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Featured stories in the media

Are Some Teenagers Wired for Addiction?

WSJ LogoThe results of the largest imaging study of the adolescent brain ever conducted, led by neuroimaging expert Robert Whelan and associate professor of psychiatry Hugh Garavan, are featured by The Wall Street Journal, CBS News, The Atlantic and the UK's Daily Mail on Sunday, among other major media outlets. The research, first published in the journal Nature Neuroscience, indicates that some teenagers are more impulsive than their peers because their brains are wired differently, making them more inclined to abuse drugs and alcohol. The scientists also found that, while teens with ADHD and those with a history of alcohol, cigarette and illegal drug use had equal trouble performing the task they were asked to perform, the diminished brain activity was associated with different impulse-control networks. Read the story at WSJ.com...

Once Drab and Outdated, U. of Vermont Building is Now a Sustainability Showcase

Chronicle LogoTaking note of the renovation of the Aiken Center, this Chronicle of Higher Education feature says the building "may be one of the greenest buildings on any college campus, making it a fitting home for the university's Rubenstein School for the Environment and Natural Resources." The story details Aiken's evolution from an aging building to one that is estimated to be 65 percent more efficient with striking new aesthetics and "living machine" systems that serve double-duty as teaching tools. Read the story at Chronicle.com...

'Cheese and Culture: A History of Cheese and Its Place in Western Civilization'

Washington Post LogoCheese scientist Paul Kindstedt, co-director of the Vermont Institute for Artisan Cheese, is drawing attention from The Washington Post and other media for his new book, Cheese and Culture, which delves into what he has discovered to be the enormous historical and anthropological impact of this 9,000-year-old dietary staple. Read a review at WashingtonPost.com... and an interview with Kindstedt at BurlingtonFreePress.com...

Catamounts Go Back to the Tournament

New York Times Logo"It's a dream realized," Catamount coach John Becker tells The New York Times of his unlikely journey from coaching a division III basketball team and working an IT job to taking UVM to the N.C.A.A. tournament his first year as head coach (and ultimately winning a game there). Becker's and UVM's story is also featured in The International Business Times, Sports Illustrated and Yahoo Sports. Read the story at NYTimes.com...

Warhol’s Working-Class Superheroes

Salon LogoSalon features a Q & A with Anthony Grudin, assistant professor of art and art history, on his interest in the early work of Andy Warhol, which he believes is far more complex and calculated than earlier scholars had assumed it to be. "Warhol," Grudin says, "is interested in mass culture's own challenges and frustrations: the ways in which it produces desire and frustration in its audiences, and the ways in which it encourages that audience to participate in the production and reproduction of culture." Read the story at Salon.com...

Chagas Disease More Common in U.S. Than Thought

My Health NewsA new study led by biologist Lori Stevens and published in the journal Emerging Infectious Diseases, suggests that Chagas disease, a parasitic infection that occurs mostly in Latin America, could be less rare in the U.S. than previously estimated. Stevens and her colleagues collected DNA from the blood of 13 triatomine bugs -- the insects that carry the parasite -- found in Arizona and Southern California. Five of the bugs had fed on human blood, though none were carrying the parasite. The findings indicate, Stevens says, a large amount of feeding on humans and the potential for cases of Chagas in people that haven't yet been detected. Read the story at MyHealthNews.com...

Life Laughs at the Limits of Science

NPR LogoComplex systems expert Stuart Kauffman, an experimental and theoretical biologist, frequently posts on National Public Radio's blog, "13.7: Cosmos and Culture." In this post Kaufman calls faith in science our new secular religion, warning of the belief that humans can foresee relevant variables and optimize outcomes. Read the post at NPR.org... Kauffman also contributed "Darwin, Survival of the Fittest and Arrival of the Fittest," "Current Work on the Origin of Life," "Beyond Darwin: Niche Creation and Creative Evolution," "Aristotle's Formal Cause and Biological Laws Beyond Entailing Laws," "Information Theory Does Not Apply to the Evolution of the Biosphere" and "The Evolution of the Biosphere and Econosphere are Self Creative."

More select print stories

Truly Food For Thought

In this trend story about the emerging academic field of food studies, The New York Times notes UVM's food systems minor and new master's programs and the university's multidisciplinary approach to the complex issues surrounding sustainable agriculture. Read the story at NYTimes.com...

How Parents Can help Their Kids Get a Job After College

In a story about what parents should -- and shouldn't -- do to help their children get a job, Forbes cites as their top example of how to get it right the story of Sasha Fisher '10, who studied community development work and interned at a non-profit that helped rebuild schools in the Sudan. When Fisher graduated, her mother paid her way to Kigali and partially funded a project for the nonprofit Spark MicroGrants. Two years later, Fisher is executive director of Spark and has raised tens of thousands of dollars that have gone to projects such as building sewer systems and installing electricity in Rwanda and Uganda. Read the story at Forbes.com...

