The University of Vermont is a member of the Faculty Resource Network, a national consortium of 50 universities and colleges centered at New York University (NYU).

The Faculty Resource Network offers a Scholar-in-Residence program in which participants spend either a semester-long sabbatical or a month-long summer residency engaging in research, revising and developing curricula, and producing manuscripts for publication.  Additionally, the Network hosts a series of week-long intensive seminars designed to enhance the teaching and scholarship of participants at their home institutions.

The Network invites you to submit an application to participate in their 2018 summer seminars and summer scholar-in-residence program.

Interested faculty must apply to the seminars, and participation is limited to approximately 25 per seminar in order to ensure a focused, collegial experience.  This is an opportunity to study a topic of importance to your teaching and research in a collegial environment. Successful applicants are provided with accommodations in residence halls, breakfast and lunch for the seminar week, as well as all the reading materials required for the program. Please contact Professional Training and Development for more information.

These opportunities are available to UVM tenure and non-tenure track faculty whose primary assignment is teaching, and who have at least a .75 FTE for nine months or more.

FNR Summer Seminars

One-week seminars at New York University's Washington Square Campus, participants are exposed to the most recent scholarship in their fields while being given the opportunity to develop teaching and curriculum strategies for direct classroom application.

The summer seminar experience offers:

  • Lectures
  • Field trips
  • Presentations
  • Research
  • Hands-on demonstrations
  • Interactive discussions

Seminars run from Monday to Friday between nine thirty and five o'clock, with a break for lunch.

Network Summer 2018: Monday June 11th to Friday June 15th, 2018

Network Summer 2018 Seminars:

  • Classroom Teaching Effectiveness
  • Designing Student Assessments Using Technology and Media
  • Entrepreneurship in Action
  • Food in the 21st Century: Health, Environment, and Culture
  • Forty Years of Revolution: Understanding State and Society in the Islamic Republic of Iran, Then and Now
  • Gender and Sexuality in Film
  • Reacting to the Past – Greenwich Village, 1913: Suffrage, Labor, and the New Woman
  • Separating the Signal From the Noise: The Science and the Communication of Climate Change
  • Social Media and Literacy in the College Classroom: New Pathways to Learning
  • The Haitian Experience in Literature
  • The Uses of Antiquity: The Classical World in Contemporary Thought
  • Writing Successful Grant Proposals

To apply for participation in a 2018 seminar and for more information, please visit the Faculty Resource Network website.

Please email each of the four application materials as four separate PDF attachments to develop@uvm.edu on or before February 1, 2018 (prior to the NYU deadline).

(PLEASE NOTE: While the deadline for submitting applications to NYU is February 12, 2018, your application must be signed by Sherwood Smith, Senior Executive Director for Diversity, Engagement and Professional Development, to be considered by NYU, therefore the earlier February 1st deadline.

A copy of the application can be found on the Network Summer Application website.

The application packet for Network Summer seminars must include the following:

  • Application
  • Statement of intent*
  • Curriculum vitae
  • One letter of support from the Dean or Chair of your department

*The statement of intent should be at least one page in length indicating your intellectual and/or academic interests and the research or curricular development project you hope to produce as a result of participating in a Network faculty enrichment seminar. Indicate specific courses or programs which will benefit your institution as a result of your participation in Network Summer. The letter of support must indicate the value of your participation in Network Summer to your school or department.

About the Seminars

Classroom Teaching Effectiveness

When the conveners of this seminar began collaborating in 2005, they each approached faculty development from two entirely different backgrounds: academia and high-level executive training. Their combined research efforts have thus led to the development of distinctly comprehensive professional communication programs.

In this highly interactive workshop, we will identify and focus on your individual strengths and difficulties relating to teaching effectiveness. The discussions will be broadly applicable to all disciplines and subjects.

During the seminar, you will be guided through a project that targets a weakness in your teaching effectiveness identified through self-analysis. By the end of the week, you will learn key principles, develop skills, and apply practical strategies to improve your classroom teaching. Topics to be considered include syllabus development, content design, presentation delivery, feedback methods, assessment tools, conflict resolution, educational technology, and overall course management. In addition, there will be discussions related to career advancement and intentional leadership.

