning in 1995.

  • Thumbnail for Project

    Forest condition change in northern Vermont: potential causes and implications for landscape-scale analysis


    Completeness
    Completeness: 78%
    Chronology spans
    1864 to 2010
    Species
    Abies balsamea
    Betula papyrifera
    Picea rubens
    Betula alleghaniensis
    Fagus grandifolia
    Pinus strobus
    Pinus resinosa
    Acer saccharum
    Acer rubrum
    States
    VT, NH
    Go to project
    Project Contents

    Data for 16 Plots, 253 Trees, 492 Cores

    Principal Investigator

    Aiko Weverka, Jen Pontius

    Laboratory

    Pointus and Schaberg/Hawley Labs

    Project Description

    In this study, the following questions were investigated: 1) Is there a relationship between measurements of basal area increment and vegetation indices derived from Landsat 5 TM data the same year 1984-2010? 2) If these relationships exist, are they stronger for certain vegetation indices, species types, or particular locations? 3) Is there some combination of multiple vegetation indices that can be used to model BAI across the landscape? To answer these questions, we analyzed tree growth for dominant species in Northern Vermont and New Hampshire.

  • Thumbnail for Project

    Natural disturbance in an old-growth landscape of northern Maine


    Completeness
    Completeness: 88%
    Chronology spans
    1651 to 2001
    Species
    Fagus grandifolia
    Picea rubens
    Acer saccharum
    Abies balsamea
    Thuja occidentalis
    Betula alleghaniensis
    States
    ME
    Go to project
    Project Contents

    Data for 37 Plots, 1757 Trees, 1757 Cores

    Principal Investigator

    Shawn Fraver and Alan White

    Laboratory

    UMaine Orono

    Project Description

    We used tree-ring data from 37 plots, randomly located within the TNC’s Big Reed Forest Reserve, to reconstruct the history of natural disturbances in this old-growth landscape.

  • Thumbnail for Project

    Climate response of co-occurring tree species using tree-rings


    Completeness
    Completeness: 81%
    Chronology spans
    1670 to 2016
    Species
    Quercus rubra
    Quercus alba
    Quercus macrocarpa
    Carya ovata
    Fagus grandifolia
    Liriodendron tulipifera
    Acer saccharum
    Fraxinus nigra
    Juglans nigra
    Quercus montana
    Quercus palustris
    States
    IN
    Go to project
    Project Contents

    Data for 10 Plots, 371 Trees, 669 Cores

    Principal Investigator

    Justin T. Maxwell, Grant L. Harley, Scott M. Robeson.

    Laboratory

    Unknown

    Project Description

    In this project we were interested in comparing the climate response between multiple co-occurring species. While, we found that the general response was to June climate and that soil moisture was the leading driver of growth, we found distinct species-specific differences. The ongoing work aims at determining what drives these differences.

  • Thumbnail for Project

    Growth trends and environmental drivers of major tree species of the Northern Hardwood Forest


    Completeness
    Completeness: 100%
    Chronology spans
    1740 to 2016
    Species
    Acer rubrum
    Betula alleghaniensis
    Fagus grandifolia
    Acer saccharum
    States
    VT
    Go to project
    Project Contents

    Data for 30 Plots, 688 Trees, 4095 Cores

    Principal Investigator

    Rebecca Stern, Paul Schaberg, Shelly Rayback, Paula Murakami, Christopher Hansen, Gary Hawley

    Laboratory

    Schaberg/Hawley/Rayback Dendrochronology Collaborative

    Project Description

    We measured tree rings for 688 dominant and codominant sugar maple, red maple, yellow birch and American beech trees at 30 VT sites, and statistically compared growth to tree and stand characteristics and regional climate and pollutant deposition data.

  • Thumbnail for Project

    SCBI Forest-GEO Complete Chronologies


    Completeness
    Completeness: 99%
    Chronology spans
    1777 to 2017
    Species
    Carya cordiformis
    Carya glabra
    Carya ovalis
    Carya tomentosa
    Fagus grandifolia
    Fraxinus americana
    Fraxinus nigra
    Juglans nigra
    Liliodendron tulipifera
    Pinus strobus
    Quercus alba
    Quercus montana
    Quercus rubra
    Quercus velutina
    States
    VA
    Go to project
    Project Contents

    Data for 1 Plot, 726 Trees, 726 Cores

    Principal Investigator

    Kristina Anderson-Teixeira

    Laboratory

    Unknown

    Project Description

    The Smithsonian Conservation Biology Institute (SCBI) large forest dynamics plot is located at the Smithsonian’s National Zoo and Conservation Biology Institute in Front Royal, VA, adjacent to the northern end of Shenandoah National Park. The plot is located at the intersection of three of the major physiographic provinces of the eastern US: the Blue Ridge, Ridge and Valley, and Piedmont provinces. The forest type is typical mature secondary eastern mixed deciduous forest, with a canopy dominated by tulip poplar (Liriodendron tulipifera), oaks (Quercus spp.), and hickories (Carya spp.), and an understory composed mainly of spicebush (Lindera benzoin), paw-paw (Asimina triloba), American hornbeam (Carpinus caroliniana), and witch hazel (Hamamelis virginiana). The SCBI forest plot is 25.6 ha (640 x 400 m), including a 4-ha fenced exclosure where white-tailed deer have been excluded since 1990, as well as three 1-ha Smithsonian Monitoring and Assessment of Biodiversity Program (SI-MAB) sites, with some sites surveyed several times since 1990. In 2010 and 2011, over 500 trees were cored in order to establish a baseline of dendrochronological data and gather background on the forest plot. In 2016 the annual mortality census was amended to include coring any tree marked dead. This practice was continued in 2017 when the current chronologies were created.


  • Back to Top

    Fraxinus americana

  • Thumbnail for Project

    SCBI Forest-GEO Complete Chronologies


    Completeness
    Completeness: 99%
    Chronology spans
    1777 to 2017
    Species
    Carya cordiformis
    Carya glabra
    Carya ovalis
    Carya tomentosa
    Fagus grandifolia
    Fraxinus americana
    Fraxinus nigra
    Juglans nigra
    Liliodendron tulipifera
    Pinus strobus
    Quercus alba
    Quercus montana
    Quercus rubra
    Quercus velutina
    States
    VA
    Go to project
    Project Contents

    Data for 1 Plot, 726 Trees, 726 Cores

    Principal Investigator

    Kristina Anderson-Teixeira

    Laboratory

    Unknown

    Project Description

    The Smithsonian Conservation Biology Institute (SCBI) large forest dynamics plot is located at the Smithsonian’s National Zoo and Conservation Biology Institute in Front Royal, VA, adjacent to the northern end of Shenandoah National Park. The plot is located at the intersection of three of the major physiographic provinces of the eastern US: the Blue Ridge, Ridge and Valley, and Piedmont provinces. The forest type is typical mature secondary eastern mixed deciduous forest, with a canopy dominated by tulip poplar (Liriodendron tulipifera), oaks (Quercus spp.), and hickories (Carya spp.), and an understory composed mainly of spicebush (Lindera benzoin), paw-paw (Asimina triloba), American hornbeam (Carpinus caroliniana), and witch hazel (Hamamelis virginiana). The SCBI forest plot is 25.6 ha (640 x 400 m), including a 4-ha fenced exclosure where white-tailed deer have been excluded since 1990, as well as three 1-ha Smithsonian Monitoring and Assessment of Biodiversity Program (SI-MAB) sites, with some sites surveyed several times since 1990. In 2010 and 2011, over 500 trees were cored in order to establish a baseline of dendrochronological data and gather background on the forest plot. In 2016 the annual mortality census was amended to include coring any tree marked dead. This practice was continued in 2017 when the current chronologies were created.


  • Back to Top

    Fraxinus nigra

  • Thumbnail for Project

    Climate response of co-occurring tree species using tree-rings


    Completeness
    Completeness: 81%
    Chronology spans
    1670 to 2016
    Species
    Quercus rubra
    Quercus alba
    Quercus macrocarpa
    Carya ovata
    Fagus grandifolia
    Liriodendron tulipifera
    Acer saccharum
    Fraxinus nigra
    Juglans nigra
    Quercus montana
    Quercus palustris
    States
    IN
    Go to project
    Project Contents

    Data for 10 Plots, 371 Trees, 669 Cores

    Principal Investigator

    Justin T. Maxwell, Grant L. Harley, Scott M. Robeson.

    Laboratory

    Unknown

    Project Description

    In this project we were interested in comparing the climate response between multiple co-occurring species. While, we found that the general response was to June climate and that soil moisture was the leading driver of growth, we found distinct species-specific differences. The ongoing work aims at determining what drives these differences.

  • Thumbnail for Project

    SCBI Forest-GEO Complete Chronologies


    Completeness
    Completeness: 99%
    Chronology spans
    1777 to 2017
    Species
    Carya cordiformis
    Carya glabra
    Carya ovalis
    Carya tomentosa
    Fagus grandifolia
    Fraxinus americana
    Fraxinus nigra
    Juglans nigra
    Liliodendron tulipifera
    Pinus strobus
    Quercus alba
    Quercus montana
    Quercus rubra
    Quercus velutina
    States
    VA
    Go to project
    Project Contents

    Data for 1 Plot, 726 Trees, 726 Cores

    Principal Investigator

    Kristina Anderson-Teixeira

    Laboratory

    Unknown

    Project Description

    The Smithsonian Conservation Biology Institute (SCBI) large forest dynamics plot is located at the Smithsonian’s National Zoo and Conservation Biology Institute in Front Royal, VA, adjacent to the northern end of Shenandoah National Park. The plot is located at the intersection of three of the major physiographic provinces of the eastern US: the Blue Ridge, Ridge and Valley, and Piedmont provinces. The forest type is typical mature secondary eastern mixed deciduous forest, with a canopy dominated by tulip poplar (Liriodendron tulipifera), oaks (Quercus spp.), and hickories (Carya spp.), and an understory composed mainly of spicebush (Lindera benzoin), paw-paw (Asimina triloba), American hornbeam (Carpinus caroliniana), and witch hazel (Hamamelis virginiana). The SCBI forest plot is 25.6 ha (640 x 400 m), including a 4-ha fenced exclosure where white-tailed deer have been excluded since 1990, as well as three 1-ha Smithsonian Monitoring and Assessment of Biodiversity Program (SI-MAB) sites, with some sites surveyed several times since 1990. In 2010 and 2011, over 500 trees were cored in order to establish a baseline of dendrochronological data and gather background on the forest plot. In 2016 the annual mortality census was amended to include coring any tree marked dead. This practice was continued in 2017 when the current chronologies were created.


  • Back to Top

    Juglans nigra

  • Thumbnail for Project

    Climate response of co-occurring tree species using tree-rings


    Completeness
    Completeness: 81%
    Chronology spans
    1670 to 2016
    Species
    Quercus rubra
    Quercus alba
    Quercus macrocarpa
    Carya ovata
    Fagus grandifolia
    Liriodendron tulipifera
    Acer saccharum
    Fraxinus nigra
    Juglans nigra
    Quercus montana
    Quercus palustris
    States
    IN
    Go to project
    Project Contents

    Data for 10 Plots, 371 Trees, 669 Cores

    Principal Investigator

    Justin T. Maxwell, Grant L. Harley, Scott M. Robeson.

