Environmental Studies at UVM

Thomas Hudspeth

Professor, Advisor

Environmental Program, Rubenstein School of Environment and Natural Resources

Bittersweet House Room 301

  • 802-656-0171

Advising Appointment Hours: 

Thursdays 1:00 - 4:00, call 656-4055 for appts.

Areas of Interest: 

Sustainability, sustainability education, sustainable communities, environmental education, environmental interpretation, ecotourism, citizen participation, international environmental issues

Bio: 

Tom Hudspeth is Professor of Environmental Studies and Natural Resources in the Rubenstein School of Environment and Natural Resources.  He currently teaches courses in Sustainability Education (ENVS 295), Creating Environmentally Sustainable Communities (ENVS 204), and Place-based Landscape Analysis and Sustainability Education (NR 378).  Previously, he taught courses in Environmental Education (ENVS 294) and Environmental Interpretation (PRT 255). Tom has led 18 travel-study  courses to Latin America--Belize, Costa Rica, Ecuador, Honduras, Brazil-- addressing ecotourism as a tool for sustainability. .  He and others are working to gain recognition of the Greater Burlington area as a "Regional Center of Expertise in Education for Sustainable Development (ESD)" as part of the U.N. Decade for ESD, 2005-2014.

Tom's scholarly interest in sustainability addresses learning processes at individual and institutional scales that contribute to a more sustainable world.  More specifically, he applies insights of behavioral sciences to facilitate environmentally responsible behavior--that is, help people to become more environmentally literate and to live more sustainably.

Tom came to UVM to help set up one of the first university-wide Environmental Studies programs in the U.S., and has served as Assistant Director and Acting Director of the Environmental Program, Chair of the RSENR Natural Resource Planning graduate program, and Interim Director of the Office of Community-University Partnerships and Service-Learning.

Tom is a George V. Kidder Outstanding Faculty Award winner from UVM (2002), Excellence in Teaching Award winner from Vermont Campus Compact (2005), CUPS Outstanding Achievement Award winner from UVM (2010), Environmental Merit Award winner from Environmental Protection Agency (1996), and was a Fulbright Senior Scholar in Germany (1999). He is a Fellow at the Gund Institute for Ecological Economics, a Sustainability Faculty Fellow, a Service-Learning Fellow, and a  Fellow at the Center for Research on Vermont.

Education: 

  • Ph.D. Natural Resources, University of Michigan, 1982
  • M.S. Natural Resources, University of Michigan, 1972
  • B.A. Liberal Arts, emphasis on Environmental Studies, Biology, and German, Williams College, 1970

Other Professional Affiliations: 

  • North American Association for Environmental Education (formerly National Association for Environmental Education)
  • National Association for Interpretation
  • Association for Environmental Studies and Sciences
  • Association for the Advancement of Sustainability in Higher Education

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Info for Prospective Graduate Students: 

My scholarly interest in sustainability addresses learning processes at individual and institutional scales that contribute to a more sustainable world.  More specifically, I apply insights of behavioral sciences to facilitate environmentally responsible behavior--that is, help people to become more environmentally literate and to live more sustainably. Over the past two decades, as part of the Sustainability Stories: A Field Guide to Sustainability in the Greater Burlington Area project, my students and I have written and videotaped sustainability stories on individuals and groups in the area who serve as sustainability exemplars or role models for others to follow or emulate in bringing about the transition to more environmentally-sustainable communities.  These stories help make the concept of sustainability come alive, make it more concrete, humanize it, put a face on it. We have also interpreted sustainability initiatives on college and university campuses, such as the Greening of Aiken building at UVM. And we have developed sustainability education curricula on topics for which UVM, Burlington, and Vermont are known, such as: community-based food systems, ecomachine, Genuine Progress Indicator, valuing ecosystem services re: pollination,  and climate change adaptation.