This seminar is suitable for faculty members of all levels and experience who engage in classroom teaching. While not required, you are strongly encouraged to bring a computer that has access to presentation design software such as PowerPoint or Keynote. You will receive a copy of the book A Guide to Better Teaching, authored by the conveners, which will support many of the concepts and strategies covered in the seminar.

About the Conveners

Leila Jahangiri is clinical professor and chair of the department of prosthodontics at New York University and recipient of New York University’s Distinguished Teaching Award (2014). She completed her B.D.S. at King’s College, University of London (UK), and her D.M.D. training, certificate in prosthodontics, and master’s of medical sciences from Harvard, where she received the Joseph L. Henry Award for “Overall Achievement in Clinical and Research Training and Contribution to the School.”

In addition to her field of clinical expertise, Dr. Jahangiri’s scholarship is on teaching effectiveness and curriculum design. As department chair, she has mentored faculty at all levels of experience, while managing the teaching efforts of over seventy-five faculty and overseeing a highly diverse curriculum. She has held frequent global faculty training programs for more than 45 schools focusing on: syllabus development, content design/delivery, feedback methods, assessment tools, conflict management, educational technology, and leadership skills. Her principles on teaching effectiveness are discussed in her book A Guide to Better Teaching (Rowman and Littlefield 2012), which is used as a core textbook at several business schools.

Leila can be reached at lj14@nyu.edu

Tom Mucciolo is president of MediaNet, Inc., a presentation skills and leadership effectiveness company in New York City. An internationally recognized industry expert in visual communications, Tom has served as a presentation skills consultant for major corporations since 1985, concentrating on the scripting, visual design, and delivery skills associated with presentations. High-profile communicators, including corporate leaders, politicians, and media personalities, as well as presenters at every organizational level, demand his coaching expertise.

In 2005, Tom joined the faculty of New York University to increase the communication effectiveness of teachers and administrators. He collaborated with Dr. Leila Jahangiri to complete an extensive study on teaching and presentation effectiveness, the results of which have been published in the book A Guide to Better Teaching.

Tom is the co-author of five other books: Purpose, Movement, Color (MediaNet, Inc.), and Special Edition Using Microsoft PowerPoint 2000, 2002, 2003, and 2007 (Macmillan, Pearson, MediaNet). He is also co-author of two interactive multimedia learning modules, Mechanics-Basic Skills and Media-Design Skills, which cover delivery and design skills.

Tom delivers his communications expertise on his Visually Speaking blog; he can be reached at tom@medianet-ny.com

Designing Student Assessments Using Technology and Media

To prepare students to think systematically, creatively, and critically requires new thinking about not only what should be taught in school, but also how to develop valid assessments that measure and support the competencies needed for success in school and beyond.

Instructors are often challenged by the following assessment questions:

  • What have my students learned?
  • How will I know what they have learned?
  • How can I modify the learning experience and/or instruction to help students meet my learning objectives?
  • What are the different modalities for assessing student learning?
  • When are the best opportunities for assessing student learning?
  • How can I reflect on my own instruction and evaluate the quality of my teaching?

This interactive seminar will provide hands-on experience with a variety of assessment models and approaches. Curated readings and videos will be provided. Participants will have the opportunity to create assessments related to their course(s) as well as self-assessments of their teaching. Participants will share their ideas and work together to develop new assessment ideas.

The seminar will explore the following topics:

  • Crafting meaningful learning objectives
  • Evaluating learning objectives
  • Formation and summative assessments
  • Assessments for in-person, blended, and online environments
  • Designing rubrics
  • Traditional and non-traditional forms of assessment
  • Reliability and validity issues
  • Working with our peers

By the end of the seminar, participants will be able to design learning objectives that align with assessments and course goals; design various types of formative and summative assessments; design and apply various evaluative strategies for instruction; and present a coherent assessment plan.

About the Conveners

Elizabeth McAlpin is the project director of research and outcomes assessment at NYUIT. Her team assists faculty in assessing technology-enhanced course designs aimed to increase student engagement and outcomes. Prior to this role she was the assistant director of learning and curricular development in the Global Learning and Innovation group at NYUIT, where she led a team of 12+ instructional technologists who worked with faculty to reimagine their courses with innovative pedagogy using technology and media. She holds an undergraduate degree from Denison University, an Ed.M. in instructional technology and media from Teachers College, and an M.A. in educational communication and technology from New York University, where she also is currently pursuing her doctorate. In addition to her full-time position, she also teaches as an adjunct at NYU. Her interests include effective educational design, innovative pedagogy and assessment, and educational technology and media for all kinds of learning experiences.

