This is an ancient page, so I've disconnected most of the links - 7 March 2002. Hope Greenberg.

EDSS 295: Professional Development for Graduate Students

Creating Your Web Portfolio



Portfolio is one of those wonderful words that has been and continues to be redefined. There are many visions of what a Web portfolio can contain. Some see it as a place to put your resume. Others create "fun" pages that tell something about themselves an d perhaps contain links to sites on the Web they find interesting. Others see the Web as a place to develop projects, either hypermedia or linear, for a particular topic or for a specific class.

 There are many examples on the Web. Here are a few that suggest different viewpoints for what a Web portfolio can be.

 A personal (?) portfolio: http://www.rpi.edu/~decemj/index.html

 See what UVMers are doing at: http://www.uvm.edu/~maustin/moose.html(These are in random order and some are simple experimental first attempts.)

 The Global Schoolhouse has tried to provide guidelines for what student Web pages should be. While these guidelines are directed at K-12 education, they have some useful suggestions for any Web-based project. But do they succeed in following their own gui delines?: http://www.gsn.org/web/tutorial/main.htm

 Student Projects at Hamline University: http://www.hamline.edu/~rsmyth/projects.html

 My own ideas? I see a Web portfolio as being more than a resume, more than a place to design projects, more than a place to collect papers and bibliographies. A Web portfolio can be all these things as well as a private storehouse of work that is not conn ected or published to the rest of the Web at all. In other words, a Web portfolio can be a growing, expanding body of your life and your life's work. My own sample? Hope Hall for the Humanities
 
 

The task at hand

The last three sections of this class will provide an introduction to the basic tools and processes needed to begin your own Web portfolio creation. These are the basic instructions. The creative implementation of these instructions is left to you!
 
 

"It is always best to begin at the beginning..."