    Laboratory

    Unknown

    Project Description

    In this project we were interested in comparing the climate response between multiple co-occurring species. While, we found that the general response was to June climate and that soil moisture was the leading driver of growth, we found distinct species-specific differences. The ongoing work aims at determining what drives these differences.

  • Thumbnail for Project

    SCBI Forest-GEO Complete Chronologies


    Completeness
    Completeness: 99%
    Chronology spans
    1777 to 2017
    Species
    Carya cordiformis
    Carya glabra
    Carya ovalis
    Carya tomentosa
    Fagus grandifolia
    Fraxinus americana
    Fraxinus nigra
    Juglans nigra
    Liliodendron tulipifera
    Pinus strobus
    Quercus alba
    Quercus montana
    Quercus rubra
    Quercus velutina
    States
    VA
    Go to project
    Project Contents

    Data for 1 Plot, 726 Trees, 726 Cores

    Principal Investigator

    Kristina Anderson-Teixeira

    Laboratory

    Unknown

    Project Description

    The Smithsonian Conservation Biology Institute (SCBI) large forest dynamics plot is located at the Smithsonian’s National Zoo and Conservation Biology Institute in Front Royal, VA, adjacent to the northern end of Shenandoah National Park. The plot is located at the intersection of three of the major physiographic provinces of the eastern US: the Blue Ridge, Ridge and Valley, and Piedmont provinces. The forest type is typical mature secondary eastern mixed deciduous forest, with a canopy dominated by tulip poplar (Liriodendron tulipifera), oaks (Quercus spp.), and hickories (Carya spp.), and an understory composed mainly of spicebush (Lindera benzoin), paw-paw (Asimina triloba), American hornbeam (Carpinus caroliniana), and witch hazel (Hamamelis virginiana). The SCBI forest plot is 25.6 ha (640 x 400 m), including a 4-ha fenced exclosure where white-tailed deer have been excluded since 1990, as well as three 1-ha Smithsonian Monitoring and Assessment of Biodiversity Program (SI-MAB) sites, with some sites surveyed several times since 1990. In 2010 and 2011, over 500 trees were cored in order to establish a baseline of dendrochronological data and gather background on the forest plot. In 2016 the annual mortality census was amended to include coring any tree marked dead. This practice was continued in 2017 when the current chronologies were created.


  • Back to Top

    Liliodendron tulipifera

  • Thumbnail for Project

    SCBI Forest-GEO Complete Chronologies


    Completeness
    Completeness: 99%
    Chronology spans
    1777 to 2017
    Species
    Carya cordiformis
    Carya glabra
    Carya ovalis
    Carya tomentosa
    Fagus grandifolia
    Fraxinus americana
    Fraxinus nigra
    Juglans nigra
    Liliodendron tulipifera
    Pinus strobus
    Quercus alba
    Quercus montana
    Quercus rubra
    Quercus velutina
    States
    VA
    Go to project
    Project Contents

    Data for 1 Plot, 726 Trees, 726 Cores

    Principal Investigator

    Kristina Anderson-Teixeira

    Laboratory

    Unknown

    Project Description

    The Smithsonian Conservation Biology Institute (SCBI) large forest dynamics plot is located at the Smithsonian’s National Zoo and Conservation Biology Institute in Front Royal, VA, adjacent to the northern end of Shenandoah National Park. The plot is located at the intersection of three of the major physiographic provinces of the eastern US: the Blue Ridge, Ridge and Valley, and Piedmont provinces. The forest type is typical mature secondary eastern mixed deciduous forest, with a canopy dominated by tulip poplar (Liriodendron tulipifera), oaks (Quercus spp.), and hickories (Carya spp.), and an understory composed mainly of spicebush (Lindera benzoin), paw-paw (Asimina triloba), American hornbeam (Carpinus caroliniana), and witch hazel (Hamamelis virginiana). The SCBI forest plot is 25.6 ha (640 x 400 m), including a 4-ha fenced exclosure where white-tailed deer have been excluded since 1990, as well as three 1-ha Smithsonian Monitoring and Assessment of Biodiversity Program (SI-MAB) sites, with some sites surveyed several times since 1990. In 2010 and 2011, over 500 trees were cored in order to establish a baseline of dendrochronological data and gather background on the forest plot. In 2016 the annual mortality census was amended to include coring any tree marked dead. This practice was continued in 2017 when the current chronologies were created.


  • Back to Top

    Liriodendron tulipifera

  • Thumbnail for Project

    Climate response of co-occurring tree species using tree-rings


    Completeness
    Completeness: 81%
    Chronology spans
    1670 to 2016
    Species
    Quercus rubra
    Quercus alba
    Quercus macrocarpa
    Carya ovata
    Fagus grandifolia
    Liriodendron tulipifera
    Acer saccharum
    Fraxinus nigra
    Juglans nigra
    Quercus montana
    Quercus palustris
    States
    IN
    Go to project
    Project Contents

    Data for 10 Plots, 371 Trees, 669 Cores

    Principal Investigator

    Justin T. Maxwell, Grant L. Harley, Scott M. Robeson.

    Laboratory

    Unknown

    Project Description

    In this project we were interested in comparing the climate response between multiple co-occurring species. While, we found that the general response was to June climate and that soil moisture was the leading driver of growth, we found distinct species-specific differences. The ongoing work aims at determining what drives these differences.


  • Back to Top

    Picea rubens

  • Thumbnail for Project

    Comparative growth trends of five Northern hardwood and montane tree species along elevational transects in Mt. Mansfield State Forest


    Completeness
    Completeness: 100%
    Chronology spans
    1737 to 2012
    Species
    Abies balsamea
    Picea rubens
    Acer rubrum
    Acer saccharum
    Betula alleghaniensis
    States
    VT
    Go to project
    Project Contents

    Data for 9 Plots, 268 Trees, 479 Cores

    Principal Investigator

    Alexandra Kosiba, Paul Schaberg, Gary Hawley, Shelly Rayback

    Primary Contact

    Alexandra Kosiba

    Laboratory

    Schaberg/Hawley/Rayback Dendrochronology Collaborative

    Project Description

    We set up elevational transects were set up in three of the four watersheds on Mt. Mansfield (Underhill, VT): Brown’s River, Stevensville Brook, and Ranch Brook Watersheds. Along each of these transects, three plots were selected – one within each of the following elevational zones: low (450-650 m asl), mid (750-850 m) and high (900-1000 m) (n plots = 9), which align with northern hardwoods, transition, and montane spruce-fir ecotones. Plots contained 10-14 dominant or co-dominant trees of each of the target tree species with approximately equal distribution around plot center in attempts to avoid differing competition pressures between trees. We sampled red maple, sugar maple, and red spruce at low elevation; sugar maple, yellow birch, and red spruce at mid elevation; and red spruce and balsam fir at high elevation. Due to differential species densities across the landscape, plots were of variable radius.

  • Thumbnail for Project

    Quantifying the legacy of foliar winter injury on woody aboveground carbon sequestration of red spruce trees


    Completeness
    Completeness: 100%
    Chronology spans
    1713 to 2010
    Species
    Picea rubens
    States
    VT, MA, NH
    Go to project
    Project Contents

    Data for 39 Plots, 380 Trees, 756 Cores

    Principal Investigator

    Alexandra Kosiba, Paul Schaberg, Gary Hawley

    Laboratory

    Schaberg/Hawley Lab

    Project Description

    In 2003, a severe region-wide event damaged over 90% of red spruce in the northeastern US. We assessed the influence of the 2003 winter injury event on long-term growth and C sequestration of red spruce trees by measuring the xylem growth (basal area increment) in forest stands in Vermont, New Hampshire, and Massachusetts where winter injury was quantified in 2003. To do this, we assessed dominant and co-dominant red spruce trees in 30 forest plots (10–15 trees per plot) from 14 locations that had been quantified for winter injury severity (visual assessment of damage to current-year foliage, ranging from 0% to 100%) in 2003 (a sub-set of the 27 locations and 176 plots assessed by Lazarus et al., 2004).

  • Thumbnail for Project

    Forest condition change in northern Vermont: potential causes and implications for landscape-scale analysis


    Completeness
    Completeness: 78%
    Chronology spans
    1864 to 2010
    Species
    Abies balsamea
    Betula papyrifera
    Picea rubens
    Betula alleghaniensis
    Fagus grandifolia
    Pinus strobus
    Pinus resinosa
    Acer saccharum
    Acer rubrum
    States
    VT, NH
    Go to project
    Project Contents

    Data for 16 Plots, 253 Trees, 492 Cores

    Principal Investigator

    Aiko Weverka, Jen Pontius

    Laboratory

    Pointus and Schaberg/Hawley Labs

    Project Description

    In this study, the following questions were investigated: 1) Is there a relationship between measurements of basal area increment and vegetation indices derived from Landsat 5 TM data the same year 1984-2010? 2) If these relationships exist, are they stronger for certain vegetation indices, species types, or particular locations? 3) Is there some combination of multiple vegetation indices that can be used to model BAI across the landscape? To answer these questions, we analyzed tree growth for dominant species in Northern Vermont and New Hampshire.

  • Thumbnail for Project

    Red spruce growth comparison: calcium addition and reference watersheds at Hubbard Brook Experimental Forest, NH


    Completeness
    Completeness: 82%
    Chronology spans
    1888 to 2005
    Species
    Picea rubens
    States
    NH
    Go to project
    Project Contents

    Data for 6 Plots, 60 Trees, 120 Cores

    Principal Investigator

    Joshua Halman, Paul Schaberg, and Gary Hawley

    Laboratory

    Schaberg/Hawley Lab

    Project Description

    In 2006, we examined the annual growth of dominant and codominant red spruce trees growing in the reference watershed (WS6) and calcium-addition watershed (WS1) at Hubbard Brook Experimental Forest (Thorton, NH) to compare the effects of Ca-addition on red spruce growth dynamics.

  • Thumbnail for Project

    Balsam fir and red spruce growth trends along elevation on Whiteface Mountain, NY


    Completeness
    Completeness: 100%
    Chronology spans
    1769 to 2011
    Species
    Abies balsamea
    Picea rubens
    States
    NY
    Go to project
    Project Contents

    Data for 31 Plots, 114 Trees, 219 Cores

    Principal Investigator

    Martin Dovciak, Colin Beier, and Jay Wason

    Laboratory

    Dovciak Lab

    Project Description

    This research involved resampling a series of permanent plots established in the 1980's and collecting tree cores from red spruce and balsam fir at many of these sites to identify shifts in tree growth and demography associated with recent environmental changes. To do this, we studied tree species distributions along elevational gradients on 12 mountains in four states of the northeastern United States (New York, Vermont, New Hampshire, and Maine). See Wason et al. (2017) for more information.