Anandi Nagarajan is the assistant director of instructional and interactive design at NYUIT. Her team specializes in educational design technology, media production, and interactive development, and facilitates the design and implementation of technology-enhanced initiatives across the university. She has an Ed.M. in learning, cognition, and development, and a Ph.D. in educational psychology from Rutgers University, where she has designed and taught numerous courses in face-to-face, hybrid, and online settings. She continues to serve as an adjunct instructor at Rutgers and Indiana Universities. Her research in teaching and instructional design focuses on combining optimal models of instructional pedagogy with effective and efficient technologies to maximize opportunities for active student engagement. Her main areas of expertise are in problem-based learning, formative assessment strategies, and active learning methods. She serves on the doctoral research committee of two doctoral students at Rutgers, conducts manuscript reviews for several research publications, and volunteers for organizations, including Educause, Online Learning Consortium, and the American Educational Research Association.

Entrepreneurship in Action

In this seminar, we will explore how to design and implement a capstone project in which students serve as marketing consultants to real businesses. The sessions will be highly interactive, combining lectures, discussion, and the hands-on development of a capstone project.

Drawing on his experience facilitating capstone projects in business classes, the convener will demonstrate how he has connected student teams to local food businesses to collaborate on expansion plans. Students benefit in multiple ways, learning from their clients’ experience and expertise, while in turn helping local entrepreneurs increase sales. The marketing capstone project has the potential to transform students, especially economically disadvantaged students who lack entrepreneurial role models.

We will consider every aspect of the capstone project and its design, including:

  • Identifying potential clients
  • Preparing for the initial client interview
  • Preparing a marketing research plan
  • Identifying target markets and populations
  • Examining and selecting primary and secondary research tools
  • Executing field research
  • Analyzing research results
  • Developing and executing a digital, research-based marketing campaign

The second part of the seminar will culminate in the collaborative development of possible capstone projects based on the examples and methodologies discussed.
Food in the 21st Century: Health, Environment, and Culture

The current interest in food has historical roots that reach back centuries.  Yet in the last 30 years or so in the United States, we’ve witnessed an emerging food “revolution” that has attempted to counter (or at least circumvent) the worst aspects of the industrialization of food.  This seminar will explore the American landscape of food in all its broad socio-cultural, historical, environmental, and health contexts. Topics will include: the industrialization of food, the turn to organic and sustainable agriculture, the complexities of improving the American diet, food waste, issues of social justice and equal access to good food, and the U.S. vis-a-vis the globalization of the food supply.

About the Convener

Amy Bentley is Professor in the Department of Nutrition and Food Studies at New York University. A historian with interests in the social, historical, and cultural contexts of food, she is the author, most recently, of Inventing Baby Food: The Industrialization of the American Diet (University of California Press, 2014).

Forty Years of Revolution: Understanding State and Society in the Islamic Republic of Iran, Then and Now
Co-sponsored by the Hagop Kevorkian Center for Near Eastern Studies at New York University

Iran is frequently presented in the media, but how much do we really know about this nation’s complex, diverse, and dynamic society? This week-long seminar will explore the various factors and manifestations of the 1979 revolution that overthrew the Pahlavi monarchy and led to the fashioning of the Islamic Republic in Iran. The seminar will study the revolutionary foment through contemporary sources, multidisciplinary materials, and an array of perspectives. This history of the revolution will set the stage for understanding post-revolutionary Iran and such questions as why the multi-class, urban, and ideologically plural revolutionary coalition gave way to an Islamist form of government; the extent to which Iran is simultaneously a republic and a clerically dominated political system; and how the revolutionary spirit is or is not sustained across four decades and different historical and global contexts. Interdisciplinary readings for the seminar will include assignments appropriate for undergraduate learners. Discussions will focus on ways to introduce primary and secondary source material on Iran to students new to the topic. The seminar will include invited academic and non-academic guests and possibly field trips.

