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Can Trees Actually Deter Crime?

Atlantic LogoThe results of a new study led by Austin Troy, associate professor in the Rubenstein School of Environment and Natural Resources, first published in the journal Landscape and Urban Planning, are covered by The Atlantic, Grist and SmartPlanet, among other media outlets. The research, for which Troy and his colleagues ran models to analyze the relationship between tree canopy and crime in Baltimore -- controlling for factors known to influence crime statistics such as income, race and population density -- showed that a 10 percent increase in tree canopy was associated with a roughly 12 percent decrease in crime. Read the story at Atlantic.com...

An Ultrasound 'Ballast Blaster'

Wall Street Journal LogoThe Wall Street Journal blog "Ideas Market" features an invention co-created by physics professor Junru Wu that, through the use of ultrasound, has been shown to kill virtually all E. coli and other bacteria in ballast water, as well as creatures that elude filters, including water fleas, plankton and zebra mussels. It works by causing gas bubbles within the organisms to violently vibrate, rupturing key structures. Ballast water from international cargo ships has been introducing invasive species into the Great Lakes and elsewhere, which the new method could manage without the use of chemicals. Read the post at WSJ.com...

2012's Best Commencement Speeches

Daily Beast logoIn the company of Harvard, Princeton, Sarah Lawrence and NYU, with speakers from Steve Carell to Justice Sonia Sotomayor, UVM's commencement speech was named among the best in 2012 by The Daily Beast. Watch the video at DailyBeast.com...

'Precipice or Crossroads?'

Inside Higher Ed logoOn the publication of his book, Precipice or Crossroads? Where America's Great Public Universities Stand and Where They Are Going Midway Through Their Second Century, Inside Higher Ed interviews Daniel Mark Fogel, professor of English and former UVM president. Fogel discusses the significance of the 150-year-old Morrill Act that established the land-grant university and his views on the fate of pubic higher education. The book, a collection of essays, was co-edited by English lecturer Elizabeth Maison-Huddle. Fogel was also quoted in the Washington Post. Read the interview at InsideHigherEd.com...

Changing a Food System from Big and Slow to Fast and Nimble

Fast Company logoCynthia Belliveau, dean of Continuing Education, contributed this article to Fast Company's online column co.EXIST. Just ahead of UVM's first international food summit, Belliveau says that while our current food system is unsustainable, she believes with smaller regional models such as Vermont's, "we can support life on planet Earth from seed-to-plate, without destroying it." Read the story at FastCoExist.com...

A Golden Age of Proverbs

Boston Globe LogoThe Boston Globe features a new work co-edited by Professor Wolfgang Mieder, The Dictionary of Modern Proverbs. As the story suggests, while proverbs may seem inherently traditional, the collaborators insist that new proverbs are created through current pop cultural sources such as songs, television and movies -- and they have presented "a huge number of proverbial bits of wisdom and advice from the 20th century onward, all meticulously documented" to prove it. Read the story at BostonGlobe.com...

Manning: Social Science Suffers in Our National Parks

Roll Call LogoProfessor Robert Manning, director of the Park Studies Laboratory in the Rubenstein School of Environment and Natural Resources, in this editorial for Roll Call, the newspaper of Capitol Hill, argues that unnecessary obstruction from the Office of Management and Budget is blocking much needed social science research that could lead to better management of national parks. Read the story at RollCall.com...

Biodiversity Loss From Species Extinctions May Rival Pollution and Climate Change Impacts

Earth Times LogoCarol Adair, assistant professor in the Rubenstein School of Environment and Natural Resources, collaborated on research published in the journal Nature showing that loss of biodiversity may have a potentially devastating effect on the planet. The authors, who have gotten attention from Earth Times and other media, urge environmental policymakers to take the threat as seriously as climate change. Read the story at EarthTimes.org...

Shelf Life: Emily Bernard's Carl Van Vechten and the Harlem Renaissance

The NationIn it's review of English professor Emily Bernard's book, Carl Van Vechten and the Harlem Renaissance: A Portrait in Black and White, The Nation calls the work "incisive, careful and illuminating." Read the story at TheNation.com...

Ingredients for Success in Vermont Wine

The Boston Globe Logo The Boston Globe profiles alumna Christina Castegren '01 and her Vermont winery, Fresh Tracks. Read the story at TheBostonGlobe.com...

