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Side and Transom Lights

Side and transom lights consist of the long bands of windows that flank and rest atop the main entrance.

Sidelights were quite popular during the Federal and Greek Revival eras, from the late 18th century through the 1860s. Sidelights reappeared during the Colonial Revival Era. Federal era sidelights, seen in the image below on the left, usually featured intricate tracery on the glass. Greek Revival and Colonial Revival sidelights usually consisted of small, undecorated panes of glass, as seen in the image on the right.

Side and Transom Lights Side and Transom Lights

Side and Transom Lights: Image courtesy of Elizabeth André

Transom lights were also quite popular during the Federal, Greek Revival, and Colonial Revival periods and usually consisted of small panes of glass in a long, rectangular band, as seen below on the left. Larger, single-pane transom lights often appeared on Victorian era houses of the late 19th century. Italianate, French Second Empire, and Queen Anne doors are often topped with transom lights, some of which feature stained glass or tracery.

Side and Transom Lights Side and Transom Lights

Side and Transom Lights: Image courtesy of Elizabeth André

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