  • Thumbnail for Project

    Assessing relationships between red spruce radial growth and pollution critical load exceedance values


    Completeness
    Completeness: 88%
    Chronology spans
    1825 to 2012
    Species
    Picea rubens
    States
    VT, NH
    Go to project
    Project Contents

    Data for 12 Plots, 137 Trees, 256 Cores

    Principal Investigator

    Ben Engel, Paul Schberg, Gary Hawley, Shelly Rayback

    Laboratory

    Schaberg/Hawley/Rayback Dendrochronology Collaborative

    Project Description

    In order to maximize the sample size and range of exceedance values assessed, this study utilized a large set of both pre-existing (Weverka, 2012, Kosiba et al., 2013, Kosiba et al., 2014) and newly collected red spruce xylem increment cores from VT and NH, for a total of 441 trees at 37 sites. These sites included 23 plots chosen to reflect a broad range of red spruce forest conditions (Weverka, 2012, Kosiba et al., 2013, Kosiba et al., 2014) and 14 new plots that were selected using a previously established critical load and exceedence model (NEG/ECP) to identify areas where: (1) red spruce were predicted to occur in the forest type module of the NEG/ECP model, (2) located on state and federal lands to streamline the issuance of collection permits, and (3) at locations where modeled exceedance values approach the positive and negative limits for the study area (−2 and +2 keq ha−1 y−1) to extend and balance the range of values assessed.

  • Thumbnail for Project

    Effects of multiaged silvicultural systems on reserve tree growth 19 years after establishment across multiple species in the Acadian forest in Maine


    Completeness
    Completeness: 76%
    Chronology spans
    1850 to 2013
    Species
    Pinus strobus
    Picea rubens
    Tsuga canadensis
    Acer rubrum
    Thuja occidentalis
    States
    ME
    Go to project
    Project Contents

    Data for 104 Plots, 718 Trees, 715 Cores

    Principal Investigator

    David R. Carter, Robert S. Seymour, Shawn Fraver, and Aaron Weitskittel

    Laboratory

    UMaine Orono

    Project Description

    This study investigated the growth response of mature, isolated reserve trees (n = 528) and their paired analogues from the control (n=190) in two multiaged silvicultural systems in the Acadian Forest Ecosystem Research Project (AFERP).

  • Thumbnail for Project

    Assessment of weather-associated causes of red spruce winter injury and consequences to aboveground carbon sequestration


    Completeness
    Completeness: 88%
    Chronology spans
    1743 to 2005
    Species
    Picea rubens
    States
    VT, NH, MA, NY
    Go to project
    Project Contents

    Data for 24 Plots, 241 Trees, 483 Cores

    Principal Investigator

    Paul Schaberg, Gary Hawley, and Brynne Lazarus

    Laboratory

    Schaberg/Hawley Lab

    Project Description

    We sought to investigate the environmental factors that may contribute to red spruce foliar winter injury and how much this injury influences tree carbon stores. We used a long-term record of winter injury in a plantation in New Hampshire and at 23 forested plots (in MA, NH, and VT) and conducted stepwise linear regression analyses with local weather and regional pollution data to determine which parameters helped account for observed injury.

  • Thumbnail for Project

    Natural disturbance in an old-growth landscape of northern Maine


    Completeness
    Completeness: 88%
    Chronology spans
    1651 to 2001
    Species
    Fagus grandifolia
    Picea rubens
    Acer saccharum
    Abies balsamea
    Thuja occidentalis
    Betula alleghaniensis
    States
    ME
    Go to project
    Project Contents

    Data for 37 Plots, 1757 Trees, 1757 Cores

    Principal Investigator

    Shawn Fraver and Alan White

    Laboratory

    UMaine Orono

    Project Description

    We used tree-ring data from 37 plots, randomly located within the TNC’s Big Reed Forest Reserve, to reconstruct the history of natural disturbances in this old-growth landscape.

  • Thumbnail for Project

    Drivers of red spruce and balsam fir tree growth in mountains of the Northeastern US


    Completeness
    Completeness: 100%
    Chronology spans
    1900 to 2012
    Species
    Abies balsamea
    Picea rubens
    States
    NY, VT, NH, ME
    Go to project
    Project Contents

    Data for 40 Plots, 246 Trees, 246 Cores

    Principal Investigator

    Jay W. Wason, Colin M. Beier, John J. Battles, Martin Dovciak

    Laboratory

    SUNY ESF

    Project Description

    This project integrates with our broader research on montane spruce-fir forest responses to environmental change. In this project, we collected tree cores from red spruce and balsam fir trees along elevation gradients on 10 mountains across the northeastern US. We analyzed the tree rings to determine the extent to which climate and acidic deposition have driven recent tree growth patterns.

  • Thumbnail for Project

    NGCP Red Spruce Biogeochemistry


    Completeness
    Completeness: 99%
    Chronology spans
    1677 to 1993
    Species
    Picea rubens
    States
    NY, VT, NH, ME
    Go to project
    Project Contents

    Data for 8 Plots, 273 Trees, 508 Cores

    Principal Investigator

    Kevin T. Smith (NRS), Walter C. Shortle (NRS, retired), Gregory B. Lawrence (USGS)

    Laboratory

    Unknown

    Project Description

    At the invitation of the Northern Global Change Program, coordinated sampling and analysis was conducted for soil chemistry, dendrochronology, and dendrochemistry.


  • Back to Top

    Pinus resinosa

  • Thumbnail for Project

    Forest condition change in northern Vermont: potential causes and implications for landscape-scale analysis


    Completeness
    Completeness: 78%
    Chronology spans
    1864 to 2010
    Species
    Abies balsamea
    Betula papyrifera
    Picea rubens
    Betula alleghaniensis
    Fagus grandifolia
    Pinus strobus
    Pinus resinosa
    Acer saccharum
    Acer rubrum
    States
    VT, NH
    Go to project
    Project Contents

    Data for 16 Plots, 253 Trees, 492 Cores

    Principal Investigator

    Aiko Weverka, Jen Pontius

    Laboratory

    Pointus and Schaberg/Hawley Labs

    Project Description

    In this study, the following questions were investigated: 1) Is there a relationship between measurements of basal area increment and vegetation indices derived from Landsat 5 TM data the same year 1984-2010? 2) If these relationships exist, are they stronger for certain vegetation indices, species types, or particular locations? 3) Is there some combination of multiple vegetation indices that can be used to model BAI across the landscape? To answer these questions, we analyzed tree growth for dominant species in Northern Vermont and New Hampshire.


  • Back to Top

    Pinus strobus

  • Thumbnail for Project

    Forest condition change in northern Vermont: potential causes and implications for landscape-scale analysis


    Completeness
    Completeness: 78%
    Chronology spans
    1864 to 2010
    Species
    Abies balsamea
    Betula papyrifera
    Picea rubens
    Betula alleghaniensis
    Fagus grandifolia
    Pinus strobus
    Pinus resinosa
    Acer saccharum
    Acer rubrum
    States
    VT, NH
    Go to project
    Project Contents

    Data for 16 Plots, 253 Trees, 492 Cores

    Principal Investigator

    Aiko Weverka, Jen Pontius

    Laboratory

    Pointus and Schaberg/Hawley Labs

    Project Description

    In this study, the following questions were investigated: 1) Is there a relationship between measurements of basal area increment and vegetation indices derived from Landsat 5 TM data the same year 1984-2010? 2) If these relationships exist, are they stronger for certain vegetation indices, species types, or particular locations? 3) Is there some combination of multiple vegetation indices that can be used to model BAI across the landscape? To answer these questions, we analyzed tree growth for dominant species in Northern Vermont and New Hampshire.

  • Thumbnail for Project

    Effects of multiaged silvicultural systems on reserve tree growth 19 years after establishment across multiple species in the Acadian forest in Maine


    Completeness
    Completeness: 76%
    Chronology spans
    1850 to 2013
    Species
    Pinus strobus
    Picea rubens
    Tsuga canadensis
    Acer rubrum
    Thuja occidentalis
    States
    ME
    Go to project
    Project Contents

    Data for 104 Plots, 718 Trees, 715 Cores

    Principal Investigator

    David R. Carter, Robert S. Seymour, Shawn Fraver, and Aaron Weitskittel

    Laboratory

    UMaine Orono

    Project Description

    This study investigated the growth response of mature, isolated reserve trees (n = 528) and their paired analogues from the control (n=190) in two multiaged silvicultural systems in the Acadian Forest Ecosystem Research Project (AFERP).

  • Thumbnail for Project

    Eastern white pine and eastern hemlock growth: possible tradeoffs in response of canopy trees to climate and pollution


    Completeness
    Completeness: 100%
    Chronology spans
    1735 to 2016
    Species
    Tsuga canadensis
    Pinus strobus
    States
    VT
    Go to project
    Project Contents

    Data for 26 Plots, 507 Trees, 1996 Cores

    Principal Investigator

    Rebecca Stern, Paul Schaberg, Shelly Rayback, Paula Murakami, Christopher Hansen, Gary Hawley

    Laboratory

    Schaberg/Hawley/Rayback Dendrochronology Collaborative

    Project Description

    We measured tree rings for 507 dominant and codominant eastern white pine and eastern hemlock trees at 24 VT sites, and statistically compared growth to tree and stand characteristics and regional climate and pollutant deposition data.

  • Thumbnail for Project

    SCBI Forest-GEO Complete Chronologies


    Completeness
    Completeness: 99%
    Chronology spans
    1777 to 2017
    Species
    Carya cordiformis
    Carya glabra
    Carya ovalis
    Carya tomentosa
    Fagus grandifolia
    Fraxinus americana
    Fraxinus nigra
    Juglans nigra
    Liliodendron tulipifera
    Pinus strobus
    Quercus alba
    Quercus montana
    Quercus rubra
    Quercus velutina
    States
    VA
    Go to project
    Project Contents

    Data for 1 Plot, 726 Trees, 726 Cores

    Principal Investigator

    Kristina Anderson-Teixeira

    Laboratory

    Unknown

    Project Description

    The Smithsonian Conservation Biology Institute (SCBI) large forest dynamics plot is located at the Smithsonian’s National Zoo and Conservation Biology Institute in Front Royal, VA, adjacent to the northern end of Shenandoah National Park. The plot is located at the intersection of three of the major physiographic provinces of the eastern US: the Blue Ridge, Ridge and Valley, and Piedmont provinces. The forest type is typical mature secondary eastern mixed deciduous forest, with a canopy dominated by tulip poplar (Liriodendron tulipifera), oaks (Quercus spp.), and hickories (Carya spp.), and an understory composed mainly of spicebush (Lindera benzoin), paw-paw (Asimina triloba), American hornbeam (Carpinus caroliniana), and witch hazel (Hamamelis virginiana). The SCBI forest plot is 25.6 ha (640 x 400 m), including a 4-ha fenced exclosure where white-tailed deer have been excluded since 1990, as well as three 1-ha Smithsonian Monitoring and Assessment of Biodiversity Program (SI-MAB) sites, with some sites surveyed several times since 1990. In 2010 and 2011, over 500 trees were cored in order to establish a baseline of dendrochronological data and gather background on the forest plot. In 2016 the annual mortality census was amended to include coring any tree marked dead. This practice was continued in 2017 when the current chronologies were created.


  • Back to Top

    Quercus alba

  • Thumbnail for Project

    Climate response of co-occurring tree species using tree-rings


    Completeness
    Completeness: 81%
    Chronology spans
    1670 to 2016
    Species
    Quercus rubra
    Quercus alba
    Quercus macrocarpa
    Carya ovata
    Fagus grandifolia
    Liriodendron tulipifera
    Acer saccharum
    Fraxinus nigra
    Juglans nigra
    Quercus montana
    Quercus palustris
    States
    IN
    Go to project
    Project Contents

    Data for 10 Plots, 371 Trees, 669 Cores

    Principal Investigator

    Justin T. Maxwell, Grant L. Harley, Scott M. Robeson.

