University of Vermont

Sodexo Sustainablity Gallery

Sodexo Sustainability Gallery 
Real-time energy-use and savings data, generated by the Building Dashboard® system.

Curious?

Explore the Davis Center's Monitoring System.

The Davis Center uses four energy commodities: electricity for lighting and plug-in equipment (like computers), steam for heating, chilled water for cooling, and natural gas for cooking and fireplaces. Overall, the Davis Center is expected to use 52% less energy than a conventional building of the same size (186,000 square feet). The UVM Energy Management Office oversees planning, implementation and accountability measures for the building's amazing energy-saving technologies.

Learn more about the systems:

Electricity
  • All of the electricity used at the Davis Center is purchased from Burlington Electric Department, a local public utility that buys from a fairly clean mix of sources with over 60% from renewable sources.
  • The building was designed to use 31% less electricity for lighting than a conventional building of the same size (186,000 square feet).
  • Windows and sky-lights in the building maximize natural light and thus minimize the need for electric light during the day. Computerized lighting control systems automatically adjust light levels and shut off lights when rooms are unoccupied.
  • Ventilation systems throughout the building are equipped with energy conservation motors. The kitchens have special Intelli-HoodTM exhaust fans that automatically slow down when cooking demands are low and speed up only when cooking volume increases - this saves electricity and increases the life of the fans.
  • Want more detail? To learn more about specific electricity-saving technologies around the building, take the interactive tour via the Building Dashboard or contact the UVM Energy Management Office.
Heating
  • The steam used to heat the Davis Center is generated at UVM's Central Heating and Cooling Plant and the fuel mix used in the plant's boilers is primarily natural gas (approximately 95% in 2007) and some fuel oil (approximately 5% in 2007).
  • Rooms in the Davis Center are very smart! Carbon dioxide sensors, which detect the presence of people by detecting the carbon dioxide in their breath, signal a room's heating system to shut off when no one is using the room. When somebody opens a window, computerized sensors send a signal to shut off the heating.
  • The heat recovery ventilation system on the roof captures heat from air as it is exhausted from the building. This captured heat is used to warm cold air coming into the building so that steam energy can be conserved.
  • The building was designed to use 59% less energy for heating and cooling than a conventional building of comparable size.
Cooling
  • The chilled water used to cool the Davis Center is generated at UVM's Central Heating and Cooling Plant using energy from excess steam. The fuel mix used in the plant's boilers in the summer is 100% natural gas, a very efficient fuel.
  • Rooms in the Davis Center are very smart! Carbon dioxide sensors, which detect the presence of people by detecting the carbon dioxide in their breath, signal a room's air-conditioning to shut off when no one is using the room. When somebody opens a window, computerized sensors send a signal to shut off the cooling.
  • On warm days, the heat recovery ventilation system on the roof uses the cool exhaust air to pre-cool the warm intake air so energy can be conserved.
  • The building was designed to use 59% less energy for heating and cooling than a conventional building of comparable size.
Natural Gas
  • The natural gas that is burned at the Davis Center for cooking in the kitchens and fireplaces in the lounges is purchased from Vermont Gas Systems, Inc.. The gas comes from Canada by pipeline.
Natural Gas for Heating
  • The UVM Energy Management Office has submitted for $18,000 in Vermont Gas Systems rebates based on tight insulation and efficient ventilation systems in Davis that will suppress demand for steam-heat from natural gas burned at the Central Heating and Cooling Plant.
Equipment
  • The public computers in Davis are all Apple iMacs©. They use energy very efficiently and also conserve material resources since the screen display and CPU are contained in the monitor.
  • Office, kitchen and cleaning equipment in the building are ENERGY STAR® qualified, which means that they are energy-efficient choices.
Renewables
  • Electricity used in the Davis Center is purchased from the Burlington Electric Department (BED), which buys from at least 60% renewable sources, primarily from wood chips burned at the McNeil Generating Station in Burlington.
  • UVM's 10 kW wind turbine is visible from the oval in front of Davis. The electricity generated by this large residential-size turbine returns to the electrical grid to offset the electrical consumption of exterior lights.
  • Solar panels on the roof of UVM's Central Heating & Cooling Plant generate electricity that is used to help light the Plant. Since the building's steam and chilled-water come from the Plant, the UVM residential-sized Solar Energy Project is indirectly contributing to Davis Center operations.
Carbon Footprint
  • As part of the Association of American College and University Presidents' Climate Commitment, the University will publish an inventory of Greenhouse Gas Emissions at UVM from 1990-2006. The Davis Center provides a case-study to illustrate first steps in how emissions from building systems can be reduced.
  • Want specifics? To monitor carbon emissions from electricity, heating, cooling and natural gas usage at Davis, visit the Building Dashboard®.
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