Faculty - Teresa Mares

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Teresa Mares, Assistant Professor

Area of expertise

Research interests focus on sustainable food systems and food movements, Latino/a migration in the United States, environmental justice, and diet-related health disparities.

Contact Information
Email: teresa.mares@uvm.edu
Phone:(802) 656-5706
Office Hours: by appointment
Williams Hall, Room 501

Teresa Mares is an Assistant Professor of Anthropology at the University of Vermont and is affiliated with the Transdisciplinary Research Initiative in Food Systems. She received her B.A. (Summa Cum Laude) in Anthropology and Foreign Languages and Literatures with a concentration in Spanish from Colorado State University (2002), and her M.A. (2005) and Ph.D. (2010) in Sociocultural Anthropology from the University of Washington. She also completed a graduate certificate in Women Studies at the University of Washington. Prior to coming to UVM, Dr. Mares was a Social and Behavioral Sciences Diversity Postdoctoral Fellow in the Department of Anthropology at Ohio State University.

Dr. Mares’ research focuses on the intersection of food and migration studies, and she is particularly interested in the ways that the diets and foodways of Latino/a immigrants change as a result of migration. Her dissertationWe Are Made of Our Food: Latino/a Immigration and the Practices and Politics of Eating investigated how the claims of Latino/a immigrants to food justice and food entitlements are made, reshaped, and denied in Seattle, Washington. Analytically, Dr. Mares engages with theories and concepts of citizenship and transnationalism, identity and foodways, and contemporary social movements. She is committed to applied, community-based ethnographic methodologies and is currently developing a new project on food access and food security among Latino/a dairy workers in Vermont.

Recent publications include, “Here We Have the Food Bank”: Latino/a Immigration and the Contradictions of Emergency Food” in Food and Foodways; “Tracing Immigrant Identity Through the Plate and the Palate” in Latino Studies, “Mapping the Food Movement: Addressing Inequality and Neoliberalism” (co-written with Alison Alkon) in Environment and Society: Advances in Research; and a chapter entitled “Environmental and Food Justice: Toward Local, Slow, and Deep Food Systems” (co-written with Devon Peña) in the edited volume Cultivating Food Justice: Race, Class, and Sustainability. During the fall of 2013, Dr. Mares is teaching courses on Food and Culture, and Cultural Anthropology. She will be on research leave during the spring of 2014.