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Featured stories in the media

Happy Words Trump Negativity in the English Language

Wired Wired magazine's science blog features the results of a study led by 2011 graduate Isabel Kloumann along with applied mathematicians Chris Danforth and Peter Dodds working in the University of Vermont's Advanced Computing Center. According to the story, the researchers used "overwhelming mathematical force" to analyze 361 billion words used in databases from Google Books, Twitter, The New York Times and lyrics from popular songs. Read the story at Wired.com...

Sociology in the Storms

Inside Higher Ed Logo On the heels of Hurricane Irene, Inside Higher Ed features associate professor Alice Fothergill in a story about the fast-growing field of disaster sociology, in which researchers "examine how traditional areas of inquiry, such as issues related to race, gender or social class, unfold in extreme situations." Fothergill's work, the article notes, includes a study of the 1997 floods in North Dakota, which prompted the largest evacuation in U.S. history in more than a century, as well as her current research tracking children displaced by Hurricane Katrina. Read the story at InsideHigherEd.com...

Libyan Drama

NPR LogoPolitical scientist Gregory Gause is a guest on NPR's program On Point, to discuss events then unfolding in Libya as rebels poured into Tripoli. Listen to the interview at OnPoint.WBUR.org...

Local Wheat Sees Revival in Former Grain States

Associated Press Logo An Associated Press story that ran in The New York Times and numerous other publications notes the university's major role in helping farmers grow wheat in New England. Among other UVM aid, agronomist Heather Darby says she's working on strategies such as choosing the most suitable grains and improving harvesting practices. Read the article at HuffingtonPost.com...

Continuing Peace Effort is Best Response to Mumbai Tragedy

National Geographic Logo Saleem Ali, professor of environmental studies, in a blog post for National Geographic, laments the proximity of the crisis in Mumbai to a meeting of the "Young Global Leaders," including those from Pakistan and India. "Having a peace forum in Mumbai within a few months after another spate of tragic attacks may seem fanciful," he writes, "but would in fact be the best antidote to extremism." Read the post at NewsWatch.NationalGeographic.com...

A Downward Spiral? Economics Made Too Simple

NPR LogoComplex systems expert Professor Stuart Kauffman, an experimental and theoretical biologist, contributed a post on National Public Radio's blog, "13.7: Cosmos and Culture," here, somewhat playfully, comparing the economy to physical energy, starting with "an 'Economic First Law of Motion... Trade or die.'" Read the post at NPR.org...

More select print stories

Arab Spring Pits Saudi Security Against U.S. Support for Change

Bloomberg goes to professor Gregory Gause to help analyze the relationship between the U.S. and Saudi Arabia after the Arab uprising. Read the article at BusinessWeek.com...

Analysis: Saudi Switch Against Syria's Assad is Blow to Iran

Again, political scientist Gregory Gause is called on, here by Reuters, for his Middle East expertise analyzing the threat Saudi Arabia feels by the violence in Syria. Read the story at Reuters.com...

Migraines: More Than Just a Headache

Robert Shapiro, M.D., professor of neurology, helps explain to CNN.com the complex brain state and the potentially severe disability of migraines. Read the story at CNN.com...

Sugary Drinks Add 300 Calories a Day to Youths' Diets

Rachel Johnson, professor of nutrition and a spokeswoman for the American Heart Association, tells USA Today that sugar-sweetened beverages are the No. 1 single source of calories in the American diet, accounting for about half of all of the sugars that people consume. Read the story at USAToday.com...

Seed-to-Plate: How the University of Vermont is Cultivating Food Systems as an Academic Discipline

In this essay picked up by Reuters and elsewhere, Cynthia Belliveau, dean of Continuing Education, makes the case for UVM as a model for transdisciplinary education emphasizing regionally-scaled, sustainable food systems. Read the story at UKReuters.com...

Living through Layoffs

The Chicago Tribune, in a story about surviving a job search, talks with Rocki-Lee DeWitt, management professor in the School of Business, about the importance of presenting a positive attitude to potential employers, no matter how long you've been looking. Read the story at ChicagoTribune.com...