About the Convener

Arang Keshavarzian is associate professor and director of graduate studies in NYU’s department of Middle Eastern and Islamic Studies. His general fields of research and teaching are comparative politics of the Middle East with a focus on issues related to political economy, authoritarianism, and social movements. Much of his writing focuses on modern Iran, although Keshavarzian has studied, conducted research, and taught in several other countries in the Middle East and North Africa. Keshavarzian’s research has revolved around questions of change and continuity as reflected and produced by socioeconomic hierarchies, political imperatives, and collective solidarities. His book, Bazaar and State in Iran (2007), traces the structure of the Tehran Bazaar under the Pahlavi monarchy and Islamic Republic, and sheds light on the organization and governance of markets as well as state-society dynamics. His current research examines the Persian Gulf in order to analyze the processes of late imperialism and globalization from the perspective of local circuits of trade and transnational alliances. Keshavarzian’s essays have appeared in Politics and Society, International Journal of Middle East Studies, Economy and Society, and Geopolitics, in addition to a number of edited volumes. He is on the editorial committee of Middle East Report and a member of the Board of Directors of the Middle East Studies Association.

Gender and Sexuality in Film

How can we account for the appeal of the screen personae of Lillian Gish and Douglas Fairbanks to audiences of the 1910s and 1920s? Of Barbara Stanwyck and William Powell to audiences of the 1930s and 1940s? Of Marilyn Monroe, Rock Hudson and John Wayne in the 1950s and 1960s; Pam Grier or Jane Fonda in the 1970s; or Halle Berry, Tom Cruise, or Angelina Jolie today? Their popularity must be understood in relation to the specific social and cultural contexts in which they appeared. Each persona possessed great resonance for its own era, but can hardly be imagined affecting a different era in a similar way. Imagine a Hollywood film featuring Pam Grier in the 1920s or one with Lillian Gish today? Gender images that resonate deeply for one era can seem preposterous for another. Why, and what pedagogical pertinence does this issue have?

A related and complex issue involves the significance of the off-screen lives and sexualities of behind-the-camera directors, such as Dorothy Arzner, Pedro Almodovar, and George Cukor, for an understanding of their films. Furthermore, how does the gender and sexual orientation of audience members affect their understanding of the films they watch? The same film shown to a diverse audience can elicit wildly different responses.

This seminar will explore the diversity of ways in which gender and sexuality have been represented and understood in (primarily Hollywood) films over the past century, and will establish contexts for understanding their socio-cultural significance. We also will examine the presence and absence of women, gays, and transgender people behind the camera, and will address questions whose answers vary substantially with the era to which they apply. Those questions include, among others: what is a woman and what is a man; what agency do they have in determining their professional fates or in resisting unacceptable options imposed upon them; what are the power relations between women and men; what are the social roles and responsibilities available to women; and what determines whether women/men appear admirable or subversive, progressive or reactionary, desirable or transgressive in the eyes of a particular audience?

The seminar will draw upon theoretical and critical approaches developed within the fields of women’s studies, feminist film studies, masculinity studies, art history, literary studies, gay-lesbian-bisexual-transgender studies, and social history. We will explore representations of gender and sexuality with attention to race, nation, age, and genre, as well as practices and politics within the film industry. We also will discuss filmic images of women and men with reference to those simultaneously circulating in the culture at large, as well as ways in which such images have changed over time.

Pertinent readings will be made available to seminar members and films will be shown and discussed in class. The responses to these materials, drawing upon the cultural and pedagogical backgrounds of seminar members, are an important component of the seminar. Guest speakers will share their expertise and pedagogical applications on this topic. The seminar will engage material pertinent to many disciplines, and we will discuss ways in which we can incorporate its content into diverse curricula.

About the Convener

William Luhr is professor of English and film at Saint Peter’s University and co-chair of the faculty-level Columbia University Seminar on Cinema and Interdisciplinary Interpretation. His recent books include Film Noir for John Wiley-Blackwell Publishing, 2012 (Chinese edition, 2014) and Screening Genders (co-edited with Krin Gabbard) for Rutgers University Press, 2008. The fourth edition of his Thinking About Movies: Watching, Questioning, Enjoying (co-authored with Peter Lehman) for John Wiley Publishing will appear in 2018. Luhr’s writings have been published widely, and he lectures in both national and international venues.

