Cultures of Asia, Middle East & Russia
  • ASIA:  Half the Human Race.  A Viewer’s Guide.  edited by Terry E. Lautz.  Learning Resources in International Studies, 1979.  Short, concise outlines of major Asian problems; the emergence of Japan, China after Mao, and the prospects of India.  Advanced students.
  • ASIA:  Teaching About Learning From.  by Seymour Fersh.  New York:  Teachers College Press, 1978.  Suggestions are made for differing curricula in elementary, junior high school, and senior high school grades, for activities; for improving perceptions of other cultures; and for evaluating students after a unit on Asian studies.
  • GLOBAL PERSPECTIVES THROUGH ASIAN EXPERIENCES.  Intercom #89, GPE* in cooperation with the Asia Society, Betty Bullard and Loretta Ryan, Guest Editors.  A wide range of activities, from working with maps to reading legends of India, helps students understand cultural similarities and differences.  
  • MAPPING ASIA.  SPICE Publications, 1994.  This activity book has been designed to serve two major purposes.  First, the unit teaches students about the basic physical and political geography of Asia.  Second, it introduces, or reviews, fundamental geographical concepts and vocabulary in an Asian context.  Contains five interactive lessons that include main geographical and political regions of Asia, a political map hunt, and physiographic features of Asia.  
  • SEASON TO TASTE:  A Southeast Asian Cookbook.  Vermont Refugee Resettlement Program, 1984. A cookbook with recipes from Southeast Asian women involved in the Vermont Refugee Resettlement Program.
  • THE EAST ASIAN RESOURCE AND EDUCATION PROGRAM AT YALE.  East Asian Resource and Education Program, Council on East Asian Studies, Yale University, New Haven, CT, 1993.  A catalogue of A.V. Materials, Resources, and Organizations.  Resources for all grade levels.
  • UNICEF IN THAILAND.  UNICEF*.  This set of slides and accompanying narration describes the health and hunger situation in Thailand.  Junior High, Adult.  


Bangledesh

  • NEEDLESS HUNGER:  Voices from a Bangladesh Village.  by Betsy Hartman and James Boyce.  England:  Third World Publications, Ltd., 1979.  The authors share their direct experience and lessons drawn from the villages of Bangladesh.
  • UNICEF SCHOOL SERIES NO. 1:  Shishir OF Bangladesh.  UNICEF   Includes 30 slides about a 15 year old boy, his school and family life, written commentary on each slide and teacher's notes with background information and maps.  Elementary.  Secondary.
Cambodia
  • IN MY HEART, I AM A DANCER: by Chamroeun Yin, photographs by Rene Marquez.  A program of the Asian Folk Arts Education Project, 1996.  Chamroeun Yin performs Cambodian court dance and teaches Cambodian dance and crafts; the book is a short autobiographical picture of Yin.
  • THE LAND AND PEOPLE OF CAMBODIA:  Portraits of the Nations Series.  By David P. Chandler.  Harper Collins Publishers, 1991.
China
  • ALL IN THE FAMILY:  China, Old and New.  by the Bay Area China Education Project, Stanford. Students investigate ideals underlying family relations in both traditional and modern China. Perceptive and analytical skills are used in creating stories to describe slides depicting family relationships. Grades 7-12.
  • ANCIENT CHINA.  Teacher Created Materials, 1999. Reprinted, 2000.  Designed for use with intermediate and middle school learners, this book contain a thematic unit on Ancient China with numerous reproducible activities and worksheets.  Interdisciplinary.
  • CHANGING IMAGES OF CHINA.  CTIR*, 1983.  These activities supplement regular text materials with primary sources, role plays, and case studies.  Topics included are historical perspectives, the relationships between China and the U.S., changes since Mao's death, the changing roles of women, and daily life in China in the 1980s.
  • CHINA AND THE WORLD IN 2010: An introduction to the futures studies offering china as a case study of the future because of its emerging international role, five reproducible lesson not only train students to use futurtists tools, but alos familiarize them with issues revelant to contemporary China.
  • CHINA MAP SET.  The Center for Teaching about China. This set of maps includes illustrations of the following topics, national minorities, geographic regions, provincial maps and physical maps.
  • CHINA ON THE WORLD STAGE:  Weighing the US Response.  Choices Education Project, Brown University, Box 1948, Providence, RI  02912.  Focuses attention on our country's evolving relationship with the emerging East Asian giant.  The unit ponders the global impact of China's economic growth, societal transformation , and increasing international involvement.  March 1995, 60 pages. 