Brain Networks Linked to Teen Drug Abuse

VOA LogoVoice of America talked with Robert Whelan, research associate in the department of psychiatry, about the results of the largest-ever imaging study of the human brain, in which he and his colleagues found brain differences in teenagers that might be a marker for substance abuse. Whelan allows that there are many factors that influence why a teen might use drugs but says they have likely uncovered an important piece in the puzzle. Read the story at VOANews.com...

The Single Theory That Could Explain Emergence, Organisation and the Origin of Life

Technological Review LogoMIT's Technological Review online "View" column enthusiastically introduces new work by complex systems expert Stuart Kauffman and colleagues who have been looking at the broad mathematical properties of autocatalytic sets, coming "to an astonishing conclusion that could have remarkable consequences for our understanding of complexity, evolution and the phenomenon of emergence." Read the story at TechnologyReview.com...

Misdiagnosis of Multiple Sclerosis is Costing Health System Millions Per Year

Science Daily LogoAndrew Solomon, M.D., assistant professor of neurology and lead author of a study published in Neurology, the medical journal of the American Academy of Neurology, talks to Science Daily about research he conducted with colleagues in Oregon showing that misdiagnosis of multiple sclerosis is a common -- and expensive -- problem with "significant consequences for patients and for our health care system as a whole." Read the story at ScienceDaily.com...

Reclaiming Rhetoric for the Modern Age

NPR LogoComplex systems expert Stuart Kauffman, an experimental and theoretical biologist, frequently posts on National Public Radio's blog, "13.7: Cosmos and Culture." In this post Kaufman reflects on how he believes the term "rhetoric" is used in modern life as a means of verbal manipulation, in contrast to his recent discovery of how it was used in ancient Greece, when citizens were called to make a real-life choice in the absence of necessary facts. "Rhetoric" then, according to Kaufman, "evolved as the 'art' of reasonably persuading one's peers of a course of action in the face of uncertainty." If faith in science as absolute truth has superseded that, he cautions, we should rethink because "facts" can be mistaken or become irrelevant over time. Read the post at NPR.org... Kauffman also contributed "The Power of Finland's 'Kalevala,'" "Estonia and the Wisdom of the Ages," "Laws of Unintended Consequence: A Warning to Policy Makers" (co-author) and "The Ultimate Crack Down: We Know Not What We Do (co-author)."

More select print stories

The Real Wealth of Nations

The Economist cites the work of Taylor Ricketts, professor and director of the Gund Institute for Ecological Economics, in its argument supporting a recent United Nations report that attempts to calculate physical, human and natural capital as part of a nation's wealth rather than settling for GDP alone. Rickets, by example, has been calculating the value of bee pollination, determining that one Costa Rican coffee grower benefited by $62,000 a year from feral honey bees in two nearby patches of forest. Read the story at Economist.com...

'Life Everlasting:' Death as Nature's Ultimate Recycling Agent

The Seattle Times reviews emeritus professor and naturalist Bernd Heinrich's new book, Life Everlasting: The Animal Way of Death, calling it a "tribute to the majesty, wonder and beauty of the natural world." Read the story at SeattleTimes.com...

The Perfected Self

Jean Harvey-Berino, chair of nutrition and food sciences, contributes her expertise in developing successful weight loss programs to this Atlantic article defending the long-denounced Harvard psychologist B.F. Skinner and his behavior modification theories. Willpower doesn't work, according to Harvey-Berino. "What works," she says, "heavily relies on Skinner -- shaping behavior over time by giving feedback, and setting up environments where people aren't stimulated to eat the wrong foods." Read the story at Atlantic.com...

Weight Loss Reduces Cancer Risk Factor

In Science News, biochemist Russell Tracy explains that fat is not simply passive energy storage but an active endocrine organ that can cause chronic inflammation known to contribute to many serious health conditions. Read the story at ScienceNews.org...

10 Most Entrepreneurial States

CNN Money, explaining Vermont's ranking in their top ten entrepreneurial states, notes that "many innovative firms get their start in incubators based at the state's top-notch schools," such as UVM's College of Medicine, adding that "such academic powerhouses also help produce a highly skilled workforce for entrepreneurs to hire." Read the story at Money.CNN.com...

Arab Winter, Arab Spring

In its review of a new book on the rise and fall of Arab presidents, Inside Higher Ed quotes heavily from the work of professor of political science Gregory Gause, whose analysis helps put the book into context. Read the story at InsideHigherEd.com...

