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Featured stories in the media

Robots Evolve More Natural Ways of Walking

Wired Logo Wired magazine's "Gadget Lab" features first-of-their-kind robots created by scientist Josh Bongard. Using both computer simulations and real-world Legos, Bongard shows how robots that undergo body change, like tadpoles becoming frogs, learn how to walk faster -- and are harder to tip over -- than traditional robots. The story was featured in dozens of outlets, including Popular Science, New Scientist, the National Science Foundation's news website and the Boston Globe (see below). Bongard was also interviewed on Voice of America's science program, "Our World." Read the story and watch a video of the robots at Wired.com...

An Anthropologist's Alternative to 'Alternative' Spring Break: Stay Home

Chronicle LogoThe Chronicle of Higher Education features anthropology professor Robert Gordon in a Q & A exploring his views on deliberate, thoughtful travel, as well as the benefits of staying home: "'you can "go abroad" in your hometown by just walking around and engaging local people and by having a sense of enchantment.'" Read the article at Chronicle.com...

Saudis Transfixed by Protests In Egypt

NPR LogoAll Things Considered reporter in Riyadh interviews Middle East expert Gregory Gause on the Saudi obsession with events in Egypt and what that might -- or might not -- mean for the region. Gause was interviewed again a few days later on the economic response to turmoil in the region: "Can Arab Leaders Spend Their Way out of Discontent?" Listen to the Feb.3 interview and to the Feb. 7 interview at NPR.org...

More select print stories

Artificial Intelligence Based on Darwinís Idea

The Boston Globe's business and technology section writes, "In an engineering first, and using the same processes of natural selection that made humans so clever, UVM roboticist Josh Bongard has created robots -- both real and simulated -- whose body shapes change as they learn to walk." Read the story at Boston.com...

Small Spreads of Breast Cancer May Not Affect Survival

U.S. News & World Report's "HealthDay" looks at new research published in the New England Journal of Medicine by Donald Weaver, M.D., professor of pathology, showing that micromatastases -- smaller than 2 millimeters -- have minimal impact on overall breast cancer survival. Weaver's work confirms that the standard procedure -- sentinel lymph node biopsy, developed at UVM -- is effective at detecting significant metastases. Read the article at USNews.com...

Green Giants: the Eco Power List

The Guardian's "Observer" names professor of environmental studies Saleem Ali among its 20 global figures who will be setting the environmental agenda in the coming year. Read the article at Guardian.co.uk...

Raw Milk Cheesemakers Fret Over Possible New Rules

The New York Times talks to Dennis D'Amice, senior research scientist at the Vermont Institute for Artisan Cheese at the University of Vermont, about current federal rules for aging raw milk cheese for 60 days and his recent research with institute co-director Catherine Donnelly showing that toxic E. coli could survive in cheese for more than a year. Read the article at NYTimes.com...

State of Emergency in Bahrain After Deadly Crackdown; Opposition Party Withdraws

Political scientist Gregory Gause helps the Washington Post analyze the role of the king in Bahrain's unrest. Read the story at WashingtonPost.com...

When All Isnít Enough to Foil Alzheimer's

The New York Times features writer Nancy Bercaw's moving essay about her family's experience with Alzheimer's. Bercaw is a staff member in UVM's libraries and former assistant swim coach at the university. Read the story at NYTimes.com...

African-American Poetry Speaks to Culture and Tradition

Associate professor of English Major Jackson represents the new voice in poetry according to this Houston Chronicle feature story on poet and activist Nikki Giovanni's new collection of the best African American poems, a "gorgeous house to be in," Jackson tells the Chronicle. Read the article at HoustonChronicle.com...

Sculptor Also Had a Dream: Honoring King with Art

The Washington Post features alumnus Chris Sharp '87 and his realized dream of sculpting Martin Luther King in heavy bronze as gifts for President Obama and others across the country. Read the article at WashingtonPost.com...

Feeling SAD? How to Cope When the Sun Goes Away

Doctoral candidate Yael Nillni, talks to MSNBC.com about research suggesting that cognitive behavioral therapy could work better over the long run than light therapy for patients suffering from seasonal affective disorder. Read the article at MSNBC.com...

Sculptor George Anthonisen Fills Bucks Home with Art

This Philadelphia Inquirer magazine feature explores the life, home and extensive art collection of internationally renowned sculptor and UVM alumnus George Anthonisen '61. Contact University Communications for more information.

Pulling Out Feathers: Group Living Stresses Ravens

New research by Bernd Heinrich, professor emeritus of biology, shows that ravens become stressed living in large groups according to this LiveScience.com story. A Portland Press Herald story, "Birding: Don't Underestimate the Raven," also cites Heinrich's extensive study of ravens. Read the Live Science article and the Portland Press Herald article...

Sports Medicine: It's Called Phantom Foot, but It's a Real Problem

The Portland Press Herald reports on research led by Robert Johnson, M.D. that can help skiers learn to control falls, dramatically reducing their risk of an ACL injury. Read the article at PressHerald.com...

A New American Political Age

In an editorial for Gulfnews.com, political scientist Gordon Robison looks at current political discourse in light of the shooting of Congresswoman Gabrielle Giffords. In a second piece, "Will Obama Walk The Talk In Tunisia?" Robison writes about the decisions facing Obama as the Arab people challenge their governments. Read the Gulfnews.com stories here and here.

As Bats Die Off, Vermont Panel Seeks Endangered Status

Biologist William Kilpatrick reported to the state Endangered Species Committee about the dire circumstances facing little brown bats and northern long-eared bats, both critical to the ecosystem as a control on mosquitoes and agricultural insect pests, according to this story in the Burlington Free Press. Contact University Communications for more information.

UVM Scholar Catalogues, Analyzes Martin Luther King, Jr.'s Favorite Sayings

The Burlington Free Press features Professor Wolfgang Mieder and his latest volume analyzing proverbs in the speeches of Martin Luther King, Jr. Contact University Communications for more information.

UVM Researcher Helps Warn of Avalanches

Skier and associate professor of computer science Christian Skalka has developed a new smart-phone application he calls "the Stabilitron" to help assess the risk of an avalanche, reports the Burlington Free Press. Contact University Communications for more information.

Searching for the Soul of Town Meeting in Starksboro

The Burlington Free Press features political science professor Frank Bryan and his research and analysis of the New England town meeting tradition, scholarship that dates back to 1969. Read the article at BurlingtonFreePress.com...

Oscar-nominated Director's Path Started in Burlington

Alumna Sara Nesson '97 is featured in the Burlington Free Press as she prepares to attend the Oscars with her short documentary, Poster Girl, in contention for an Academy Award. Read the article at BurlingtonFreePress.com...

Vermont Wins EISA Championship with Ease

The Burlington Free Press announces the UVM ski team's taking its 31st Eastern Regional Championship. Read the article at BurlingtonFreePress.com...

PechaKucha Night Picks Up More Devotees in Vermont

Seven Days notes the success of PechaKucha hosted by the Fleming Museum, an exciting rapid-fire presentation by local artists who have 20 seconds to display and discuss 20 images of their work. Read the article at SevenDaysVT.com...