  • CHINA SINCE 1949:  History in Depth.  by Simon Williams. Macmillan Education LTD, 1986. From the early years of communist rule, through the cultural revolution to today includes central history themes. Includes discussion questions.
  • CHINA:  A Teaching Workbook.  by Roberta Martion. East Asian Curriculum Project, 1983. Selection of resource listings, activities and units on Chinese geography, language, arts, traditional and modern history, culture, and U.S.-China relations.
  • CHINA:  An Historical Chronology.  San Francisco: China Books and Periodicals. This is an attractive time chart of Chinese history which records simultaneous historical developments in the west. Includes dynastic chart and a series of maps.
  • CHINA:  Another Way...A Family in Tachai.  London:  VCOAD, Parnell House.  Twelve slides and booklet focusing on commune-style life in China in the 1970s.
  • CHINA: From Emperors to Communes.  by Chris and Janie Filmstrip. Dillon Press, 1983. Amply illustrated text covers history arts, holidays, food, family, school life, recreation, China today, language, religion and the Chinese in the United States. Grades 5-7.
  • CHINESE CULTURAL RESOURCE BOOK FOR ELEMENTARY BILINGUAL TEACHERS.  by Irene Wok. 1976. This is a guide for upper elementary bilingual teachers. Written in Chinese and English, it includes 206 stories, songs, games, art projects, and recipes related to 5 major Chinese festivals.
  • CHINESE FESTIVALS.  by P'eng Yan Chi and Martin Palmer ICOREC. These four full color 14" by 19" posters depict the four major festivals, Ching Ming, Dragon Boat, New Year, and the Mid Autumn Moon.
  • CHINESE MANDARIN SOUND SYSTEM.  by the Center for Teaching about China. Beijing Review, Jan. 5, 1979. This is a six page handout of sounds, tones and romanizations used in Mandarin dialect. Includes the Chinese 'rebus'.
  • CHINESE WOMEN IN HISTORY AND LEGEND.  (Vols. 1 & 2) by Lu Yu. A.R.T.S. Inc. 1981. Grades 5-8. Chinese bilingual text with a line drawing relating stories of famous and influential women in Chinese history. Covers 700 BC. through the 20th century.
  • CURRICULUM REVIEW.  Chicago, IL:  Curriculum Advisory Service, Vol. 20, No. 4.  September, 1981.  A special feature on China studies, including reviews of classroom (K-12) activities, young adult reading, and teacher references.  Topics covered are:  traditional China, the Chinese Revolution, Mao-tse-tung, religion, and more.  A list of 50 Asian resource centers in the U.S. and Canada is also included.
  • DEMYSTIFYING THE CHINESE LANGUAGE.  CTIR*,  1983.  This unit provides a good introduction to Chinese pictographic/ideographic characters by having students decipher those characters in isolation and in a story context.  K-12.
  • EARLY CHINA AND THE WALL.  by Peter Nancarrow. Cambridge University Press, 1978. Relates early history of China Shang Dynasty (1600 BC.) through the Hanna Dynasty (220 BC.). Topics include geography, fortification, weapons, tools and metals used, dynastic history and daily life.
  • FAVORITE CHINESE STORIES.  by Leon Comber. Heinemann Educational Books, 1982. 
  • MORE FAVORITE CHINESE STORIES by Ho Man Yee, Heinemann Educational Books, 1979. These two books contain bilingual myths folktales and legends. Questions and exercises for added comprehension. Intermediate level.
  • FUN WITH CHINESE CHARACTERS.  Federal Publications, 1986.  Depiction of the development of the Chinese language through imaginative and humorous illustrations. Transition of Chinese characters from pictography to ideographs.
  • IMAGES OF CHINA.  by Gary R. Smith and George L. Otero, Jr., CTIR*, 1977.  A unit about finding out and checking out stereotypic images students may have about China and the Chinese.  Twenty-five activities listing objectives, materials, time and procedure are outlined.  Junior High.  High School.
  • LITTLE CARPS JUMP OVER DRAGON GATE.  by Jin Jin. Beijing: Foreign Languages Press, 1981. This is a story that depicts the adventures of the little carp as they go in search of the Dragon's gate.