    Laboratory

    Unknown

    Project Description

    In this project we were interested in comparing the climate response between multiple co-occurring species. While, we found that the general response was to June climate and that soil moisture was the leading driver of growth, we found distinct species-specific differences. The ongoing work aims at determining what drives these differences.

  • Thumbnail for Project

    White oak chronologies of the Champlain Valley of Vermont


    Completeness
    Completeness: 99%
    Chronology spans
    1630 to 2016
    Species
    Quercus alba
    States
    VT
    Go to project
    Project Contents

    Data for 4 Plots, 53 Trees, 108 Cores

    Principal Investigator

    Schaberg, P.G., Murakami, P.F., Hansen, C.F., D’Amato, A.W., and Murray, H.F.

    Laboratory

    Unknown

    Project Description

    This is a collection of white oak cores collected in the Champlain Valley of Vermont. Two trees in this collection can be dated back to 1662 and 1630 with one individual probably originating before the year 1580.

  • Thumbnail for Project

    White oak and red maple tree cores from urban forest patches and reference sites


    Completeness
    Completeness: 97%
    Chronology spans
    1729 to 2015
    Species
    Quercus alba
    Acer rubrum
    States
    NY, MD, PA
    Go to project
    Project Contents

    Data for 18 Plots, 170 Trees, 336 Cores

    Principal Investigator

    Nancy F. Sonti, Richard A. Hallett, Kevin L. Griffin, and Joe H. Sullivan

    Laboratory

    Unknown

    Project Description

    Tree cores were collected to compare growth rates of two important native tree species (white oak (Quercus alba L.) and red maple (Acer rubrum L.)) across urban and reference forest sites of three major cities in the eastern United States (New York, NY (NYC); Philadelphia, PA; and Baltimore, MD). Trees were selected from secondary growth oak-hickory forests found in New York, NY; Philadelphia, PA; and Baltimore, MD, as well as at reference forest sites outside each metropolitan area.

  • Thumbnail for Project

    SCBI Forest-GEO Complete Chronologies


    Completeness
    Completeness: 99%
    Chronology spans
    1777 to 2017
    Species
    Carya cordiformis
    Carya glabra
    Carya ovalis
    Carya tomentosa
    Fagus grandifolia
    Fraxinus americana
    Fraxinus nigra
    Juglans nigra
    Liliodendron tulipifera
    Pinus strobus
    Quercus alba
    Quercus montana
    Quercus rubra
    Quercus velutina
    States
    VA
    Go to project
    Project Contents

    Data for 1 Plot, 726 Trees, 726 Cores

    Principal Investigator

    Kristina Anderson-Teixeira

    Laboratory

    Unknown

    Project Description

    The Smithsonian Conservation Biology Institute (SCBI) large forest dynamics plot is located at the Smithsonian’s National Zoo and Conservation Biology Institute in Front Royal, VA, adjacent to the northern end of Shenandoah National Park. The plot is located at the intersection of three of the major physiographic provinces of the eastern US: the Blue Ridge, Ridge and Valley, and Piedmont provinces. The forest type is typical mature secondary eastern mixed deciduous forest, with a canopy dominated by tulip poplar (Liriodendron tulipifera), oaks (Quercus spp.), and hickories (Carya spp.), and an understory composed mainly of spicebush (Lindera benzoin), paw-paw (Asimina triloba), American hornbeam (Carpinus caroliniana), and witch hazel (Hamamelis virginiana). The SCBI forest plot is 25.6 ha (640 x 400 m), including a 4-ha fenced exclosure where white-tailed deer have been excluded since 1990, as well as three 1-ha Smithsonian Monitoring and Assessment of Biodiversity Program (SI-MAB) sites, with some sites surveyed several times since 1990. In 2010 and 2011, over 500 trees were cored in order to establish a baseline of dendrochronological data and gather background on the forest plot. In 2016 the annual mortality census was amended to include coring any tree marked dead. This practice was continued in 2017 when the current chronologies were created.


  • Back to Top

    Quercus macrocarpa

  • Thumbnail for Project

    Climate response of co-occurring tree species using tree-rings


    Completeness
    Completeness: 81%
    Chronology spans
    1670 to 2016
    Species
    Quercus rubra
    Quercus alba
    Quercus macrocarpa
    Carya ovata
    Fagus grandifolia
    Liriodendron tulipifera
    Acer saccharum
    Fraxinus nigra
    Juglans nigra
    Quercus montana
    Quercus palustris
    States
    IN
    Go to project
    Project Contents

    Data for 10 Plots, 371 Trees, 669 Cores

    Principal Investigator

    Justin T. Maxwell, Grant L. Harley, Scott M. Robeson.

    Laboratory

    Unknown

    Project Description

    In this project we were interested in comparing the climate response between multiple co-occurring species. While, we found that the general response was to June climate and that soil moisture was the leading driver of growth, we found distinct species-specific differences. The ongoing work aims at determining what drives these differences.


  • Back to Top

    Quercus montana

  • Thumbnail for Project

    Climate response of co-occurring tree species using tree-rings


    Completeness
    Completeness: 81%
    Chronology spans
    1670 to 2016
    Species
    Quercus rubra
    Quercus alba
    Quercus macrocarpa
    Carya ovata
    Fagus grandifolia
    Liriodendron tulipifera
    Acer saccharum
    Fraxinus nigra
    Juglans nigra
    Quercus montana
    Quercus palustris
    States
    IN
    Go to project
    Project Contents

    Data for 10 Plots, 371 Trees, 669 Cores

    Principal Investigator

    Justin T. Maxwell, Grant L. Harley, Scott M. Robeson.

    Laboratory

    Unknown

    Project Description

    In this project we were interested in comparing the climate response between multiple co-occurring species. While, we found that the general response was to June climate and that soil moisture was the leading driver of growth, we found distinct species-specific differences. The ongoing work aims at determining what drives these differences.

  • Thumbnail for Project

    SCBI Forest-GEO Complete Chronologies


    Completeness
    Completeness: 99%
    Chronology spans
    1777 to 2017
    Species
    Carya cordiformis
    Carya glabra
    Carya ovalis
    Carya tomentosa
    Fagus grandifolia
    Fraxinus americana
    Fraxinus nigra
    Juglans nigra
    Liliodendron tulipifera
    Pinus strobus
    Quercus alba
    Quercus montana
    Quercus rubra
    Quercus velutina
    States
    VA
    Go to project
    Project Contents

    Data for 1 Plot, 726 Trees, 726 Cores

    Principal Investigator

    Kristina Anderson-Teixeira

    Laboratory

    Unknown

    Project Description

    The Smithsonian Conservation Biology Institute (SCBI) large forest dynamics plot is located at the Smithsonian’s National Zoo and Conservation Biology Institute in Front Royal, VA, adjacent to the northern end of Shenandoah National Park. The plot is located at the intersection of three of the major physiographic provinces of the eastern US: the Blue Ridge, Ridge and Valley, and Piedmont provinces. The forest type is typical mature secondary eastern mixed deciduous forest, with a canopy dominated by tulip poplar (Liriodendron tulipifera), oaks (Quercus spp.), and hickories (Carya spp.), and an understory composed mainly of spicebush (Lindera benzoin), paw-paw (Asimina triloba), American hornbeam (Carpinus caroliniana), and witch hazel (Hamamelis virginiana). The SCBI forest plot is 25.6 ha (640 x 400 m), including a 4-ha fenced exclosure where white-tailed deer have been excluded since 1990, as well as three 1-ha Smithsonian Monitoring and Assessment of Biodiversity Program (SI-MAB) sites, with some sites surveyed several times since 1990. In 2010 and 2011, over 500 trees were cored in order to establish a baseline of dendrochronological data and gather background on the forest plot. In 2016 the annual mortality census was amended to include coring any tree marked dead. This practice was continued in 2017 when the current chronologies were created.


  • Back to Top

    Quercus palustris

  • Thumbnail for Project

    Climate response of co-occurring tree species using tree-rings


    Completeness
    Completeness: 81%
    Chronology spans
    1670 to 2016
    Species
    Quercus rubra
    Quercus alba
    Quercus macrocarpa
    Carya ovata
    Fagus grandifolia
    Liriodendron tulipifera
    Acer saccharum
    Fraxinus nigra
    Juglans nigra
    Quercus montana
    Quercus palustris
    States
    IN
    Go to project
    Project Contents

    Data for 10 Plots, 371 Trees, 669 Cores

    Principal Investigator

    Justin T. Maxwell, Grant L. Harley, Scott M. Robeson.

    Laboratory

    Unknown

    Project Description

    In this project we were interested in comparing the climate response between multiple co-occurring species. While, we found that the general response was to June climate and that soil moisture was the leading driver of growth, we found distinct species-specific differences. The ongoing work aims at determining what drives these differences.


  • Back to Top

    Quercus rubra

  • Thumbnail for Project

    Climate response of co-occurring tree species using tree-rings


    Completeness
    Completeness: 81%
    Chronology spans
    1670 to 2016
    Species
    Quercus rubra
    Quercus alba
    Quercus macrocarpa
    Carya ovata
    Fagus grandifolia
    Liriodendron tulipifera
    Acer saccharum
    Fraxinus nigra
    Juglans nigra
    Quercus montana
    Quercus palustris
    States
    IN
    Go to project
    Project Contents

    Data for 10 Plots, 371 Trees, 669 Cores

    Principal Investigator

    Justin T. Maxwell, Grant L. Harley, Scott M. Robeson.

    Laboratory

    Unknown

    Project Description

    In this project we were interested in comparing the climate response between multiple co-occurring species. While, we found that the general response was to June climate and that soil moisture was the leading driver of growth, we found distinct species-specific differences. The ongoing work aims at determining what drives these differences.

  • Thumbnail for Project

    Growth of canopy red oak near its northern range limit: current trends, potential drivers, and implications for the future


    Completeness
    Completeness: 87%
    Chronology spans
    1866 to 2016
    Species
    Quercus rubra
    States
    VT
    Go to project
    Project Contents

    Data for 11 Plots, 214 Trees, 432 Cores

    Principal Investigator

    Rebecca Stern, Paul Schaberg, Shelly Rayback, Paula Murakami, Christopher Hansen, Gary Hawley

    Laboratory

    Schaberg/Hawley/Rayback Dendrochronology Collaborative

    Project Description

    We measured tree rings for 213 dominant and codominant red oak trees at 11 VT sites, and statistically compared growth to tree and stand characteristics and regional climate and pollutant deposition data. Because red oak wood is ring-porous, exhibiting a bimodal distribution of vessels, xylem growth can be easily partitioned into earlywood (EW) and latewood (LW) growth as well as whole-ring widths (WRW). Therefore, we evaluated relationships between WRW, LW and EW growth and environmental factors that may influence growth.