GOP Moderates Shrinking in Numbers - and Impact

The Boston Globe seeks the expertise of political scientist Garrison Nelson on the increasing move of the Republican base to the right with, he puts it more emphatically, 'a zealousness and single-mindedness that hadn't been in the party before.' Read the story at Boston.com...

Field Report: Music Archaeology, Digging the Hits of Yesteryear

Classics professor John Curtis Franklin weighs in for The Chronicle of Higher Education on music archaeology, expressing skepticism about popular "pseudo-ritualistic" recreations of ancient music. Read the story at Chronicle.com...

Tubing the Gunpowder: Bring Back the Mellow

The Baltimore Sun consults with Rubenstein School professor Robert Manning, expert on park management, about how to control the use -- and regain the peace -- of Baltimore County's Gunpowder River. Read the story at BaltimoreSun.com...

Washington's Lunatic Fringe Dominates Mainstream Politics

Among other editorials for Gulfnews.com, political scientist Gordon Robison makes the case that while there have always been extreme ideologues on both the left and the right, mainstream Republican leaders now seem unwilling to publicly break from their far-right base. Read the article at Gulfnews.com...

Same Symptoms: Simulation Lab Trains Medical Workers

The Times Argus reports on the new Fletcher Allen/University of Vermont Clinical Simulation Lab, that will allow medical students and practicing professionals to do "mock codes" on a high fidelity mannequin, honing their skills before practicing on a patient in crisis. Read the article at TimesArgus.com...

Fungi Combats Stinky Vermin to Save Vermont Produce

The Burlington Free Press reports on researchers at work in the University of Vermont's bio-research facility to stop a pest that has caused tens of millions of dollars in damage to produce growers on the East Coast: the brown marmorated stink bug. The goal is to sift through thousands of fungi in hopes of finding their last, and best, defense against the pest. If found, this species-specific and deadly fungus would kill only the brown marmorated stink bug and leave other, less-harmful creatures uninjured. Read the story at BurlingtonFreePress.com...

Three Cartoonists Walk into a Panel

The Burlington Free Press features a summer exhibition at the Fleming Museum: "Edward Koren: The Capricious Line." The exhibition premiered at Columbia University's Wallach Gallery -- the Fleming has the distinction of being the only other venue that will exhibit these works by the Vermont cartoonist. The article notes that while Koren spoke of the transience of cartoons, the exhibition allows time for more reflection as the works are viewed on a museum wall. Contact University Communications for information.

Vermonters are Getting Fatter, but not as Fast as Folks in Other States

The Burlington Free Press talks to UVM nutritionists about obesity and healthful eating. Jean Harvey-Berino, chair of nutrition and food science, says Vermonters should be more aware of the calories they consume in a day and increase their physical activity. At the same time, nutrition professor Rachel Johnson stresses that societal changes, such as milk in vending machines, are as important as individual efforts. Read the story at BurlingtonFreePress.com...

Nature Calling

Seven Days reviews conservation biologist Joe Roman's book, Listed: Dispatches from America's Endangered Species Act, which examines the effects, good and bad, since the act was passed nearly four decades ago. Read the article at SevenDaysVT.com...

Burlington Cars Littered With Aphid Droppings

Entomologist Margaret Skinner discusses with the Burlington Free Press the intricate world of insects people are missing in the lower branches of trees. Read the story at BurlingtonFreePress.com...

Hard Rain

Seven Days talks with state climatologist and professor of geology Lesley-Ann Dupigny-Giroux about the myriad factors that went into the making of Tropical Storm Irene and the extreme damage it left in its wake. Don't be too quick to call it climate change. Read the article at SevenDaysVT.com...

Earthquake sends Vermonters to Social Media

Keith Klepeis, professor of geology whose specialty includes plate tectonics and earthquakes explained to the Burlington Free Press how a quake originating in the Washington, D.C. area could be felt 600 miles away. Contact University Communications for information.