  • LOOKING FOR AMERICA:  Chinese Images, (Part II).  produced by the China Council of the Asia Society.  London Records SPC 21185.  Contents:  52  color slides, 16 minute cassette tape.
  • LOOKING FOR CHINA:  American Images, (Part I).  produced by the China Council of the Asia Society.  Nonesuch Records H-72051.  Contents:  50 color slides, 18 minute cassette tape.
  • MAO TSE TUNG.  by Desmond Painter. Greenhaven Press, Inc. 1980. Grades 7©10. Describes and explains the policies developed under Chairman Mao Tse Tung. Includes land reform, industrial development social questions, health care, the cultural revolution and its effects on the Chinese society.
  • MEETING OTHER CULTURES:  China.  VHS Video Cassette, 1/2 inch format.
  • PERCEPTION/MISPERCEPTION:  China/USA.  New York:  Prentice-Hall Media, Inc.  Through five sound filmstrips and a text booklet, students explore the reasons behind stereotyping and distorted images of others.  They then apply their findings to Chinese and American perceptions of each other, from the earliest contacts to the 1970s.  Teacher's guide included.
  • QUESTIONS AND ANSWERS ABOUT CHINA'S NATIONAL MINORITIES.  by the National Minorities Questions Editorial Panel. Beijing; New World Press, 1985. Has extensive information about China's 55 national minorities, history, customs, language and about China's policies toward them.
  • SHAO NIAN GONG  A CHILDREN'S PALACE:  Ideas for Teaching About China.  by Michele Shoresman and Roberta Gumport. Center for Asian Studies, 1978. This resource contains units to supplement school text with chapters on artifacts, language, literature, geography, abacus, cooking, inventions, crafts, games and exercises. Units have goals, evaluation, vocabulary and references, reproduction pages and map transparencies.
  • THE FOOLISH MAN WHO MOVED MOUNTAINS.  by Marie Louise Gebhard and The Friendship Press, 1969. This anthology from China tells about the emperors and missionaries, farmers and revolutionaries, boys and girls and Chinese gods reflecting the long history of China and its people.
  • THE PEOPLE'S REPUBLIC OF CHINA:  A Basic Handbook.  by James C. Townsend. Learning Resources in International Studies.  Provides details about geography, history, government, trade and economic development, prices, wage scales, social organizations and life in China.
  • THE PEOPLE'S REPUBLIC OF CHINA:  A Basic Handbook.  The China Council of the Asia Society, 1984. Contains introduction, suggested reading as well as maps, tables, chronologies, and biographies of many aspects of life in China.
  • THE PEOPLE'S REPUBLIC OF CHINA:  A Comprehensive Teaching Unit for use in the Elementary Grades.  by Sally Ann Shear. The Center for Teaching about China, 1981. Contains instructional objectives, activities and resources for a 4- week unit with information on geography, history, health, care, sports, pandas, cooking, plays and stories, Chinese character writing and lesson plans. Grades 2-4.
  • THE RABBIT IN THE MOON:  Folktales from China and Japan.  Developed by the China and Japan Projects, 1979. A cross cultural investigation of eight Chinese and Japanese folktales designed to spur students interest in Japan.
  • THREE VIEW: Will the Real China Please Stand Up?  The Center for Teaching About China. Essential understanding of three interpretations of Chinese history. That of the People's Republic of China, traditional China, and the United States and China. Key events, role playing, family descriptions, with supplementary articles and exercises. Grades 9-12.
  • THROUGH CHINESE EYES:  Vol. I and II.  by Peter J. Seybolt (ed).   Praeger Publications, 1981.  Volume I examines China's recent past and traditional heritage. Volume II investigates changes in religion, government, medicine, industry, etc. taking place in Chinese institutions under Communist leaders.
  • VALUES AND RELIGION IN CHINA TODAY.  A Teaching Workbook and Lesson Series.  by Mary Lou Martin, M.M. and Donald MacInnis, Orbiz Books, 1985. This is designed to supplement current textbooks on China and Asian history and culture. A six week course of 30 lessons on modern China, secondary level.
  • WORLD STUDIES THEMES:  China.  London:  Inner London Educational Authority, 1974.  This packet contains information on Chinese social life, food, work, family life and village and town.  Books for teachers and sources of information are also suggested.  Junior High-Adult.


India

  • ANCIENT INDIA.  Teacher Created Materials, 1998.  Reprinted, 2000.  This book contains a comprehensive whole language, thematic unit with 80 reproducible pages.  It is designed for intermediate and middle school students.  