Reacting to the Past – Greenwich Village, 1913: Suffrage, Labor, and the New Woman

The year is 1913: the place, New York City. The cultural capital of the USA is abuzz with new ideas, both in art and in life—and a new generation of thinkers, calling themselves Bohemians, is intent on combining the two, bringing new ways of seeing the world, fostered in art and literature, to bear on their own lives and the life of the nation. At the Armory Show, works by Post-Impressionist painters and sculptors are on display alongside those of the Ashcan School, challenging traditional perceptions of what art should depict and how; on the streets, workers are organizing for labor rights, and women of all classes for—or against—the vote. Using the award-winning Reacting to the Past pedagogy, this seminar uses a game-based format to plunge participants into an atmosphere of cultural ferment and political possibility, giving each individual participant a personal stake in the passionate debates that animate the salons, cafes, and dive bars of Greenwich Village.

Greenwich Village, 1913: Suffrage, Labor, and the New Woman transports participants to the beginning of the modern era when urbanization, industrialization, and massive waves of immigration were transforming the U.S. way of life. As the game begins, suffragists are demanding a constitutional amendment for the vote. What, they ask, is women’s place in society? Are they to remain in the home or take an active role in the government of their communities and their nation? Labor has turned to the strike to demand living wages and better conditions; some are even proposing an industrial democracy where workers take charge of industries. Can corporate capitalism allow an economically just society or must it be overturned? African-Americans, suffering from the worst working conditions, disenfranchisement, and social segregation, debate how to support their community through education and protest, thereby challenging their continuing marginalization in both the South and the North. Members of all these groups converge in Greenwich Village to debate their views with artists and bohemians, who are in the process of remaking themselves into the new men and new women of the twentieth century. Their spirited conversations not only show a deep understanding of nineteenth-century thinkers like Elizabeth Cady Stanton and Karl Marx; they are also informed by such contemporaries as Charlotte Perkins Gilman, Jane Addams, W.E.B. Du Bois, Emma Goldman, John Dewey, Franz Boas, and Sigmund Freud. The game asks what social changes are most important as well as how one can or should realize these goals.

Greenwich Village 1913 uses the Reacting to the Past (RTTP) pedagogy, an award-winning series of immersive role-playing games that actively engage students in their own learning. RTTP draws students into the past to promote engagement with big ideas and improve writing, oral communication and other academic skills. Students assume the roles of historical characters and practice critical thinking, primary source analysis, and the art of argument, both written and spoken. The roles and debates are informed by classic texts in the history of ideas; class sessions are run entirely by seminar participants, in character and in debate. Recognized with the 2004 Theodore Hesburgh Award for pedagogical innovation, RTTP has been featured in numerous publications including Change magazine, the Chronicle of Higher Education, and the New York Times; faculty members at over 300 institutions worldwide have adopted the pedagogy.

About the Convener

A recognized pedagogical innovator, Rebecca Stanton teaches courses at Columbia University, CUNY, and NYU, and has introduced the Reacting to the Past pedagogy to faculty from all over the nation at numerous workshops and presentations. She also pioneered an after-school program using the Greenwich Village game for Harlem high school students, with grant support from the Teagle Foundation. Professor Stanton holds a Ph.D. in Russian literature from Columbia University and has published extensively on the literature and culture of the Soviet period, with a particular focus on the interfaces between literature, life, and politics. In her teaching, she has used games both within and outside her home discipline, immersing students in 1917 Petrograd, 5th-century (BCE) Athens, and late Ming China, among other adventures.

Social Media and Literacy in the College Classroom: New Pathways to Learning

As journalism programs at colleges across the nation highlight digital news platforms and media, social media has become an integral part of the curriculum. The use of Twitter, Facebook, and Instagram for reporting is no longer a novelty, but a given. Such tools—useable by anyone—are altering how journalists do their jobs and how people consume news.

The changes caused by social media present as many challenges for learning and communication as they do opportunities, calling for enhanced media literacy in the academy and beyond. Teachers need to consider—with their students—how social media impacts scholarship and instruction in the classroom, and how they can take advantage of its many benefits. We need to consider questions both practical and ethical: What exactly should journalists be tweeting or sharing? How can we best communicate our stories, or our research? What skills do journalists and other professional communicators need to succeed in today’s ever-changing media environment? And as teachers, how can we best leverage the interactivity and engagement afforded by social media for the purpose of student learning?