Test Your Knowledge on Sugar

Nutrition professor and spokesperson for the American Heart Association Rachel Johnson tells USA Today that sugar consumption, especially from sugar-sweetened beverages, is out of control in light of research tying a high intake of added sugars to many poor health conditions such as obesity, high blood pressure and type 2 diabetes. Read the story at USAToday.com...

Itching for a Bite of the Lice Business

Barbara Frankowski, M.D. sounds a note of caution in this Businessweek story on the trend of businesses offering costly, in-home lice removal services. Read the story at Businessweek.com...

Taking Away Recess Bad for ADHD Kids, Experts Say

Among other studies cited, this Live Science story looking at the benefits of exercise for children with ADHD notes the work of psychology professor Betsy Hoza who ran an eight-week study in which kids with ADHD ages five to eight participated in 30 minutes of moderate to vigorous exercise before school. Hoza reports that the children showed improvements in impulsivity and aggression and were less likely to interrupt others. Read the story at LiveScience.com...

When Grandkids Ask for Money

Daniel Van Der Vliet, director of the Family Business Initiative, answers questions for Fox Business about issues surrounding loaning money to relatives. Read the column at FoxBusiness.com...

Washington Must Learn to Live with the Islamists

Among other editorials for GulfNews.com, political scientist Gordon Robison makes the case that an Islamist-dominated Egypt is a larger concern for the U.S. than Syria or Iran and that politicians need diplomatic strategies for working with Muslim leaders. Read the story at GulfNews.com...

UVM Students Put Wetland Restoration Study to the Test

The Burlington Free Press follows Bill Keeton, associate professor in the Rubenstein School, and his Restoration Ecology service-learning class out to Charlotte where, with hoes, shovels, saws and axes they worked to return a low-lying meadow back to the wetland habitat it once was, planting along the way some 900 native trees and shrubs. Read the story at BurlingtonFreePress.com...

University of Vermont Students Share Marketing Know-How

The Burlington Free Press features a two-semester business class, the Cabot Marketing Challenge in which students are funded to help devise marketing plans for two local businesses in need of "advice and elbow grease." Read the story at BurlingtonFreePress.com...

Community Support One Pathway for Small Farmers to Make a Go of It in Vermont

Mark Cannella, director of the Extension Farm Viability Program, wrote this piece for the Burlington Free Press about UVM's New Farmer Program and its efforts to help farmers find creative funding to build and operate their businesses. Read the story at BurlingtonFreePress.com...

University of Vermont's Global Push Begins in China

The U.S.-Sino Pathway Program is featured in the Burlington Free Press to illustrate a larger effort by the university to attract international students, as well as to expand study-abroad programs and to recruit more students who have resettled in Vermont as refugees -- all comprising an effort to create globally savvy students. Read the story at BurlingtonFreePress.com...

Hops and Change

UVM assistant professor and agricultural researcher Heather Darby talks with Seven Days about the university's experimental hops field, a project in its infancy as researchers and Vermont beer brewers work out the complexities of the crop and aim for hops that produce first-class "uberlocal" beers. Read the story at SevenDaysVT.com...

My Turn: Common Assets and Cap-and-Trade

Julia Rumery, a senior in the community development and applied economics department, contributed this op-ed to the Burlington Free Press advocating for cap-and-trade policies to remedy "the market failure that allows exploitation of common assets." Contact University Communications for information.

New Vermont Law Will Ask UVM Institute to Measure 'Genuine Progress'

Vermont Business magazine reports on a new law charging the Gund Institute for Ecological Economics to devise a means of measuring economic progress beyond GDP as a tool for identifying public policy priorities, including factors such as environmental protection and human rights. Read the story at VermontBiz.com...

Students Learn Real-World Skills by Building Projects

The Addison County Independent features a class taught by the Rubenstein School's David Raphael, Sustainable Landscape Architecture and Construction, a service-learning course that teaches students to design, plan and construct environmentally friendly infrastructure projects, here a boardwalk for Vergennes Union Elementary School to bridge wetlands to the school's outdoor classroom. Read the story at AddisonIndependent.com...

New England's Other Syrup

Birch syrup, a product being tested by UVM's Proctor Maple Research Center to see if it can be profitable using modern maple syrup equipment, is the subject of this Bennington Banner story. With its high water content and tendency to scorch, birch syrup is a tricky commodity to produce. The reward, however, is the price: $25 for an 8-ounce bottle this season. Contact University Communications for information.