  • FAMILY IN BOMBAY:  Western India.  London:  VCOAD.  Twelve slides and booklet describing a variety of aspects of family life.
  • INDIA IN COLOR:  Activities and Projects.  by Claude Soleillant.  NY.:  Sterling, 1977.  A colorful book full of craft ideas from the traditions of India.  Included are step-by-step directions for making costumes, jewelry, food items, decorations, as well as games to play and stories to read or act out.  Grades 3-8.
  • INDIA:  An Intimate View.  by Brother Urban Naal, S.M. Stanford, CA:    Multi-Media Productions.  This program of one filmstrip, one cassette tape and a teacher's manual gives a better and more accurate view of India than they have already.  The geography and history of India, homes, occupations, religion, transportation and problems in India are covered.  Middle School.  High School.
  • INDIA:  by Leslie Semaan and Kathleen Lightman. Videa, 1984. This text has been developed in order to help students appreciate India as a rich culture with an important heritage. It illustrates some of the changes and challenges which India faces in order to meet the needs of its people.
  • INDIAN WOMEN.  Educational Resource Center, New Delhi, 1977.  Photos and profiles of contemporary women of India.  An introductory essay is also included.
  • THE JEANS GENERATION:  Urban Indian Teenagers.  by  Elizabeth A. Byrne.   New Delhi, India: Aruna Printing Press, 1978.  A collection of visual aids and readings that examine the lives of Indian teenagers.
  • THROUGH INDIAN EYES, Vol. I and II.  by Donald and Jean Johnson (ed).  NY.:  The Center for International Training and Education, 1981.
  • UNICEF SCHOOL SERIES NO. 2: Young in India.  UNICEF   Includes 27 slides about a 13 year old girl and her village in the South Union State of Tamil Nadu, written commentary on each slide, and teacher's notes with background information and maps.  Elementary.  Secondary.  Adult.Volume I contains selections portraying traditional Indian life. Volume II discusses problems in Indian as viewed by the Indians themselves. Subjects include national language, overpopulation education, and the British heritage in India.
  • WOMEN IN INDIA.  by Susan H. Gross & Marjorie W. Bingham.  Wisconsin:  GEM Publications, 1980.  Shows the role of women in Indian society through primary source materials.  Teacher's guide included.


Japan

  • ANCIENT JAPAN.  Teacher Created Materials, 1999.  Reprinted, 2001.  Designed for Intermediate and Middle school learners, this interdisciplinary thematic unit has many reproducible activities and lessons pertaining to Ancient Japan. 
  • BAREFOOT GEN, Vol. II.  by Keiji Nehazawa.  Tokyo:  Project Gen, 1979.  A cartoon depiction of life after the dropping of atomic bombs on Japan as seen through the eyes of a young boy.
  • DAILY LIFE AND WORK IN JAPAN TODAY.  International Society for Educational Information Inc. These slides depict the life of the Japanese as it is today. A description of each of these slides is included in the kit.
  • EAST MEETS WEST:  Mutual Images.  produced by Teaching Japan in Schools with the East Asian Resource Center, Univ. of Wash. (Seattle), 1979.  This unit deals with Western perceptions of the East through an historical examination of early East-West contact, a student perceptions analysis and a study of how perceptions are derived.  Also included are suggestions for changing misperceptions.
  • FREE RESOURCES FOR TEACHING ABOUT JAPAN.  by Linda S. Wajtan. Indiana University, 1987. Gives the who where and what on information and materials about Japan.JAPAN.  Oklahoma State Department of Education, 1983. This guide is dedicated to promoting global awareness, focuses upon Japan, our global neighbor, friend and ally. It contains many fun and interesting activities for students to do.
  • HIROSHIMA ON THE BEACH:  Reproducible Curriculum Unit.  The Center for Learning, 1992.  Two self-contained study guides designed to be used either together or separately.  This curriculum unit offers background about the works and their authors, John Hersey and Nevil Shute; creative exercises; and engaging activities to help students place the works in their postwar and Cold War historical contexts, recognize the main themes, and understand the implications of the books in society today.  Written by a teacher, the curriculum unit includes objectives, notes, detailed procedures, handouts, tests, projects, and essay topics.  Grades 7-12.