This seminar will tackle these questions and more through a series of discussions and readings. Participants will also have the opportunity to develop and implement a social media strategy for delivering some aspect of their own research.

About the Convener

David J. Dent is an associate professor of journalism at New York University and has also taught in the Africana Studies program. Dr. Dent has twice received NYU’s Golden Dozen award for excellence in teaching and service and has served as advisor and workshop leader for the University’s Faculty Resource Network. He has also served on the board of The Calhoun School and is a graduate of Morehouse College and Columbia University Graduate School of Journalism. Dr. Dent is author of In Search of Black America, a New York Times Book Review Notable of 2000.

Separating the Signal From the Noise: The Science and the Communication of Climate Change

Since the Industrial Revolution, Earth’s climate system has been affected by both natural and human influences. The natural influences consist of external factors—such as volcanic eruptions and changes in the sun’s energy output—and the internal “noise” associated with phenomena like El Niños and La Niñas. “Climate noise” varies on a wide range of different space and timescales, yielding a rich background of natural fluctuations in climate.

It is against this backdrop of natural variations that the “signals” arising from human activities must be identified. These signals are associated with human-caused changes in atmospheric greenhouse gases, particulate pollution, and land surface properties. The separation of anthropogenic signals from natural climate noise has been the subject of scientific inquiry for nearly four decades. The history of this field of inquiry will be covered in the seminar.

Areas of emphasis will include: (1) the transition from studies of simple, global-mean changes in surface temperature to pattern-based “fingerprint” research involving a wide range of different climate variables; (2) the credibility of the numerical models and observations used in separating climate signals from climate noise; (3) human impacts on the large-scale conditions that influence hurricanes; and (4) “best practices” in responding to common myths and misconceptions about climate change.

Since the 1995 report of the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC), all major national and international scientific assessments have concluded that there is compelling evidence for a “discernible human influence” on global climate. These assessments also find that human-caused climate change poses significant risks to the lives and well-being of billions of people, and to the rich diversity of the biological world. Yet in 2017, this signal in scientific understanding is being overwhelmed—at least in the United States—by the persistent noise of willful ignorance. Such ignorance hampers progress in finding effective solutions to the problem of reducing greenhouse gas emissions. In this less than brave new world of fake news and alternative facts, it is imperative to communicate understanding of the causes, likely impacts, and seriousness of climate change. Strategies for achieving more effective communication will be explored in the final part of the seminar.

About the Convener

Benjamin Santer is an atmospheric scientist at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. Ben’s early research contributed to the historic “discernible human influence” conclusion of the 1995 Report by the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change. His recent work has attempted to identify human factors in a number of different climate variables. Dr. Santer holds a Ph.D. in climatology from the University of East Anglia, England. He spent five years at the Max-Planck Institute for Meteorology in Germany, and worked on the development and application of climate fingerprinting methods. He served as convening lead author of the climate-change detection and attribution chapter of the 1995 IPCC report, and was the convening lead author of a key chapter of the U.S. Climate Change Science Program’s report on “Temperature Trends in the Lower Atmosphere.” His awards include the Norbert Gerbier–MUMM International Award, a MacArthur Fellowship, the U.S. Department of Energy’s E.O. Lawrence Award, a Distinguished Scientist Fellowship from the U.S. Dept. of Energy, Office of Biological and Environmental Research, a Fellowship of the American Geophysical Union, and membership in the U.S. National Academy of Sciences.

The Haitian Experience in Literature
Co-sponsored by the Center for Latin American and Caribbean Studies at New York University

The successful slave revolution that led to the creation of the independent state of Haiti has spawned a large array of literary works in various genres by eminent Caribbean writers (principally francophone, anglophone and hispanophone). Seminar participants will read and interpret provocative works of drama (e.g. Aimé Césaire’s The Tragedy of King Christophe, Derek Walcott’s Haitian Trilogy), as well as of historical fiction (e.g. Alejo Carpentier’s novel The Kingdom of this World) that explore pivotal events in the Haitian experience during and after the revolution. Background readings in the historical and anthropological literature will provide cultural and social contexts for the discussion of the creative works (e.g. C.L.R. James’ Black Jacobins; Laurent Dubois’ Avengers of the New Word; Zora Neale Hurston’s Tell My Horse).