Hiding Vegetables in Other Foods Isn’t Going to Make Kids Healthy

The Atlantic features the results of UVM nutrition research first published in the Journal of Nutrition Education and Behavior that offered children the same vegetable-added baked goods, in some cases labeling the ingredient, in some cases not. The results show that kids rank foods containing broccoli and zucchini as tasting no different whether the vegetable was indicated on the label or not. The exception was chickpeas, which were less familiar, suggesting that children are more likely to eat vegetables they know, no sneaking necessary. Read the story at Atlantic.com...

Nuclear Power in New England: Lessons for Ecological Diplomacy

This guest post by Richard Watts, assistant research professor of community development and applied economics, on Prof. Saleem Ali's NationalGeographic.com blog offers perspectives from his new book on environmental conflicts around the license renewal of the Vermont Yankee nuclear power plant. Read the post at NationalGeographic.com...

Faces in the Crowd

Amy Glen '12 is picked as one of Sports Illustrated's "Faces in the Crowd" for her win in the 15K classic at the NCAA Division I ski championships, her first personal collegiate win and a big boost to UVM in capturing its first title since 1994 with a record 161-point margin of victory. Read the story at SportsIllustrated.com...

Female Skiers Likelier to Injure Non-Dominant Knee

Reuters tapped the expertise of Robert Johnson, M.D., sports medicine physician, to help explain new research showing that not only are women skiers more likely than men to injure a knee while skiing, they are twice as likely to have that injury occur to their non-dominant leg. Read the story at News.Yahoo.com...

Saudi Recalls Cairo Envoy in Blow to Egypt Ties

Middle East expert Gregory Gause talks to Reuters about how national pride and the growing impulse towards democracy in the region affect foreign policy. Read the story at Reuters.com...

Snow White Coffins of Siachen

Qatar's Gulf Times asks environmental studies professor Saleem Ali about workable conflict resolution solutions between Pakistan and India over the Siachen Glacier. Read the story at GulfTimes.com...

Advice for Diet Soda Lovers: Skip The Chips

NPR's blog "The Salt" talks with nutrition professor and American Heart Association spokesperson Rachel Johnson about consumption of diet soda and weight gain. The consensus? According to Johnson, the unsweetened soda is fine, but compensating with calories from other foods, as many do, negates the effort. Read the post at NPR.com...

Health Discovery: Lose Belly Fat to Save Your Heart

Nutrition professor Rachel Johnson also adds to this AARP Bulletin, warning that, while research shows low-carb diets can lead to weight-loss without adversely affecting the heart, individuals need to find a diet they can live on for the long term to keep from regaining weight. Read the post at AARP.org...

10 Biggest Digestive Myths Debunked

Peter L. Moses, M.D., professor in the division of gastroenterology and hepatology, sets the record straight for Everyday Health about what helps -- and what doesn't -- with digestive health. Read the story at EverydayHealth.com...

Is 2012 A Rerun of the 2002 Pre-Iraq Invasion Buildup?

Among other editorials for GulfNews.com, political scientist Gordon Robison wonders if diplomacy will be enough to keep the U.S. out of war with Iran. Read the column at GulfNews.com...

UVM and Lake Monsters Sign Long-Term Lease

The Burlington Free Press reports on an agreement -- offered by interim President John Bramley and publicly signed at the historic Centennial Field -- to turn control of the land over to the Lake Monsters minor-league baseball team for one dollar a year for 20 years, keeping the game part of the life of the community. Contact University Communications for information.

UVM Prof Tells Tale of Vermont Yankee’s Political Meltdown

This Burlington Free Press feature examines research assistant professor Richard Watt's new book, Public Meltdown: The Story of the Vermont Yankee Nuclear Power Plant. Read the story at BurlingtonFreePress.com...

University of Vermont Students Showcase Research Projects

The Burlington Free Press features UVM's student research conference at which 365 students made oral presentations or appeared with their posters, a testament, says Abu Rizvi, dean of the Honors College, "to the university's commitment to engage students in research." Read the story at BurlingtonFreePress.com...

UVM Joins 'Real Food' Movement

The Burlington Free Press and Vermont Business magazine write about the university becoming the fifth school in the country to sign on to the "Real Food Challenge," promising that 20 percent of the food served on campus by 2020 will meet the standards of the program: food that "nourishes producers, consumers, communities and the earth." The pledge to feed 15,000 people more sustainably, interim President John Bramley says, complements UVM's commitment to research in food systems as a spire of excellence. Read the stories at BurlingtonFreePress.com... and VermontBiz.com...

Highgate Man a Truman Scholar

The St. Albans Messenger profiles senior social work major and Iraq War veteran Brent Reader, the first native Vermonter to become a Truman Scholar, a highly competitive national award which recognizes those who want to make a difference in public service and "provide(s) them with financial support for graduate study, leadership training, and fellowship with other students who are committed to making a difference through public service." Contact University Communications for information.

Heart of Art: Art as a Pathway to Political Compromise

Former Vermont governor and UVM distinguished visiting scholar Madeleine Kunin contributed this article to the Burlington Free Press about the value of the arts in her own life and her view that there are lessons in making and appreciating art that might encourage politicians to be more constructive policymakers. Read the story at BurlingtonFreePress.com...