  • JAPAN IN THE CLASSROOM.  by Jacquelin Johnson and Lynn S. Parisi. Boulder; 1987. This resource contains both activities and displays that provide fresh approaches to topics such as cross cultural perceptions, family and society, language and literature, economics and geography of Japan.
  • JAPAN IN THE CLASSROOM:  Elementary and Secondary Activities. Social Science Education Consortium.  Introducing students to Japanese culture and history, these 26 lessons cover such topics as homes and food, design, folk art, poetry and proverbs, population density, economic development, and government.  Cross-cultural comparisons between Japan and the United States are emphasized.  Five of the activities are geared for grades 9 - 12,  four for grades 7 - 12, four for grades 6 and up, eleven for grades 4 and up, and two for primary.  Loose-leaf book of lessons includes objectives and step-by-step directions. Illustrated. 8 1/2" x 11".
  • JAPAN MEETS THE WEST:  A Case Study in Perception.  CTIR*, 1983. This unit includes a slide show of Japanese artists' impressions of Westerners from the 16th through 19th century, primary source readings regarding Westerners' impressions of the Japanese, and activities that examine contemporary mutual images held by the Japanese and the Americans.  Grades 6-12.
  • JAPAN RESOURCE CATALOGUE:  A Guide for New England Educators.  Five College Center for East Asian Studies, Amherst, MA. Serves as a listing of sources on music, history, foreign relations, films and books about Japan.
  • JAPAN TRANSPARENCIES:  NY  AEVAC Educational Publishers, 1969.  A group of transparencies which illustrate the geography, history, anthropology, sociology, economics and political system of Japan.
  • JAPAN:  Asia’s Economic Superpower.  Ridgefield, Conn.:  Current Affairs, 1980.  Japan, while poorly endowed in natural resources, has by diligence and dedication become an economic super-power.  But Japan is vulnerable:  it has severe inflationary and environmental problems and must import almost all the oil it needs.  Color Sound Filmstrip.  Secondary.
  • OPENING DOORS:  Contemporary Japan.  The Asia Society Inc., 1979. These materials are an attempt to contribute to the framework that will enable students to realize the necessity for and experience the growth of acquiring a world view.
  • TANOSHII GAKUSHU, (Learning with Enjoyment).  University of Illinois:  Center for Asian Studies, 1975.  Book containing a wealth of creative ideas and activities for learning about Japan in the elementary school.
  • TEACHING JAPAN IN THE SCHOOL:  Overview of Programs and Materials.  Stanford Univ., CA:  Teaching Japan in the Schools (TJS), 1981.  An annotated bibliography of materials available for teaching.  
  • THE JAPAN DATABASE.  by Fred Czarra. Washington: Council of Chief State School Officers, 1986. This projects goal is to increase global awareness in the schools, and the information in this guide is to assist educators who wish to learn about Japan.
  • THE RABBIT IN THE MOON:  Folktales from China and Japan.  Developed by the China and Japan Projects, 1979. A cross cultural investigation of eight Chinese and Japanese folktales designed to spur students interest in Japan.
  • THROUGH JAPANESE EYES, Vol. I and II.  by Richard H. Minear (ed).  New York:  The Center for International Training and Education, 1981.  Primary sources reveal Japanese history from early Japan to Post World War II.
  • VIDEO LETTERS FROM JAPAN.  The Asia Society, 1983.  Eight videotapes covering many aspects of Japanese culture and history through the eyes of young Japanese.  Titles include:  "My Town," "Tokyo Sunday," and "Nobles and Samurai:  Japan Before Perry."  Available on Beta & VHS, Teacher's guides and other materials included.
  • WOMEN IN JAPAN:  From Ancient Times to the Present.  Margorie Wall Bingham and Susan Hill Gross. Women in World Area Studies, 1987. This is the histories of women overview, challenging stereotypes and presenting the rich history of women in Japanese culture. Includes roles in law, religion, family, and politics.


MIDDLE EAST

  • 1977.  Points out the internal problems of Israel, the problems of the refugees, and the scope of the Arab-Israeli conflict. Filmstrip, cassette and discussion guide. Intermediate. Secondary.