  • Thumbnail for Project

    SCBI Forest-GEO Complete Chronologies


    Completeness
    Completeness: 99%
    Chronology spans
    1777 to 2017
    Species
    Carya cordiformis
    Carya glabra
    Carya ovalis
    Carya tomentosa
    Fagus grandifolia
    Fraxinus americana
    Fraxinus nigra
    Juglans nigra
    Liliodendron tulipifera
    Pinus strobus
    Quercus alba
    Quercus montana
    Quercus rubra
    Quercus velutina
    States
    VA
    Go to project
    Project Contents

    Data for 1 Plot, 726 Trees, 726 Cores

    Principal Investigator

    Kristina Anderson-Teixeira

    Laboratory

    Unknown

    Project Description

    The Smithsonian Conservation Biology Institute (SCBI) large forest dynamics plot is located at the Smithsonian’s National Zoo and Conservation Biology Institute in Front Royal, VA, adjacent to the northern end of Shenandoah National Park. The plot is located at the intersection of three of the major physiographic provinces of the eastern US: the Blue Ridge, Ridge and Valley, and Piedmont provinces. The forest type is typical mature secondary eastern mixed deciduous forest, with a canopy dominated by tulip poplar (Liriodendron tulipifera), oaks (Quercus spp.), and hickories (Carya spp.), and an understory composed mainly of spicebush (Lindera benzoin), paw-paw (Asimina triloba), American hornbeam (Carpinus caroliniana), and witch hazel (Hamamelis virginiana). The SCBI forest plot is 25.6 ha (640 x 400 m), including a 4-ha fenced exclosure where white-tailed deer have been excluded since 1990, as well as three 1-ha Smithsonian Monitoring and Assessment of Biodiversity Program (SI-MAB) sites, with some sites surveyed several times since 1990. In 2010 and 2011, over 500 trees were cored in order to establish a baseline of dendrochronological data and gather background on the forest plot. In 2016 the annual mortality census was amended to include coring any tree marked dead. This practice was continued in 2017 when the current chronologies were created.


  • Back to Top

    Quercus velutina

  • Thumbnail for Project

    SCBI Forest-GEO Complete Chronologies


    Completeness
    Completeness: 99%
    Chronology spans
    1777 to 2017
    Species
    Carya cordiformis
    Carya glabra
    Carya ovalis
    Carya tomentosa
    Fagus grandifolia
    Fraxinus americana
    Fraxinus nigra
    Juglans nigra
    Liliodendron tulipifera
    Pinus strobus
    Quercus alba
    Quercus montana
    Quercus rubra
    Quercus velutina
    States
    VA
    Go to project
    Project Contents

    Data for 1 Plot, 726 Trees, 726 Cores

    Principal Investigator

    Kristina Anderson-Teixeira

    Laboratory

    Unknown

    Project Description

    The Smithsonian Conservation Biology Institute (SCBI) large forest dynamics plot is located at the Smithsonian’s National Zoo and Conservation Biology Institute in Front Royal, VA, adjacent to the northern end of Shenandoah National Park. The plot is located at the intersection of three of the major physiographic provinces of the eastern US: the Blue Ridge, Ridge and Valley, and Piedmont provinces. The forest type is typical mature secondary eastern mixed deciduous forest, with a canopy dominated by tulip poplar (Liriodendron tulipifera), oaks (Quercus spp.), and hickories (Carya spp.), and an understory composed mainly of spicebush (Lindera benzoin), paw-paw (Asimina triloba), American hornbeam (Carpinus caroliniana), and witch hazel (Hamamelis virginiana). The SCBI forest plot is 25.6 ha (640 x 400 m), including a 4-ha fenced exclosure where white-tailed deer have been excluded since 1990, as well as three 1-ha Smithsonian Monitoring and Assessment of Biodiversity Program (SI-MAB) sites, with some sites surveyed several times since 1990. In 2010 and 2011, over 500 trees were cored in order to establish a baseline of dendrochronological data and gather background on the forest plot. In 2016 the annual mortality census was amended to include coring any tree marked dead. This practice was continued in 2017 when the current chronologies were created.


  • Back to Top

    Thuja occidentalis

  • Thumbnail for Project

    Effects of multiaged silvicultural systems on reserve tree growth 19 years after establishment across multiple species in the Acadian forest in Maine


    Completeness
    Completeness: 76%
    Chronology spans
    1850 to 2013
    Species
    Pinus strobus
    Picea rubens
    Tsuga canadensis
    Acer rubrum
    Thuja occidentalis
    States
    ME
    Go to project
    Project Contents

    Data for 104 Plots, 718 Trees, 715 Cores

    Principal Investigator

    David R. Carter, Robert S. Seymour, Shawn Fraver, and Aaron Weitskittel

    Laboratory

    UMaine Orono

    Project Description

    This study investigated the growth response of mature, isolated reserve trees (n = 528) and their paired analogues from the control (n=190) in two multiaged silvicultural systems in the Acadian Forest Ecosystem Research Project (AFERP).

  • Thumbnail for Project

    Natural disturbance in an old-growth landscape of northern Maine


    Completeness
    Completeness: 88%
    Chronology spans
    1651 to 2001
    Species
    Fagus grandifolia
    Picea rubens
    Acer saccharum
    Abies balsamea
    Thuja occidentalis
    Betula alleghaniensis
    States
    ME
    Go to project
    Project Contents

    Data for 37 Plots, 1757 Trees, 1757 Cores

    Principal Investigator

    Shawn Fraver and Alan White

    Laboratory

    UMaine Orono

    Project Description

    We used tree-ring data from 37 plots, randomly located within the TNC’s Big Reed Forest Reserve, to reconstruct the history of natural disturbances in this old-growth landscape.


  • Back to Top

    Tsuga canadensis

  • Thumbnail for Project

    Effects of multiaged silvicultural systems on reserve tree growth 19 years after establishment across multiple species in the Acadian forest in Maine


    Completeness
    Completeness: 76%
    Chronology spans
    1850 to 2013
    Species
    Pinus strobus
    Picea rubens
    Tsuga canadensis
    Acer rubrum
    Thuja occidentalis
    States
    ME
    Go to project
    Project Contents

    Data for 104 Plots, 718 Trees, 715 Cores

    Principal Investigator

    David R. Carter, Robert S. Seymour, Shawn Fraver, and Aaron Weitskittel

    Laboratory

    UMaine Orono

    Project Description

    This study investigated the growth response of mature, isolated reserve trees (n = 528) and their paired analogues from the control (n=190) in two multiaged silvicultural systems in the Acadian Forest Ecosystem Research Project (AFERP).

  • Thumbnail for Project

    Eastern white pine and eastern hemlock growth: possible tradeoffs in response of canopy trees to climate and pollution


    Completeness
    Completeness: 100%
    Chronology spans
    1735 to 2016
    Species
    Tsuga canadensis
    Pinus strobus
    States
    VT
    Go to project
    Project Contents

    Data for 26 Plots, 507 Trees, 1996 Cores

    Principal Investigator

    Rebecca Stern, Paul Schaberg, Shelly Rayback, Paula Murakami, Christopher Hansen, Gary Hawley

    Laboratory

    Schaberg/Hawley/Rayback Dendrochronology Collaborative

    Project Description

    We measured tree rings for 507 dominant and codominant eastern white pine and eastern hemlock trees at 24 VT sites, and statistically compared growth to tree and stand characteristics and regional climate and pollutant deposition data.


  • Back to Top

    Jump to:

    Indiana
    Massachusetts
    Maryland
    Maine
    New Hampshire
    New York
    Pennsylvania
    Virginia
    Vermont

    Indiana

  • Thumbnail for Project

    Climate response of co-occurring tree species using tree-rings


    Completeness
    Completeness: 81%
    Chronology spans
    1670 to 2016
    Species
    Quercus rubra
    Quercus alba
    Quercus macrocarpa
    Carya ovata
    Fagus grandifolia
    Liriodendron tulipifera
    Acer saccharum
    Fraxinus nigra
    Juglans nigra
    Quercus montana
    Quercus palustris
    States
    IN
    Go to project
    Project Contents

    Data for 10 Plots, 371 Trees, 669 Cores

    Principal Investigator

    Justin T. Maxwell, Grant L. Harley, Scott M. Robeson.

    Laboratory

    Unknown

    Project Description

    In this project we were interested in comparing the climate response between multiple co-occurring species. While, we found that the general response was to June climate and that soil moisture was the leading driver of growth, we found distinct species-specific differences. The ongoing work aims at determining what drives these differences.


  • Back to Top

    Massachusetts

  • Thumbnail for Project

    Quantifying the legacy of foliar winter injury on woody aboveground carbon sequestration of red spruce trees


    Completeness
    Completeness: 100%
    Chronology spans
    1713 to 2010
    Species
    Picea rubens
    States
    VT, MA, NH
    Go to project
    Project Contents

    Data for 39 Plots, 380 Trees, 756 Cores

    Principal Investigator

    Alexandra Kosiba, Paul Schaberg, Gary Hawley

    Laboratory

    Schaberg/Hawley Lab

    Project Description

    In 2003, a severe region-wide event damaged over 90% of red spruce in the northeastern US. We assessed the influence of the 2003 winter injury event on long-term growth and C sequestration of red spruce trees by measuring the xylem growth (basal area increment) in forest stands in Vermont, New Hampshire, and Massachusetts where winter injury was quantified in 2003. To do this, we assessed dominant and co-dominant red spruce trees in 30 forest plots (10–15 trees per plot) from 14 locations that had been quantified for winter injury severity (visual assessment of damage to current-year foliage, ranging from 0% to 100%) in 2003 (a sub-set of the 27 locations and 176 plots assessed by Lazarus et al., 2004).

  • Thumbnail for Project

    Assessment of weather-associated causes of red spruce winter injury and consequences to aboveground carbon sequestration


    Completeness
    Completeness: 88%
    Chronology spans
    1743 to 2005
    Species
    Picea rubens
    States
    VT, NH, MA, NY
    Go to project
    Project Contents

    Data for 24 Plots, 241 Trees, 483 Cores

    Principal Investigator

    Paul Schaberg, Gary Hawley, and Brynne Lazarus

    Laboratory

    Schaberg/Hawley Lab

    Project Description

    We sought to investigate the environmental factors that may contribute to red spruce foliar winter injury and how much this injury influences tree carbon stores. We used a long-term record of winter injury in a plantation in New Hampshire and at 23 forested plots (in MA, NH, and VT) and conducted stepwise linear regression analyses with local weather and regional pollution data to determine which parameters helped account for observed injury.


  • Back to Top

    Maryland

  • Thumbnail for Project

    White oak and red maple tree cores from urban forest patches and reference sites


    Completeness
    Completeness: 97%
    Chronology spans
    1729 to 2015
    Species
    Quercus alba
    Acer rubrum
    States
    NY, MD, PA
    Go to project
    Project Contents

    Data for 18 Plots, 170 Trees, 336 Cores

    Principal Investigator

    Nancy F. Sonti, Richard A. Hallett, Kevin L. Griffin, and Joe H. Sullivan

    Laboratory

    Unknown

    Project Description

    Tree cores were collected to compare growth rates of two important native tree species (white oak (Quercus alba L.) and red maple (Acer rubrum L.)) across urban and reference forest sites of three major cities in the eastern United States (New York, NY (NYC); Philadelphia, PA; and Baltimore, MD). Trees were selected from secondary growth oak-hickory forests found in New York, NY; Philadelphia, PA; and Baltimore, MD, as well as at reference forest sites outside each metropolitan area.