UVM Dean: 'You Cannot Solve Environmental Problems by Yourself'

The Burlington Free Press publishes the keynote address by Mary Watzin, dean of the Rubenstein School, at the Green Mountain Environmental Leadership Awards presentation. She speaks of loving both the sense of discovery she feels as a scientist and the ability to apply knowledge to environmental problems, crediting "citizen scientists" with contributing vital information that helps researchers understand the world. Contact University Communications for information.

The Classics Speak to Modern Global Turmoil, According to UVM Prof

In advance of his public Dean's Lecture, professor and chair of classics Mark Usher talks with Seven Days about his personal experience and his scholarship linking events of the Arab Spring to Greek literature. Read the story at SevenDaysVT.com...

Fletcher Allen Studying New Technology that Enables Aortic Valve Replacement without Traditional Open Heart Surgery

Vermont Business magazine talks to Professor Harry Dauerman, M.D. about Fletcher Allen's participation in a clinical study that assesses a new, minimally invasive procedure for patients with aortic stenosis who are at high risk for open-heart surgery. Read the story at VermontBiz.com...

Hunger Games Producer, a UVM Alum, Hosts Benefit Screening

Jon Kilik '78, producer of the blockbuster movie The Hunger Games, discusses the film with the Burlington Free Press and Seven Days in advance of a benefit screening and talk at UVM. Read the story at BurlingtonFreePress.com... and a Q & A with Jon Kilik at SevenDaysVT.com...

My Turn: Innovative Approach to Investing in Vermont's Future

In an op-ed for the Burlington Free Press vice president for research and graduate studies Dominico Grasso weighs in on Gov. Shumlin's proposed $8 million investment in UVM and the state college system, noting the "unprecedented opportunities for positioning Vermont as a center for holistic technological creativity" that can create, attract and maintain high-quality jobs in the state, strengthening local businesses and communities. Contact University Communications for information.

Voice of the Free Press: Let's Give UVM a Big Hand

The Burlington Free Press recognizes the achievements -- as well as boosts to community spirit -- from UVM this spring, citing the ski team for its sixth national title, the first since 1994, the men's basketball team winning its first round in the NCAA championships "with a wide margin in a game of poise and discipline and "the goodwill and creative gesture" of leasing Centennial Field to the Lake Monsters for one dollar a year in an effort to keep minor league baseball in Burlington. Contact University Communications for information.

Q&A with Gov. Madeleine Kunin on 'The New Feminist Agenda'

In advance of her hosting a conference at UVM on women in the workplace, Vermont Digger has a conversation with former Vermont governor and UVM distinguished visiting scholar Madeleine Kunin about her most recent book, The New Feminist Agenda: Defining the Next Revolution for Women, Work, and Family. Read the story at VTDigger.org...

Can a Film Bridge Gaps in the Energy Debate?

Seven Days blogs about the newly designated Vermont Energy Independence Day, an idea from Jon Erickson, managing director of the Gund Institute for Ecological Economics, and his fellow producers at Bright Blue EcoMedia. According to the post, Erickson is working on a new film that will rely on amateur filmmakers to send in footage from around the state of Vermonters' grassroots efforts to transition to sustainable energy sources. Read the post at SevenDaysVT.com...

Waking Up from the American Dream

Daniel Krymkowski, professor of sociology, contributed this op-ed to the Times Argus, arguing that the inequality of opportunity in the U.S. -- with new census calculations indicating that nearly half of Americans are either poor or nearly poor -- makes a myth of the idea that individual merit can determine success in this country. Read the story at TimesArgus.com...

Body of Proof

Seven Days has a conversation with gross anatomy professor Jean Szilva, winner of many teaching awards for her innovative, sometimes unorthodox methods, about her work and her approach to helping students dissect human cadavers. Read the story at SevenDaysVT.com...

University of Vermont Center Offers Free Hearing Screenings

Dinah Smith, clinical associate professor in the Department of Communication Sciences and Disorders and an audiologist at UVM's Eleanor M. Luse Center, talks to the Burlington Free Press about the rise in hearing loss among youths (with one in ten Americans now having hearing loss) and how repeated exposure to loud noise can lead to permanent damage. Contact University Communications for information.

State Climatologist Makes Weather Clearer

Vermont Woman discusses the weather and a lot more with geography professor and state climatologist Lesley-Ann Dupigny-Giroux, particularly The Diversity Climate Network that she initiated to encourage girls and students of color to develop an interest in climate science as a career option. "I think at some point in your career," Dupigny-Giroux says, "you realize that you have to become a mentor, a model." Read the story at VermontWoman.com...

UVM Returns to the Track

The Burlington Free Press reports the repeated sound of starting pistols as UVM hosted its first track and field meet since 1997 with the opening of the new Frank H. Livak Track and Field Facility, funded through private donations. Contact University Communications for information.