  • A MEDIEVAL BANQUET IN THE ALHAMBRA PALACE.  By:Audrey Shabbas, editor, AWAIR, 1994.  Teaching across the curriculum is exactly what this set of materials intends.  A culminating activity for the study of Islam and the Middle Ages, this is a “how to” that involves not only the social studies, language arts, math, science and art departments - but the entire school - in putting on a medieval banquet and setting it in Arab Spain.  Excite students with clothing, architecture, food, music, stories, games, and role-playing, while having them explore Arab-Islamic civilization at its height.  Students will learn of the interconnectedness of Arab Spain in the early Middle Ages with the rest of Europe and with the world to the ease and south - the Abbasid and Umayyad courts of Badhdad and Damascus and the African kingdoms of Ghana, Mali and Songhai.  Role-playing is only one aspect that marks this work serious intellectual content.  Suggestion of 26 guests include:  Ibn Rushd (Averroes), St. Thomas Aquinas, Holy Roman Emperor Frederick II, Ibn Maimum (Mainmonides), Eleanor of Aquitaine, queens Zubeida of Baghdad, Amina of Zaria, and Arwa of Yemen.
  • AFSC MIDDLE EAST NEWS PACKET:  The West Bank.  AFSC*, 1978.  Maps, news articles, and testimony concerning Israeli settlements on the West Bank, and the possibility for the establishment of a Palestinian state there.
  • ISLAM FOR BEGINNERS.  By N.I. Mattar, illustrated by H.N. Haddad, Writers & Reader, 1992.  What an absolutely wonderful little book!  From Writers & Readers who always make what we think are complex issues, understandable - and fun - and do it visually!  There is much here for use as overhead transparencies - allowing students to focus visually while you might present a full period's lecture around what is depicted graphically.  Don’t let its “for beginners” fool you, there is much depth and perception herein.  Haddad’s black and white graphics are delightful.  This is obviously a labor of love.  5th - 12th, social studies/humanities.  196 pp.  $9.95.


ISRAEL

  • ISRAEL:  A Stuggle for Survival.  Wilton,CONN: Current Affairs.
  • ISRAEL:  The People of the Promised Land.  Ridgefield, Conn.:  Current Affairs, 1980.  Since 1948, Israel has been living in a state of siege.  Threats from abroad has helped weld people of diverse backgrounds into a nation.  Now the difference in outlook, lifestyles and customs European- born Zionists, native sabras, and Asiatic Jews are beginning to surface.  Color Sound Filmstrip.  Filmstrip, cassette, and discussion guide.  Secondary.
OTHER
  • MEDIA BRIEFING PACKET:  The Middle East.  by  Sheila Scoville.   Near Eastern Center, Univ. of Arizona, Tucson, 1980.  A guide to the governments, history facts and figures on the Middle Eastern countries.
  • MEETING OTHER CULTURES:  Afghanistan.  VHS Video Cassette, 1/2 inch format
  • THE ARABS:  Activities for the Elementary School Level.  By Audrey Shabbas, Carol El-Shaieb and Ahlam Nabulsi, AWAIR, 1991.  Here are the things that make for peace - activities that put a human face on the peoples of the Arab World.  At the same time, students, through these 25 hands-on projects, can develop new skills and understanding as they cook, weave, macram?, sing, dance, recycle, make soap, play games (board games and field games), tell stories and much more.  Empowering children to value themselves and others in the aim of this work which was developed in direct response to requests for such materials from materials from elementary peace educators.  We’re told it’s mis-named, that these activities are also perfect for junior high use.  We said, “We know, that’s where they were originally developed!”  K-7th, across curriculum, 60 pp. spiral bound.  
  • THE MIDDLE EAST:  Including the Nations of North Africa.  By James I. Clark.  McDougal,  Littell and Company, 1989.  The first section includes chapters on the ancient world, the Byzantine Empire, Islam. 20th century nationalism, and the conflict between Israel and the Arab world.  The second section covers such major aspects of modern life as women in the Muslim world, governments and their problems, and the politics of oil. Secondary.
  • THE MIDDLE EAST:  Including the Nations of North America.  By James I. Clark.  McDougal,  Littell and Company, 1989.  The first section includes chapters on the ancient world, the Byzantine Empire, Islam. 20th century nationalism, and the conflict between Israel and the Arab world.  The second section covers such major aspects of modern life as women in the Muslim world, governments and their problems, and the politics of oil. Secondary.
  • THE MIDDLE EAST:  Teacher’s Manual.  By James M. Edwards.  McDougal, Littell and  Company, 1989.  This manual can be used with MIDDLE EAST:INCLUDING THE NATIONS OF NORTH AFRICA.