  • Back to Top

    Maine

  • Thumbnail for Project

    Effects of multiaged silvicultural systems on reserve tree growth 19 years after establishment across multiple species in the Acadian forest in Maine


    Completeness
    Completeness: 76%
    Chronology spans
    1850 to 2013
    Species
    Pinus strobus
    Picea rubens
    Tsuga canadensis
    Acer rubrum
    Thuja occidentalis
    States
    ME
    Go to project
    Project Contents

    Data for 104 Plots, 718 Trees, 715 Cores

    Principal Investigator

    David R. Carter, Robert S. Seymour, Shawn Fraver, and Aaron Weitskittel

    Laboratory

    UMaine Orono

    Project Description

    This study investigated the growth response of mature, isolated reserve trees (n = 528) and their paired analogues from the control (n=190) in two multiaged silvicultural systems in the Acadian Forest Ecosystem Research Project (AFERP).

  • Thumbnail for Project

    Natural disturbance in an old-growth landscape of northern Maine


    Completeness
    Completeness: 88%
    Chronology spans
    1651 to 2001
    Species
    Fagus grandifolia
    Picea rubens
    Acer saccharum
    Abies balsamea
    Thuja occidentalis
    Betula alleghaniensis
    States
    ME
    Go to project
    Project Contents

    Data for 37 Plots, 1757 Trees, 1757 Cores

    Principal Investigator

    Shawn Fraver and Alan White

    Laboratory

    UMaine Orono

    Project Description

    We used tree-ring data from 37 plots, randomly located within the TNC’s Big Reed Forest Reserve, to reconstruct the history of natural disturbances in this old-growth landscape.

  • Thumbnail for Project

    Drivers of red spruce and balsam fir tree growth in mountains of the Northeastern US


    Completeness
    Completeness: 100%
    Chronology spans
    1900 to 2012
    Species
    Abies balsamea
    Picea rubens
    States
    NY, VT, NH, ME
    Go to project
    Project Contents

    Data for 40 Plots, 246 Trees, 246 Cores

    Principal Investigator

    Jay W. Wason, Colin M. Beier, John J. Battles, Martin Dovciak

    Laboratory

    SUNY ESF

    Project Description

    This project integrates with our broader research on montane spruce-fir forest responses to environmental change. In this project, we collected tree cores from red spruce and balsam fir trees along elevation gradients on 10 mountains across the northeastern US. We analyzed the tree rings to determine the extent to which climate and acidic deposition have driven recent tree growth patterns.

  • Thumbnail for Project

    NGCP Red Spruce Biogeochemistry


    Completeness
    Completeness: 99%
    Chronology spans
    1677 to 1993
    Species
    Picea rubens
    States
    NY, VT, NH, ME
    Go to project
    Project Contents

    Data for 8 Plots, 273 Trees, 508 Cores

    Principal Investigator

    Kevin T. Smith (NRS), Walter C. Shortle (NRS, retired), Gregory B. Lawrence (USGS)

    Laboratory

    Unknown

    Project Description

    At the invitation of the Northern Global Change Program, coordinated sampling and analysis was conducted for soil chemistry, dendrochronology, and dendrochemistry.


  • Back to Top

    New Hampshire

  • Thumbnail for Project

    Quantifying the legacy of foliar winter injury on woody aboveground carbon sequestration of red spruce trees


    Completeness
    Completeness: 100%
    Chronology spans
    1713 to 2010
    Species
    Picea rubens
    States
    VT, MA, NH
    Go to project
    Project Contents

    Data for 39 Plots, 380 Trees, 756 Cores

    Principal Investigator

    Alexandra Kosiba, Paul Schaberg, Gary Hawley

    Laboratory

    Schaberg/Hawley Lab

    Project Description

    In 2003, a severe region-wide event damaged over 90% of red spruce in the northeastern US. We assessed the influence of the 2003 winter injury event on long-term growth and C sequestration of red spruce trees by measuring the xylem growth (basal area increment) in forest stands in Vermont, New Hampshire, and Massachusetts where winter injury was quantified in 2003. To do this, we assessed dominant and co-dominant red spruce trees in 30 forest plots (10–15 trees per plot) from 14 locations that had been quantified for winter injury severity (visual assessment of damage to current-year foliage, ranging from 0% to 100%) in 2003 (a sub-set of the 27 locations and 176 plots assessed by Lazarus et al., 2004).

  • Thumbnail for Project

    Differential impacts of calcium and aluminum treatments on sugar maple and American beech growth dynamics


    Completeness
    Completeness: 75%
    Chronology spans
    1933 to 2008
    Species
    Acer saccharum
    Fagus grandifolia
    States
    NH
    Go to project
    Project Contents

    Data for 3 Plots, 180 Trees, 360 Cores

    Principal Investigator

    Joshua Halman, Paul Schaberg, Gary Hawley, Tim Fahey

    Laboratory

    Schaberg/Hawley Lab

    Project Description

    To evaluate the impact of changes in soil calcium and aluminum due to acid deposition, we examined sugar maple and American beech growth and forest composition at Hubbard Brook Experimental Forest (Thornton, New Hampshire) following a major ice storm in 1998. We measured xylem annual increment, foliar cation concentrations, American beech root sprouting, and tree mortality at the experimental nutrient perturbation (NuPert) plots located within HBEF where treatment plots had been amended with calcium or aluminium beginning in 1995.

  • Thumbnail for Project

    Forest condition change in northern Vermont: potential causes and implications for landscape-scale analysis


    Completeness
    Completeness: 78%
    Chronology spans
    1864 to 2010
    Species
    Abies balsamea
    Betula papyrifera
    Picea rubens
    Betula alleghaniensis
    Fagus grandifolia
    Pinus strobus
    Pinus resinosa
    Acer saccharum
    Acer rubrum
    States
    VT, NH
    Go to project
    Project Contents

    Data for 16 Plots, 253 Trees, 492 Cores

    Principal Investigator

    Aiko Weverka, Jen Pontius

    Laboratory

    Pointus and Schaberg/Hawley Labs

    Project Description

    In this study, the following questions were investigated: 1) Is there a relationship between measurements of basal area increment and vegetation indices derived from Landsat 5 TM data the same year 1984-2010? 2) If these relationships exist, are they stronger for certain vegetation indices, species types, or particular locations? 3) Is there some combination of multiple vegetation indices that can be used to model BAI across the landscape? To answer these questions, we analyzed tree growth for dominant species in Northern Vermont and New Hampshire.

  • Thumbnail for Project

    Red spruce growth comparison: calcium addition and reference watersheds at Hubbard Brook Experimental Forest, NH


    Completeness
    Completeness: 82%
    Chronology spans
    1888 to 2005
    Species
    Picea rubens
    States
    NH
    Go to project
    Project Contents

    Data for 6 Plots, 60 Trees, 120 Cores

    Principal Investigator

    Joshua Halman, Paul Schaberg, and Gary Hawley

    Laboratory

    Schaberg/Hawley Lab

    Project Description

    In 2006, we examined the annual growth of dominant and codominant red spruce trees growing in the reference watershed (WS6) and calcium-addition watershed (WS1) at Hubbard Brook Experimental Forest (Thorton, NH) to compare the effects of Ca-addition on red spruce growth dynamics.

  • Thumbnail for Project

    Assessing relationships between red spruce radial growth and pollution critical load exceedance values


    Completeness
    Completeness: 88%
    Chronology spans
    1825 to 2012
    Species
    Picea rubens
    States
    VT, NH
    Go to project
    Project Contents

    Data for 12 Plots, 137 Trees, 256 Cores

    Principal Investigator

    Ben Engel, Paul Schberg, Gary Hawley, Shelly Rayback

    Laboratory

    Schaberg/Hawley/Rayback Dendrochronology Collaborative

    Project Description

    In order to maximize the sample size and range of exceedance values assessed, this study utilized a large set of both pre-existing (Weverka, 2012, Kosiba et al., 2013, Kosiba et al., 2014) and newly collected red spruce xylem increment cores from VT and NH, for a total of 441 trees at 37 sites. These sites included 23 plots chosen to reflect a broad range of red spruce forest conditions (Weverka, 2012, Kosiba et al., 2013, Kosiba et al., 2014) and 14 new plots that were selected using a previously established critical load and exceedence model (NEG/ECP) to identify areas where: (1) red spruce were predicted to occur in the forest type module of the NEG/ECP model, (2) located on state and federal lands to streamline the issuance of collection permits, and (3) at locations where modeled exceedance values approach the positive and negative limits for the study area (−2 and +2 keq ha−1 y−1) to extend and balance the range of values assessed.

  • Thumbnail for Project

    Assessment of weather-associated causes of red spruce winter injury and consequences to aboveground carbon sequestration


    Completeness
    Completeness: 88%
    Chronology spans
    1743 to 2005
    Species
    Picea rubens
    States
    VT, NH, MA, NY
    Go to project
    Project Contents

    Data for 24 Plots, 241 Trees, 483 Cores

    Principal Investigator

    Paul Schaberg, Gary Hawley, and Brynne Lazarus

    Laboratory

    Schaberg/Hawley Lab

    Project Description

    We sought to investigate the environmental factors that may contribute to red spruce foliar winter injury and how much this injury influences tree carbon stores. We used a long-term record of winter injury in a plantation in New Hampshire and at 23 forested plots (in MA, NH, and VT) and conducted stepwise linear regression analyses with local weather and regional pollution data to determine which parameters helped account for observed injury.

  • Thumbnail for Project

    Drivers of red spruce and balsam fir tree growth in mountains of the Northeastern US


    Completeness
    Completeness: 100%
    Chronology spans
    1900 to 2012
    Species
    Abies balsamea
    Picea rubens
    States
    NY, VT, NH, ME
    Go to project
    Project Contents

    Data for 40 Plots, 246 Trees, 246 Cores

    Principal Investigator

    Jay W. Wason, Colin M. Beier, John J. Battles, Martin Dovciak

    Laboratory

    SUNY ESF

    Project Description

    This project integrates with our broader research on montane spruce-fir forest responses to environmental change. In this project, we collected tree cores from red spruce and balsam fir trees along elevation gradients on 10 mountains across the northeastern US. We analyzed the tree rings to determine the extent to which climate and acidic deposition have driven recent tree growth patterns.

  • Thumbnail for Project

    NGCP Red Spruce Biogeochemistry


    Completeness
    Completeness: 99%
    Chronology spans
    1677 to 1993
    Species
    Picea rubens
    States
    NY, VT, NH, ME
    Go to project
    Project Contents

    Data for 8 Plots, 273 Trees, 508 Cores

    Principal Investigator

    Kevin T. Smith (NRS), Walter C. Shortle (NRS, retired), Gregory B. Lawrence (USGS)

    Laboratory

    Unknown

    Project Description

    At the invitation of the Northern Global Change Program, coordinated sampling and analysis was conducted for soil chemistry, dendrochronology, and dendrochemistry.


  • Back to Top

    New York

  • Thumbnail for Project

    Balsam fir and red spruce growth trends along elevation on Whiteface Mountain, NY


    Completeness
    Completeness: 100%
    Chronology spans
    1769 to 2011
    Species
    Abies balsamea
    Picea rubens
    States
    NY
    Go to project
    Project Contents

    Data for 31 Plots, 114 Trees, 219 Cores

    Principal Investigator

    Martin Dovciak, Colin Beier, and Jay Wason

    Laboratory

    Dovciak Lab

    Project Description

    This research involved resampling a series of permanent plots established in the 1980's and collecting tree cores from red spruce and balsam fir at many of these sites to identify shifts in tree growth and demography associated with recent environmental changes. To do this, we studied tree species distributions along elevational gradients on 12 mountains in four states of the northeastern United States (New York, Vermont, New Hampshire, and Maine). See Wason et al. (2017) for more information.

