2011 EDBC Programs

SKIN DEEP: A CONVERSATION ABOUT RACISM

Amanda Flores & Sherwood Smith

Chittenden Bank Room

Through a facilitated discussion, we hope to address issues of race and racism by exploring clips from the film “Skin Deep”. Students will reflect on the film and engage in conversation about issues about power, privilege, and identity.

BULLIED: A STUDENT, A SCHOOL, AND A CASE THAT MADE HISTORY

Christina Olstad & Dorothea Brauer

Sugar Maple Ballroom

"Bullied: A Student, a School and a Cast that Made History” shares an inspiring story of a young gay man who took a stand against the bullying he experienced in school. Participants will walk away with an understanding of how bullying shows up on campus at UVM and will discuss ways to engage rather than be a bystander.

CRUEL INTENTIONS: (UN)INTENTIONALITY & (UN)SAFE SPACES

Molly Campbell & Gretchenrae Callanta

Williams Family Room

This workshop will use various forms of media to challenge participant in expanding their understanding of “intent vs. impact” in the context of real life, triggering experiences. Taking it to the next level, participants will take a critical look at the role of intentionality in creating safe spaces in Higher Education.

 

Stereotype Threats and Micro-aggressions

Dorothea Brauer

Jost Foundation Room

The presenter will invite participants to share actively in exploring the meaning of the terms and concepts, “stereotype threat” and “micro-aggression”. The workshop format will be informal conversation, with the presenter, Dot Brauer, providing explanations of the concepts, and facilitation conversation among participants about how these concepts relate to issues of bias and discrimination, and what clues our community can gain from these concepts to help us understand how to create community environments free of bias and discrimination.

 


Speak Up! Tools on How to Address Everyday Bias – Part I

Llu Mulvaney-Stanak, Dustin Evatt, & Mae Stephenson

Sugar Maple Ballroom

This session will assist student leaders in recognizing the roots/sources of everyday bias and developing their personal toolbox with strategies of how to address bias incidents that they observe or are involved in. This session will directly connect the often lofty ideas of social justice and leadership to tangible skills that leaders can use in their everyday lives. Addressing bias cam be challenging and we hope to address this by examining barriers to responding to bias, review UVM’s bias incident protocols, and inspiring leaders to act compassionately through understanding the impact of bias on individuals, groups, and organizations.

 

QUEER PEOPLE OF COLOR (QPOC) PERSPECTIVES ON IDENTITY

Sydnee Viray, Candace Taylor, Vay Van, & Patrick Hale

Williams Family Room

The voices of QPOC are often marginalized or left out of common narratives in communities of color and LGBT communities. The result is the persistence and perpetuation of damaging stereotypes, myths and misrepresentations of queer identified people. Rather than continue that perpetuation this workshop seeks to highlight and display the levels of complexity, innovation and creativity that is fundamental to the QPOC experience.

 

Creating a Bias Response Team at UVM

The UVM Anti-Bias Task Force

Jost Foundation Room

If you want to learn more about one way UVM can improve the way we respond to bias, come to this session and learn about the way Bias Response Teams (BRT) are already working on other campuses and how we can establish a BRT at UVM.

 

Speak Up! Tools on How to Address Everyday Bias – Part II

Llu Mulvaney-Stanak, Dustin Evatt, & Mae Stephenson

Sugar Maple Ballroom

This session will assist student leaders in recognizing the roots/sources of everyday bias and developing their personal toolbox with strategies of how to address bias incidents that they observe or are involved in. This session will directly connect the often lofty ideas of social justice and leadership to tangible skills that leaders can use in their everyday lives. Addressing bias cam be challenging and we hope to address this by examining barriers to responding to bias, review UVM’s bias incident protocols, and inspiring leaders to act compassionately through understanding the impact of bias on individuals, groups, and organizations.

 

SPEAKING OUT: A THEATRE WORKSHOP ON ADDRESSING DISCRIMINATION AND BIAS IN EVERYDAY LIFE

Katelyn Sadler & Viraj Patel

Jost Foundation Room

This session draws heavily upon Augusto Boal’s Theatre of the Oppressed to develop methods and strategies for addressing instances of discrimination and bias that occur in our daily lives at UVM. in A highly interactive workshop, participants will draw upon their own experiences in which they have been triggered, aggressed, and/or had trouble speaking up and then engage in group dialogue through theatrical expression in order to leave with a greater sense of confidence in confronting and making meaning of such situations in the future.


 
Building a Community of Learners: “From Exclusion to Inclusion”

Grechenrae Callanta & Gilbert Rivera

Sugar Maple Ballroom

As much as students carry bias, professors carry bias too. Professor bias is something that isn’t talked about often, because the teacher is seen as the one with the knowledge, the one who is more experience. However, professors are the one that filter what, when and how they teach and how they run a classroom. That is grounded in the assumption that professor knows best what to teach in the class. This approach creates a hierarchy of oppression in the class room rather than a community of learns that include everyone. This session aims to raise awareness of the issue and provide ways for students to acknowledge that they have voices in the classroom too. We welcome both professors and students, in hopes to begin a dialogue and bridge communities.

 

TELL ME A STORY ABOUT RACE

ALANA Student Center Staff

Unity Lounge (3rd Floor)

10:15 AM – 12:30 PM & 1:45 PM – 4:00 PM

Based on the independent, non-profit project, “Story Corps”, we seek to enable participants to tell stories about their experience with racial realities in the US. Story telling has the power to educated, validate and potentially liberate both speaker and listener. Participants will come and have up to 20 minutes to record a story to a friend they bring with them or a trained staff member.


 


SOUL COLLAGE

Handy Family Room

Ongoing throughout the day

This program gives participants the opportunity to express what they are feeling through an artistic lens. Adapted from Seena Frost’s original concept, participants are invited to come create their own Soul Collage. While the original project has participants create their own deck of cards that represent the complexity of themselves, participants today can create a collage through what every medium they prefer. Please visit www.soulcollage.com for more information about the original project.

INDIVIDUAL DIFFERENCE: PERSONAL RESPONSIBILITY

& THE FIGHT AGAINST HATE

Thomas B. Howard, Jr.

Livak Ballroom

1:45 PM – 4:00 PM

The FBI estimates that more than 7,000 hate crimes occur in the US each year. Whether we hear about them in the news or read them in the paper, they become external. Many of us do not acknowledge or understand the role hate plays in our everyday lives, consider how we contribute to the problem, or what we can do to change it. This program will lead participants on an interactive journey to explore how each of us contribute to the role hate plays in the world, and what we can do everyday of our lives to make our communities safer for everyone, regardless of what makes us differe