  • THE MIDDLE EAST:  Understanding the News.  By David C. King.  Richard J. LeBrasseur, 1989.  
  • UNDERSTANDING ARABS: A GUIDE FOR WESTERNERS by Margaret K. (Omar) Nydell.  Published by Intercultural Press, Yarmouth, Maine.  In this book....ÓDr. Nydell provides an objective examination of Arab values, beliefs and perceptions and compares and contrasts them with those of Westerners.  She highlights the dynamic patterns of change that have influenced the Arab World in recent times and offers illuminating insights into the minds and hearts of Arabs, while avoiding the political quicksands that lay in the path of Arab-Western relationships.


RUSSIA (and USSR)

  • CHARTING RUSSIA’S FUTURE IN THE POST-SOVIET ERA.  Choices Education Project, Brown University, Box 1948, Providence, RI  02912.  Engages students in the soul-searching redefinition of Russia's identity by asking them to view issues through Russian eyes.  Revised August 1994, 59 pages, one-week, $10.00.
  • FACTS ABOUT THE SOVIET UNION.  This is a folder containing bibliography of Soviet films. Literature and facts as well as project ideas and discussion questions.
  • GETTING ACQUAINTED: Thinking About the Soviet Union.  Educators for Social Responsibility. This elementary unit includes an overview for teachers with recommended resource list with address and prices. Has a unit on gathering information and exploring activities, history, holidays, language, maps and the alphabet.
  • PEACE PORRIDGE TWO:  Russia to Begin With.  by Teddy Milne. Northhampton: Pittenbruach Press, 1987. This resource depicts children as peace givers, groups who promote peace, a section on instant Russian, penpals and resources.
  • RUSSIA IN REVOLUTION:  History Broadsheets.  England:  Heinemann Educational Books, Ltd.  A kit containing 24 2-4 page broadsheets on the Russian Revolution.  Included are charts, maps, and suggested questions.
  • RUSSIA/SOVIET UNION:  A Guide to Print Materials for Teachers.  by Elizabeth Talbot and James Vallant, July 1985. Contains art, literature, history, social studies topics as well as maps, and related references are reviewed for teachers. A list of distributors of Soviet materials as well as further information on Russia.
  • RUSSIA’S UNCERTAIN TRANSITION:  Challenges for U.S. Policy.  Choices Education Project, Brown University, Box 1948, Providence, RI  02912.  Puts students in a position to consider our countryÕs relationship with Russia and itÕs neighbors.  The unit surveys the economic problems, political turmoil, and ethnic conflicts that have shaped the outlook of policy makers in the Kremlin.  September 1994, 71 pages.
  • TEACHING SOVIET STUDIES:  History, Language, Culture, and Art.  By Patricia Winpenny, Louise Cadwell, Katherine Weeks Cadwell.  Center for Teaching International Relations, 1991.  Committed to the development of global perspectives through the use of social studies and art, this unique activity book introduces students to the geographical, demographical, and cultural diversity of the land known until 1992 as the Soviet Union.  Thought-provoking classroom exercises promote cross-cultural awareness as students are familiarized with comparative geography of the United States and the Soviet Union, the Russian language and music, children's lifestyles, and arts and crafts.  Suggested teaching activities include an introduction, objectives, suggested grade levels, time frames, materials, procedures, follow-up, and reproducible student handouts.  Includes a set of twenty lessons.  Grades 6-9.
  • THE SOVIET UNION AND HER PEOPLE.  Wilton, CT:  Current Affairs, 1980.  Ukrainians, Georgians, Armenians, Balts and others continue to press Moscow for greater autonomy.  Although separatist movements have been swiftly suppressed, the dominance of "Great Russians" is under continuing challenge.  Color Sound Filmstrip.  Secondary.
  • THE SOVIET UNION:  A Communist Society in Transition.  Wilton, CT:  Current Affairs, 1974.  The filmstrip offers a fresh insight into the validity of Communist dogma and gauges the prospects for genuine U.S.- Soviet d?tente.  A look is also taken at the growing nationalism of the Soviet Union's many minorities.  Color Sound Filmstrip.  Secondary.
  • WOMEN IN THE U.S.S.R.  by Susan H. Gross & Marjorie W. Bingham.  Wisconsin:  Gary McCuen Publications, 1980.  Women throughout the history of the U.S.S.R. are examined.  Teacher's guide is included.