  • Thumbnail for Project

    Assessment of weather-associated causes of red spruce winter injury and consequences to aboveground carbon sequestration


    Completeness
    Completeness: 88%
    Chronology spans
    1743 to 2005
    Species
    Picea rubens
    States
    VT, NH, MA, NY
    Go to project
    Project Contents

    Data for 24 Plots, 241 Trees, 483 Cores

    Principal Investigator

    Paul Schaberg, Gary Hawley, and Brynne Lazarus

    Laboratory

    Schaberg/Hawley Lab

    Project Description

    We sought to investigate the environmental factors that may contribute to red spruce foliar winter injury and how much this injury influences tree carbon stores. We used a long-term record of winter injury in a plantation in New Hampshire and at 23 forested plots (in MA, NH, and VT) and conducted stepwise linear regression analyses with local weather and regional pollution data to determine which parameters helped account for observed injury.

  • Thumbnail for Project

    Drivers of red spruce and balsam fir tree growth in mountains of the Northeastern US


    Completeness
    Completeness: 100%
    Chronology spans
    1900 to 2012
    Species
    Abies balsamea
    Picea rubens
    States
    NY, VT, NH, ME
    Go to project
    Project Contents

    Data for 40 Plots, 246 Trees, 246 Cores

    Principal Investigator

    Jay W. Wason, Colin M. Beier, John J. Battles, Martin Dovciak

    Laboratory

    SUNY ESF

    Project Description

    This project integrates with our broader research on montane spruce-fir forest responses to environmental change. In this project, we collected tree cores from red spruce and balsam fir trees along elevation gradients on 10 mountains across the northeastern US. We analyzed the tree rings to determine the extent to which climate and acidic deposition have driven recent tree growth patterns.

  • Thumbnail for Project

    NGCP Red Spruce Biogeochemistry


    Completeness
    Completeness: 99%
    Chronology spans
    1677 to 1993
    Species
    Picea rubens
    States
    NY, VT, NH, ME
    Go to project
    Project Contents

    Data for 8 Plots, 273 Trees, 508 Cores

    Principal Investigator

    Kevin T. Smith (NRS), Walter C. Shortle (NRS, retired), Gregory B. Lawrence (USGS)

    Laboratory

    Unknown

    Project Description

    At the invitation of the Northern Global Change Program, coordinated sampling and analysis was conducted for soil chemistry, dendrochronology, and dendrochemistry.

  • Thumbnail for Project

    White oak and red maple tree cores from urban forest patches and reference sites


    Completeness
    Completeness: 97%
    Chronology spans
    1729 to 2015
    Species
    Quercus alba
    Acer rubrum
    States
    NY, MD, PA
    Go to project
    Project Contents

    Data for 18 Plots, 170 Trees, 336 Cores

    Principal Investigator

    Nancy F. Sonti, Richard A. Hallett, Kevin L. Griffin, and Joe H. Sullivan

    Laboratory

    Unknown

    Project Description

    Tree cores were collected to compare growth rates of two important native tree species (white oak (Quercus alba L.) and red maple (Acer rubrum L.)) across urban and reference forest sites of three major cities in the eastern United States (New York, NY (NYC); Philadelphia, PA; and Baltimore, MD). Trees were selected from secondary growth oak-hickory forests found in New York, NY; Philadelphia, PA; and Baltimore, MD, as well as at reference forest sites outside each metropolitan area.


  • Back to Top

    Pennsylvania

  • Thumbnail for Project

    White oak and red maple tree cores from urban forest patches and reference sites


    Completeness
    Completeness: 97%
    Chronology spans
    1729 to 2015
    Species
    Quercus alba
    Acer rubrum
    States
    NY, MD, PA
    Go to project
    Project Contents

    Data for 18 Plots, 170 Trees, 336 Cores

    Principal Investigator

    Nancy F. Sonti, Richard A. Hallett, Kevin L. Griffin, and Joe H. Sullivan

    Laboratory

    Unknown

    Project Description

    Tree cores were collected to compare growth rates of two important native tree species (white oak (Quercus alba L.) and red maple (Acer rubrum L.)) across urban and reference forest sites of three major cities in the eastern United States (New York, NY (NYC); Philadelphia, PA; and Baltimore, MD). Trees were selected from secondary growth oak-hickory forests found in New York, NY; Philadelphia, PA; and Baltimore, MD, as well as at reference forest sites outside each metropolitan area.


  • Back to Top

    Virginia

  • Thumbnail for Project

    SCBI Forest-GEO Complete Chronologies


    Completeness
    Completeness: 99%
    Chronology spans
    1777 to 2017
    Species
    Carya cordiformis
    Carya glabra
    Carya ovalis
    Carya tomentosa
    Fagus grandifolia
    Fraxinus americana
    Fraxinus nigra
    Juglans nigra
    Liliodendron tulipifera
    Pinus strobus
    Quercus alba
    Quercus montana
    Quercus rubra
    Quercus velutina
    States
    VA
    Go to project
    Project Contents

    Data for 1 Plot, 726 Trees, 726 Cores

    Principal Investigator

    Kristina Anderson-Teixeira

    Laboratory

    Unknown

    Project Description

    The Smithsonian Conservation Biology Institute (SCBI) large forest dynamics plot is located at the Smithsonian’s National Zoo and Conservation Biology Institute in Front Royal, VA, adjacent to the northern end of Shenandoah National Park. The plot is located at the intersection of three of the major physiographic provinces of the eastern US: the Blue Ridge, Ridge and Valley, and Piedmont provinces. The forest type is typical mature secondary eastern mixed deciduous forest, with a canopy dominated by tulip poplar (Liriodendron tulipifera), oaks (Quercus spp.), and hickories (Carya spp.), and an understory composed mainly of spicebush (Lindera benzoin), paw-paw (Asimina triloba), American hornbeam (Carpinus caroliniana), and witch hazel (Hamamelis virginiana). The SCBI forest plot is 25.6 ha (640 x 400 m), including a 4-ha fenced exclosure where white-tailed deer have been excluded since 1990, as well as three 1-ha Smithsonian Monitoring and Assessment of Biodiversity Program (SI-MAB) sites, with some sites surveyed several times since 1990. In 2010 and 2011, over 500 trees were cored in order to establish a baseline of dendrochronological data and gather background on the forest plot. In 2016 the annual mortality census was amended to include coring any tree marked dead. This practice was continued in 2017 when the current chronologies were created.


  • Back to Top

    Vermont

  • Thumbnail for Project

    Comparative growth trends of five Northern hardwood and montane tree species along elevational transects in Mt. Mansfield State Forest


    Completeness
    Completeness: 100%
    Chronology spans
    1737 to 2012
    Species
    Abies balsamea
    Picea rubens
    Acer rubrum
    Acer saccharum
    Betula alleghaniensis
    States
    VT
    Go to project
    Project Contents

    Data for 9 Plots, 268 Trees, 479 Cores

    Principal Investigator

    Alexandra Kosiba, Paul Schaberg, Gary Hawley, Shelly Rayback

    Primary Contact

    Alexandra Kosiba

    Laboratory

    Schaberg/Hawley/Rayback Dendrochronology Collaborative

    Project Description

    We set up elevational transects were set up in three of the four watersheds on Mt. Mansfield (Underhill, VT): Brown’s River, Stevensville Brook, and Ranch Brook Watersheds. Along each of these transects, three plots were selected – one within each of the following elevational zones: low (450-650 m asl), mid (750-850 m) and high (900-1000 m) (n plots = 9), which align with northern hardwoods, transition, and montane spruce-fir ecotones. Plots contained 10-14 dominant or co-dominant trees of each of the target tree species with approximately equal distribution around plot center in attempts to avoid differing competition pressures between trees. We sampled red maple, sugar maple, and red spruce at low elevation; sugar maple, yellow birch, and red spruce at mid elevation; and red spruce and balsam fir at high elevation. Due to differential species densities across the landscape, plots were of variable radius.

  • Thumbnail for Project

    Quantifying the legacy of foliar winter injury on woody aboveground carbon sequestration of red spruce trees


    Completeness
    Completeness: 100%
    Chronology spans
    1713 to 2010
    Species
    Picea rubens
    States
    VT, MA, NH
    Go to project
    Project Contents

    Data for 39 Plots, 380 Trees, 756 Cores

    Principal Investigator

    Alexandra Kosiba, Paul Schaberg, Gary Hawley

    Laboratory

    Schaberg/Hawley Lab

    Project Description

    In 2003, a severe region-wide event damaged over 90% of red spruce in the northeastern US. We assessed the influence of the 2003 winter injury event on long-term growth and C sequestration of red spruce trees by measuring the xylem growth (basal area increment) in forest stands in Vermont, New Hampshire, and Massachusetts where winter injury was quantified in 2003. To do this, we assessed dominant and co-dominant red spruce trees in 30 forest plots (10–15 trees per plot) from 14 locations that had been quantified for winter injury severity (visual assessment of damage to current-year foliage, ranging from 0% to 100%) in 2003 (a sub-set of the 27 locations and 176 plots assessed by Lazarus et al., 2004).

  • Thumbnail for Project

    Potential role of soil calcium in recovery of paper birch following ice storm injury in Vermont


    Completeness
    Completeness: 87%
    Chronology spans
    1920 to 2006
    Species
    Betula papyrifera
    Betula papyrifera var. cordifolia
    States
    VT
    Go to project
    Project Contents

    Data for 12 Plots, 175 Trees, 350 Cores

    Principal Investigator

    Joshua Halman, Paul Schaberg, and Gary Hawley

    Laboratory

    Schaberg/Hawley Lab

    Project Description

    In 2006, we assessed crown health, radial growth, and available soil cations at 12 paper birch (Betula papyrifera and B. papyrifera var. cordifolia) sites located in the north-central Green Mountains, Vermont, as a preliminary assessment of factors that may be influencing paper birch decline. Selected plot locations overlapped with previous aerial mapping of paper birch decline, and we avoided areas known to have been affected by insect outbreaks in 2004 and 2005. Nine of the sites were located at three different elevations on each of three different mountain-slopes in order to assess tree health and soil nutrition across an elevational gradient. Three plots per site were established within areas known to have experienced moderate ice storm damage in 1998 and 3-4 dominant or co-dominant birch trees closest to plot center were sampled for tree and soil assessments. At higher elevations, sample trees included heart-leafed paper birch. All sites contained dominant and co-dominant paper birch with sugar maple and/or red spruce as companion species. Understory vegetation was highly variable depending on both aspect and elevation, though hobblebush (Viburnum alnifolium) and striped maple (Acer pensylvanicum) were present on most plots. Soils were usually Spodosols with generally well defined Oa, E, and B horizons, except at some upper elevations where soils were either Histosols or Entisols (i.e., no B horizon present).

