Join us at the Fleming Museum for our series of afternoon and evening programs. Each program is related to an exhibition or an object from the permanent collection currently on view. Programs are included with regular admission, unless noted otherwise.



JANUARY 2016


THURSDAY, JANUARY 28 - 6:00 PM

UVM FILM SERIES: Alphaville

1965, Jean-Luc Godard

One of Godard’s great cinematic mash-ups, this ode to film noir is also a science fiction fantasy. Alphaville follows hardboiled tough guy Lemmy Caution (Eddie Constantine) as he embarks on a number of missions on an alien planet and battles against the sentient computer controlling a civilization that’s at once not of this earth and also eerily familiar.

Single ticket-$10; Pass for all four films-$30. This screening takes place in the Frank Livak Room in the Davis Center.





FEBRUARY 2016


WEDNESDAY, FEBRUARY 10 - 12:00 PM

TALK: Visual Culture & Gay Identities in the 20th and 21st Centuries

Paul Deslandes, Associate Professor and Chair, UVM Department of History

Focusing on Great Britain and the United States, this illustrated talk focuses on the relationship between gay male identities and visual culture in the 20th and 21st centuries. The talk shows how an appreciation of the male body and male form acquired political significance as men on both sides of the Atlantic used their ability to produce, view, and consume images of men in physique photography, advertising, and pornography to forge modern sexual identities in the years between 1890 and 2015.



WEDNESDAY, FEBRUARY 10 - 5:30 - 7:00 PM

Spring 2016 Opening Reception

Hosted by UVM President Thomas Sullivan, Fleming Director Janie Cohen and the Fleming Museum's Board of Advisors

Cash bar, hors d'oeuvres, and music



THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 18 - 6:00 PM

UVM FILM SERIES: The Handmaid’s Tale

1990, Volker Schlöndorff

The big-screen adaptation of Margaret Atwood’s influential novel The Handmaid’s Tale imagines a democratic society whose response to terrorism is to suspend civil liberties and legislate the official subservience of women. Narrated by Offred, the “handmaid,” or concubine, to a leading government official, The Handmaid’s Tale raises tough questions about sexual politics, slavery, and gender relations in a world not that far removed from our own.

Single ticket-$10; Pass for all four films-$30. This screening takes place in the Frank Livak Room in the Davis Center.



WEDNESDAY, FEBRUARY 24 - 6:00 PM

The Painted Word Poetry Series

with Alison Prine

Alison Prine’s poems have appeared or are forthcoming in The Virginia Quarterly Review, Shenandoah, Harvard Review, Michigan Quarterly Review, and Prairie Schooner among others. Her first collection of poems, Steel, was chosen by Jeffrey Harrison for this year’s Cider Press Review Book Award and will be published in January 2016. Prine lives in Burlington, Vermont, where she works as a psychotherapist.
The Painted Word poetry series is presented under the direction of Major Jackson, the Richard Dennis Green and Gold Professor in UVM's Department of English, and highlights established and emerging poets.

Co-sponsored by the UVM Department of English with support from the James and Mary Brigham Buckham Scholarship Fund.



SUNDAY, FEBRUARY 28 - 2:00 PM

FILM: Samuel Bak: Painter of Questions

For over 70 years, from his first paintings as a child prodigy in the Vilna Ghetto, Samuel Bak has produced a remarkable body of work that has earned him an international reputation as a painter of thought-provoking images that raise challenging questions about essential life issues. This film follows Bak as he returns to his hometown of Vilna, Lithuania, for the first time since occupying the Ghetto as a young child during the Holocaust. (48 min.)





MARCH 2016


WEDNESDAY, MARCH 2 - 12:00 PM

TALK: Spotlight on the Collection

with Andrea Rosen, Curator, Fleming Museum of Art

The Fleming Museum’s new Curator, Andrea Rosen, discusses the process of uncovering little-seen aspects of the permanent collection through her explorations of the Museum’s collections storage, and highlights the opportunity for open-ended discovery by engaging with unique art objects.



THURSDAY, MARCH 10 - 7:00 PM

PechaKucha, Burlington: Volume 19

PechaKucha Night (PKN) is a worldwide phenomenon that offers the opportunity for a broad range of partcipants to present their projects, ideas, thoughts, and designs at a fun and informal gathering. This volume is hosted by ECHO and takes place in their auditorium.



THURSDAY, MARCH 17 - 6:00 PM

UVM FILM SERIES: The Trial

1962, Orson Welles

Shot on the fly and on the cheap in the rubble-strewn streets and abandoned buildings of post-World War II Europe, The Trial perfectly captures the spirit of a world in limbo. Anthony Perkins takes on the role of Josef K, the young man who’s told that he’s on trial—but for what and by whom, he’s never quite sure. The Trial is perhaps the greatest screen adaptation of writer Franz Kafka’s work.

Single ticket-$10; Pass for all four films-$30. This screening takes place in the Frank Livak Room in the Davis Center.



SUNDAY, MARCH 20 - 2:00 PM

FILM: Samuel Bak: The Art of Speaking about the Unspeakable

This film explores the life experiences that have shaped Samuel Bak’s art through a candid and insightful conversation with the artist, selected recollections from his recently published memoir, and a moving presentation of many of his most important works. (37 min.)



WEDNESDAY, MARCH 23 - 6:00 PM

TALK: Painting, Print, Poster, Album Cover: Pop Reproductions and the Counter-Culture

with Thomas Crow, Rosalie Solow Professor of Modern Art, Institute of Fine Arts, New York University

The emergence of Pop painting in the early 1960s brought to the fore mass-produced brand logos and images. It logically followed that Pop subjects would lend themselves to fine-art multiple editions, but there proved to be no containing the proliferation of reproducible motifs.  Talented designers linked to the counter-culture took over the innovations of Pop in order to surpass the fine-art version, both in invention and in attracting vastly larger audiences for sophisticated visual experiences.