Attention Tinkers, UVM FabLab Open

The Burlington Free Press announces UVM's FabLab, which will make rapid-prototyping tools available to Vermonters while offering the opportunity to interact with others who are developing and testing innovative products and ideas. The lab is a partnership between the College of Engineering and Continuing Education's Center for Leadership and Innovation. Contact University Communications for information.

UVM Prof Discusses Entergy's Travails in Vermont

The Brattleboro Reformer discusses Entergy with assistant research professor Richard Watts after the publication of his book, Public Meltdown. Contact University Communications for information.

University of Vermont Research Project Receives $5M Grant

The Burlington Free Press reports on a prestigious grant from the National Science Foundation, the Innovative Graduate Education and Research Traineeship, which UVM will apply to supporting doctoral students and faculty in a transdisciplinary smart grid project. Read the story at BurlingtonFreePress.com...

The Making of a Burlington Cocoa Baron

Jim Lampman '72, founder and president of Lake Champlain Chocolates, is profiled by the Burlington Free Press. Contact University Communications for information.

National Fellowships Accomplishments Put UVM in Good Company

Vermont Business magazine reports that UVM was one of only seven institutions this year to have winners in four of the country's prestigious and highly competitive award competitions, the Truman, Udall, Goldwater and Boren scholarships. Read the story at VermontBiz.com...

Looking for a Gallstone on the Internet

The Burlington Free Press features a collaboration between UVM and universities overseas in which radiologists, using new technology that combines robotics, ultrasound imaging and videoconferencing, could offer patients in remote places such as Uganda, with few medical specialists, the benefit of sophisticated diagnostics that could improve their care. Contact University Communications for information.

Vermont Children's Hospital selected for US News & World Report's 'Best Children's Hospitals' List

Lewis First, M.D., chief of pediatrics, speaks to Vermont Business magazine about the selection of Vermont in US News and World Report's list of best children's hospitals. Read the story at VermontBiz.com...

UVM's Interim Steward Looks Back

The Burlington Free Press features an exit interview with interim President John Bramley. Read the story at BurlingtonFreePress.com...

Voice of Vermont: Beyond the Localvore Bubble

In an op-ed for the Burlington Free Press, Emily Brodsky, a graduate student studying ecological planning, makes a case for teaching -- not preaching -- as Vermont works to move to a more locally based food system. Contact University Communications for information.

In a Tour of Historic Homes, the Wells House Is a Showstopper

In advance of Burlington's tour of historic homes, Seven Days features the Wells House, currently being restored, through private donation, to become the university's Alumni House. Renovation experts quoted in the piece are united in their admiration of the building: "the craftsmanship in it just makes me cry. It's almost a spiritual experience," and, according to another, "it's one of the most beautiful buildings in the state." Read the story at SevenDaysVT.com...

'We Can Develop a Connection and Commitment to Our Communities'

In this essay for the Burlington Free Press, graduate student Liz Brownlee explains her belief in the value of meaningful work -- a sense of purpose, pride and belonging. Read the story at BurlingtonFreePress.com...

13 Vermont Students Working as Irene 'Recovery Interns'

As the cleanup from Irene continues still, the Burlington Free Press, in this story about a summer internship for Vermont college students, focuses on junior Hillary Laggis, who completed the service learning course "Rebuilding Vermont" and got hooked. "I just fell in love with it," she says. "It was kind of exciting to be a part of the immediate relief and now I'm working toward the long term recovery." Contact University Communications for information.

UVM Emerges on National Track and Field Stage

The Burlington Free Press looks at the growing success of UVM's track and field program as three athletes head for the NCAA championships. Read the story at BurlingtonFreePress.com...

UVM Women's Basketball Team Supports Local Bereavement Camp

The women's basketball team, according to this Burlington Free Press story, chosen as one of 32 winners for the "Pack the House" NCAA challenge, used their grant donation to cover the tuition for ten families to attend the Visiting Nurse Association's bereavement camp. Contact University Communications for information.

Pomp and SpongeBob Share UVM's 209th Commencement

In its coverage of the university's 2012 commencement ceremony, the Burlington Free Press reports on the remarks of Governor Shumlin and interim President Bramley, as well as the honorary degree recipients, but focuses on commencement speaker and alumna Cyma Zarhami and on her surprise guests, in particular the addition of a performance by the man behind the voice of the character SpongeBob SquarePants, "an apt presence... for his relentless optimism." Contact University Communications for information.