  • Thumbnail for Project

    Forest condition change in northern Vermont: potential causes and implications for landscape-scale analysis


    Completeness
    Completeness: 78%
    Chronology spans
    1864 to 2010
    Species
    Abies balsamea
    Betula papyrifera
    Picea rubens
    Betula alleghaniensis
    Fagus grandifolia
    Pinus strobus
    Pinus resinosa
    Acer saccharum
    Acer rubrum
    States
    VT, NH
    Go to project
    Project Contents

    Data for 16 Plots, 253 Trees, 492 Cores

    Principal Investigator

    Aiko Weverka, Jen Pontius

    Laboratory

    Pointus and Schaberg/Hawley Labs

    Project Description

    In this study, the following questions were investigated: 1) Is there a relationship between measurements of basal area increment and vegetation indices derived from Landsat 5 TM data the same year 1984-2010? 2) If these relationships exist, are they stronger for certain vegetation indices, species types, or particular locations? 3) Is there some combination of multiple vegetation indices that can be used to model BAI across the landscape? To answer these questions, we analyzed tree growth for dominant species in Northern Vermont and New Hampshire.

  • Thumbnail for Project

    Assessing relationships between red spruce radial growth and pollution critical load exceedance values


    Completeness
    Completeness: 88%
    Chronology spans
    1825 to 2012
    Species
    Picea rubens
    States
    VT, NH
    Go to project
    Project Contents

    Data for 12 Plots, 137 Trees, 256 Cores

    Principal Investigator

    Ben Engel, Paul Schberg, Gary Hawley, Shelly Rayback

    Laboratory

    Schaberg/Hawley/Rayback Dendrochronology Collaborative

    Project Description

    In order to maximize the sample size and range of exceedance values assessed, this study utilized a large set of both pre-existing (Weverka, 2012, Kosiba et al., 2013, Kosiba et al., 2014) and newly collected red spruce xylem increment cores from VT and NH, for a total of 441 trees at 37 sites. These sites included 23 plots chosen to reflect a broad range of red spruce forest conditions (Weverka, 2012, Kosiba et al., 2013, Kosiba et al., 2014) and 14 new plots that were selected using a previously established critical load and exceedence model (NEG/ECP) to identify areas where: (1) red spruce were predicted to occur in the forest type module of the NEG/ECP model, (2) located on state and federal lands to streamline the issuance of collection permits, and (3) at locations where modeled exceedance values approach the positive and negative limits for the study area (−2 and +2 keq ha−1 y−1) to extend and balance the range of values assessed.

  • Thumbnail for Project

    Assessment of weather-associated causes of red spruce winter injury and consequences to aboveground carbon sequestration


    Completeness
    Completeness: 88%
    Chronology spans
    1743 to 2005
    Species
    Picea rubens
    States
    VT, NH, MA, NY
    Go to project
    Project Contents

    Data for 24 Plots, 241 Trees, 483 Cores

    Principal Investigator

    Paul Schaberg, Gary Hawley, and Brynne Lazarus

    Laboratory

    Schaberg/Hawley Lab

    Project Description

    We sought to investigate the environmental factors that may contribute to red spruce foliar winter injury and how much this injury influences tree carbon stores. We used a long-term record of winter injury in a plantation in New Hampshire and at 23 forested plots (in MA, NH, and VT) and conducted stepwise linear regression analyses with local weather and regional pollution data to determine which parameters helped account for observed injury.

  • Thumbnail for Project

    Drivers of red spruce and balsam fir tree growth in mountains of the Northeastern US


    Completeness
    Completeness: 100%
    Chronology spans
    1900 to 2012
    Species
    Abies balsamea
    Picea rubens
    States
    NY, VT, NH, ME
    Go to project
    Project Contents

    Data for 40 Plots, 246 Trees, 246 Cores

    Principal Investigator

    Jay W. Wason, Colin M. Beier, John J. Battles, Martin Dovciak

    Laboratory

    SUNY ESF

    Project Description

    This project integrates with our broader research on montane spruce-fir forest responses to environmental change. In this project, we collected tree cores from red spruce and balsam fir trees along elevation gradients on 10 mountains across the northeastern US. We analyzed the tree rings to determine the extent to which climate and acidic deposition have driven recent tree growth patterns.

  • Thumbnail for Project

    Growth of canopy red oak near its northern range limit: current trends, potential drivers, and implications for the future


    Completeness
    Completeness: 87%
    Chronology spans
    1866 to 2016
    Species
    Quercus rubra
    States
    VT
    Go to project
    Project Contents

    Data for 11 Plots, 214 Trees, 432 Cores

    Principal Investigator

    Rebecca Stern, Paul Schaberg, Shelly Rayback, Paula Murakami, Christopher Hansen, Gary Hawley

    Laboratory

    Schaberg/Hawley/Rayback Dendrochronology Collaborative

    Project Description

    We measured tree rings for 213 dominant and codominant red oak trees at 11 VT sites, and statistically compared growth to tree and stand characteristics and regional climate and pollutant deposition data. Because red oak wood is ring-porous, exhibiting a bimodal distribution of vessels, xylem growth can be easily partitioned into earlywood (EW) and latewood (LW) growth as well as whole-ring widths (WRW). Therefore, we evaluated relationships between WRW, LW and EW growth and environmental factors that may influence growth.

  • Thumbnail for Project

    NGCP Red Spruce Biogeochemistry


    Completeness
    Completeness: 99%
    Chronology spans
    1677 to 1993
    Species
    Picea rubens
    States
    NY, VT, NH, ME
    Go to project
    Project Contents

    Data for 8 Plots, 273 Trees, 508 Cores

    Principal Investigator

    Kevin T. Smith (NRS), Walter C. Shortle (NRS, retired), Gregory B. Lawrence (USGS)

    Laboratory

    Unknown

    Project Description

    At the invitation of the Northern Global Change Program, coordinated sampling and analysis was conducted for soil chemistry, dendrochronology, and dendrochemistry.

  • Thumbnail for Project

    Eastern white pine and eastern hemlock growth: possible tradeoffs in response of canopy trees to climate and pollution


    Completeness
    Completeness: 100%
    Chronology spans
    1735 to 2016
    Species
    Tsuga canadensis
    Pinus strobus
    States
    VT
    Go to project
    Project Contents

    Data for 26 Plots, 507 Trees, 1996 Cores

    Principal Investigator

    Rebecca Stern, Paul Schaberg, Shelly Rayback, Paula Murakami, Christopher Hansen, Gary Hawley

    Laboratory

    Schaberg/Hawley/Rayback Dendrochronology Collaborative

    Project Description

    We measured tree rings for 507 dominant and codominant eastern white pine and eastern hemlock trees at 24 VT sites, and statistically compared growth to tree and stand characteristics and regional climate and pollutant deposition data.

  • Thumbnail for Project

    Growth trends and environmental drivers of major tree species of the Northern Hardwood Forest


    Completeness
    Completeness: 100%
    Chronology spans
    1740 to 2016
    Species
    Acer rubrum
    Betula alleghaniensis
    Fagus grandifolia
    Acer saccharum
    States
    VT
    Go to project
    Project Contents

    Data for 30 Plots, 688 Trees, 4095 Cores

    Principal Investigator

    Rebecca Stern, Paul Schaberg, Shelly Rayback, Paula Murakami, Christopher Hansen, Gary Hawley

    Laboratory

    Schaberg/Hawley/Rayback Dendrochronology Collaborative

    Project Description

    We measured tree rings for 688 dominant and codominant sugar maple, red maple, yellow birch and American beech trees at 30 VT sites, and statistically compared growth to tree and stand characteristics and regional climate and pollutant deposition data.

  • Thumbnail for Project

    White oak chronologies of the Champlain Valley of Vermont


    Completeness
    Completeness: 99%
    Chronology spans
    1630 to 2016
    Species
    Quercus alba
    States
    VT
    Go to project
    Project Contents

    Data for 4 Plots, 53 Trees, 108 Cores

    Principal Investigator

    Schaberg, P.G., Murakami, P.F., Hansen, C.F., D’Amato, A.W., and Murray, H.F.

    Laboratory

    Unknown

    Project Description

    This is a collection of white oak cores collected in the Champlain Valley of Vermont. Two trees in this collection can be dated back to 1662 and 1630 with one individual probably originating before the year 1580.


  • Back to Top

    Search for projects in the database by entering a keyword or by setting constraints using the advanced search options.

    Map search coming soon
    A tree core displayed in the field Photo: Paula Murakami

    About the DendroEcological Network

    The DendroEcological Network (DEN), is a collaborative effort among the U.S.D.A. Forest Service's Northern Research Station, the University of Vermont (College of Arts and Sciences and the Rubenstein School of the Environment and Natural Resources) and the Forest Ecosystem Monitoring Cooperative. The goal of the database is to provide a central, long-term archiving platform for data derived from dendroecological studies, including tree-ring-based chronologies and their associated ecological data. Currently, no such integrative database exists and many dendroecological collections are unavailable to the research and management communities for comparative and larger-scale analyses.

    The DEN also includes species and age classes not commonly found in other databases. DEN is intended for the free and public use by the scientific and natural resource communities, facilitating the investigation and synthesis of dendroecological and forest ecology data across space and time. DEN fully supports information sharing, collaboration and discovery, and implements the best available standards for data archive, documentation and interoperability including the Tree Ring Data Standard and Ecological Metadata Language.

    Read the DendroEcological Network Version 1.0 Technical Report to learn more about the data model and technical implementation of the DEN

    Fog at Chestnut Orchard Photo: Paula Murakami

    Why Contribute Your Data?

    DEN offers both a long-term archiving platform for dendroecological and associated data and the cyberinfrastructure to share, explore and integrate data from multiple sites. These benefits help scientists to meet granting agency requirements for the storage and dissemination of publicly funded data collection and research, increase visibility of research through the tracking and citation of data, and extend and leverage data in combination with other studies archived on the site.

    Through DEN, data usability is enhanced, furthering, for example, large scale modeling studies, mixed method studies combining remote sensing and dendroecological data, or productivity studies within and across species, space and time. The more data are shared on DEN, the greater the return will be for the individual user, and the scientific and natural resource communities.

    To maintain the rigor of the overall resource, the DEN is currently limited to only accept datasets containing cores that were cross-dated.

    We are currently working on a web-based interface for adding data to the database directly, giving contributors ultimate control over how their data are accessed. We expect this feature to be available later in 2018.

    Interested in archiving data in the DendroEcological Network? We can help get your data stored with one-on-one service! Please contact us or e-mail the Forest Ecosystem Monitoring Cooperative at femc@uvm.edu to learn more about how you can get involved!

    We have also provided a Data Management Plan Template you can use in grant proposals requiring data archiving at the end of the project.

    The People Behind the DendroEcological Network

    This cooperative effort was initiated by nearly a dozen people interested in bringing together ecological field data with dendrochronological data on trees. The people working to continue the initial construction of the database are:

    Paul Schaberg
    Research Plant Physiologist, USDA Forest Service Northern Research Station

    Shelly Rayback
    Associate Professor, Department of Geography, University of Vermont

    Jim Duncan
    Director, Forest Ecosystem Monitoring Cooperative

    Chris Hansen
    Research Technician, Rubenstein School of Environment and Natural Resources, University of Vermont

    Paula Murakami
    Biological Sciences Laboratory Technician, USDA Forest Service Northern Research Station

    Alexandra Kosiba
    Project Coordinator, Forest Ecosystem Monitoring Cooperative

    Contact Us

    Red Rocks Park, South Burlington, Vermont Photo: Paula Murakami

    Questions about the DendroEcological Network? Have a suggestion for the team? We would love to hear from you!

    Please visit the contact page to send us a message, or you can reach the team by e-mailing the Forest Ecosystem Monitoring Cooperative at femc@uvm.edu.