Family and Consumer Sciences Education

What is it?
How is the job market?
What else could I do with this major?
What courses will I take?
What else should I know about this major?         Are there graduate programs?
Who can I contact for more information?  





What is it?

     Family and Consumer Sciences (FCS) focuses on helping individuals and families through education to manage their resources, both human and material. The national standards for FCS include these areas:

·Family, Career, and Community Connections 
·Human Development
·Family
·Interpersonal Relationships
·Parenting
·Nutrition and Wellness
·Family and Consumer Resources

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How is the job market?

     Our program is especially appropriate for students who wish to teach Family and Consumer Sciences to youth and adults, both in school and outside the classroom in the community. The job market for teachers in this field is excellent, in the state and throughout the nation, where there are more than three openings for every graduate in the field, according to the U.S. Department of Education. For example, in 1998 there were 8,000 teaching positions available in the field nationwide, 20 in VT with one graduate, and 50 in MA with three graduates in that state. Although most FCS graduates teach at the middle and high school levels, they also can become licensed to teach in occupational programs, including human services and/or culinary arts. In addition, many students work for endorsements to teach health, science, or other subjects.

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What else could I do with this major?

     Because the Family and Consumer Sciences Education program is so comprehensive, graduates have a variety of career choices in business, social agencies, and different types of educational programs. Graduates work in these areas:

·Family, Career, and Community Connections 
·Cooperative Extension including 4-H
·Trade Associations
·Textbook Companies
·Newspaper and Magazine Publishers
·Government Agencies
·Television Channels and Radio Stations
·Food Companies
·Curriculum Development Centers
·Educational Media Producers
·Scout Programs; Big Brother, Big Sister, and Buddy Programs
·Employee Training Programs

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What courses will I take?

     Family and Consumer Sciences Education majors complete the basic distribution requirements for a bachelor of science degree from the College of Agriculture and Life Sciences. You will also choose a series of family and consumer sciences courses to fill program requirements such as:

·Human Relationships and Sexuality
·Fundamentals of Nutrition
·Basic Concepts of Food
·Interpersonal Relationships
·Child Development
·Personal and Family Finance
·Housing


You would also take courses that focus on:

·Methods in Nutrition Education
·Curriculum Development
·Evaluation Techniques
·Laboratory Management
·Working with Youth Organizations


     To obtain your teaching license as an undergraduate, you'll student teach for 12-15 credit hours. Student teaching takes you into Vermont communities where you'll put your classroom knowledge to work and gain teaching experience.

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What else should I know about this major?

     Besides having excellent employment opportunities, this profession helps you balance work and family which is a critical issue in society today. You will always be learning material and gaining information that helps you both personally and professionally. No other career option interfaces the two most important components of your life any better.

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Are there graduate programs?

     There are both Master of Arts in Teaching and Master of Education degrees available with concentrations in Family and Consumer Sciences Education. The minimum number of required credit hours is 30, but individual programs vary widely depending on courses taken as an undergraduate and experience. Students work for licensure unless they are already credentialed. There are three areas in which courses are required:

·Curriculum Development
·Evaluation
·Research Methods

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Who can I contact for more information?

     Write, call, or e-mail the coordinator of the program:

Valerie M. Chamberlain
106 Terrill Hall
University of Vermont
Burlington, VT 05405
802-656-0035
e-mail: vchamber@zoo.uvm.edu



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College of Agriculture and Life Sciences

College of Education

Department of Nutrition and Food Sciences