With support from the UVM Department of Art and Art History.





APRIL 2016


SUNDAY, APRIL 3 - 2:00 PM

MUSIC PERFORMANCE: . . . what they’ve been saying about SEX!” Texts and Music from Middle Ages to Modern

with The University Catamount Singers and Director David Neiweem, UVM Professor of Music

Enjoy a choral program of music based on what people through the ages have been saying about sex. Flirtatious and suggestive songs about sex and morality, ribald tunes and seductive melodies create a musically varied program featuring works from the 8th to the 21st century. Co-sponsored by the UVM Department of Music and Dance.
Free admission



WEDNESDAY, APRIL 6 - 6:00 PM

TALK: Holocaust Survivor as Master Artist: Samuel Bak’s Images of the Past and Present

with Jeffry Diefendorf, Professor, University of New Hampshire Department of History

Samuel Bak’s paintings deal with memories of the Holocaust and his reflections on its impact on Jewish and European culture. In this talk, Diefendorf discusses Bak’s childhood in wartime Vilna and his experiences and career after the war. As a survivor, Bak continues to produce images that focus on present-day matters, exploring such themes as whether we can continue to hope for the future.
Co-sponsored by The Carolyn and Leonard Miller Center for Holocaust Studies at UVM.



THURSDAY, APRIL 14 - 6:00 PM

UVM FILM SERIES: Looper

2012, Rian Johnson

What would a government do if someone invented time travel? Make it illegal, of course! Toward the end of the 21st century, the mob makes use of banned time travel technology to take care of problems and dispose of bodies in the past. Joseph Gordon Leavitt plays one of the mob’s “loopers,” a hit-man responsible for executing people when they’re sent back in time—until he discovers that one of his victims is his future self (Bruce Willis). With tremendous action sequences and thorny time-travel paradoxes, Looper is both great fun and a thoughtful examination of how time changes identity.

Single ticket-$10; Pass for all four films-$30. This screening takes place in the Frank Livak Room in the Davis Center.



SUNDAY, APRIL 17 - 2:00 PM

FILM: Samuel Bak: Painter of Questions

For over 70 years, from his first paintings as a child prodigy in the Vilna Ghetto, Samuel Bak has produced a remarkable body of work that has earned him an international reputation as a painter of thought-provoking images that raise challenging questions about essential life issues. This film follows Bak as he returns to his hometown of Vilna, Lithuania, for the first time since occupying the Ghetto as a young child during the Holocaust. (48 min.)



THURSDAY, APRIL 21 - 5:30 - 7:00 PM

OLLI PROGRAM: Whaam! Pop Art from the 1960s

Pop Art took the 1960s world by storm with its bold images, use of commercial methods like silkscreen, and often ironic take on American culture. Artists such as Roy Lichtenstein, Robert Indiana, Jasper Johns, Claes Oldenburg, and Robert Rauschenberg drew inspiration from everyday objects, advertisements, and mass media during a time of experimentation and great social change. Join Christina Fearon, the Fleming’s curator of education, for a revealing look at the artists and their influences in the special exhibition Pop Art Prints. We’ll also take a sneak peek at seldom-seen Pop works, such as Andy Warhol’s Polaroid portrait shots, brought out from Fleming storage for this program.

This program is a collaboration between the Fleming Museum of Art and the Osher Lifelong Learning Institute (OLLI). To register, contact OLLI:



WEDNESDAY, APRIL 27 - 6:00 PM

The Painted Word Poetry Series

Ekphrastic Poetry Reading

We conclude another season of The Painted Word with a final program of verse written in response to works of visual art. The ancient Greeks taught ekphrasis as a way to share the emotional experience and content of an object through detailed descriptive writing. In later centuries, ekphrasis was used to create vivid descriptions of works of art. This spring, students and community members are invited to write original poems describing or inspired by the wide range of visual art on view in the Museum’s galleries.

Writers of selected poems will be invited to read at The Painted Word on April 27, and a collection of submitted poems will be printed in a booklet available at the Museum.

Co-sponsored by the UVM Department of English with support from the James and Mary Brigham Buckham Scholarship Fund.

Submissions must be received by March 16. Click here for more information and to submit.




MAY 2016


WEDNESDAY, MAY 4 - 6:00 PM

Lost Shul Mural

with Aaron Goldberg and Jeffrey Potash, Co-Directors of the Lost Shul Mural Project

This special program at Ohavi Zedek Synagogue is an opportunity to see the Lost Shul mural, a synagogue mural from 1910 painted by Lithuanian immigrant artist Ben Zion Black for the Chai Adam congregation in Burlington. Recent restoration has revealed the bright colors and details of the original design, one of the only surviving examples of a once ubiquitous folk art decorating Eastern European painted wooden synagogues. Discover the story behind this rare mural and the effort to preserve an important part of Burlington’s Jewish history.

This is a Fleming members-only event for those at the Contributing Level and above.




THURSDAY, MAY 12 - 6:00 PM

PechaKucha, Burlington: Volume 20

PechaKucha Night (PKN) is a worldwide phenomenon that offers the opportunity for a broad range of partcipants to present their projects, ideas, thoughts, and designs at a fun and informal gathering. This volume is hosted by the Fleming and takes place in the Marble Court.



SUNDAY, MAY 15 - 2:00 PM

FILM: Samuel Bak: The Art of Speaking about the Unspeakable

This film explores the life experiences that have shaped Samuel Bak’s art through a candid and insightful conversation with the artist, selected recollections from his recently published memoir, and a moving presentation of many of his most important works. (37 min.)