About the Convener

Gregson Davis, Andrew W. Mellon Research Professor in the Humanities at Duke University, teaches in the Department of Classical Studies and the Program in Literature. He has previously taught at Stanford University, Cornell University, and, most recently, New York University. His primary research specialties are the interpretation of poetic texts in the Greek and Roman as well as Caribbean (francophone and anglophone) traditions. In the domain of Augustan poetry, he has published monographs on Horace’s Odes, Virgil’s Eclogues and Ovid’s Metamorphoses. His abiding interest in contemporary Caribbean poetry is represented by three books on the late Martinican poet Aimé Césaire, including a new English translation of Cahier d’un retour au pays natal: Journal of a Homecoming (Duke University Press, 1917).

The Uses of Antiquity: The Classical World in Contemporary Thought
Co-sponsored by the Center for Ancient Studies at New York University

In the 2013 cinematic reboot of Superman, we discover a young Clark Kent clutching not a dime store comic book but … a well-worn copy of Plato’s Republic. What could possibly link this most American of films with this most Greek of texts?

The Uses of Antiquity explores this and other surprising juxtapositions of the modern and the ancient worlds. Indeed, it investigates the very idea of “the classics,” as it surveys the ways in which we construct our modernity through appropriations (or annihilations) of classical themes, texts, and figures. The seminar will first introduce the concept of reception theory, a budding field of cultural criticism that analyzes the creation of meaning at the point of reception; the seminar will then take a strongly comparative approach, as texts and myths from antiquity are studied alongside contemporary versions, in such media as film, comics, theater, and even video games. In this way, we will gallop through very recent and often striking receptions of the classical world, including political, gay/lesbian, multicultural, and popular appropriations.

In particular, we will explore especially ideological appropriations of the ancient world: art with a point to make—or an axe to grind. In this way, we’ll be formulating some ideas about what makes the classical world “classical”: why do we moderns insist on the periodization of history, and why do we invest the Greco-Roman world in particular with the mantle (and sometimes burden) of classicism?

This seminar presupposes no knowledge of Greek or Latin, but does demand a good sense of humor and a willingness to jump down the rabbit hole of popular culture (e.g., the comic book 300, the off-Broadway musical Hadestown). My goal is for seminar participants from any discipline to be able to incorporate reception theory into their own courses and research, as America constantly (and often surprisingly) re-fashions its own identity by using (or abusing) the classical past. Lastly, in New York City, we will take advantage of any contemporaneous art exhibits or theatrical events that illuminate the themes of the seminar.

About the Convener:

Thomas E. Jenkins is professor of classical studies at Trinity University in San Antonio, TX, and director of the Collaborative for Learning and Teaching. He is a past fellow of Harvard’s Center for Hellenic Studies and the American Council on Education, with research that cuts across a wide swathe of disciplines, including classics, theater, film, and gender studies. He was the winner of the inaugural Paul Rehak award for best article in LGBT studies in classics, and his recent book, Antiquity Now: The Classical World in the Contemporary American Imagination (Cambridge University Press, 2015), was named an Outstanding Academic Title by Choice for 2016. As an arts and theater critic, Tom’s work has appeared in both local media and national journals, and his goofy stage adaptation of Plautus’ The Haunted House premiered in 2013.

Writing Successful Grant Proposals

Do you need release-time in order to pursue your research? Do you need a mentoring or tutoring program to help your students succeed? Do you need to equip a lab with sophisticated equipment? All of these needs can be satisfied if you can learn to write competitive grants.

This workshop will help you prepare strong grant proposals. We will examine the components of a successful grant proposal: finding a potential funding source, analyzing an RFP (Request for Proposals), researching and stating the need for the grant, writing appropriate goals and objectives, describing the proposed activities and methods, and developing a credible evaluation plan along with a realistic budget.

The presenters will share their experience and accumulated wisdom. However, at the heart of this hands-on workshop is the opportunity for each participant to make substantial progress in developing his or her own idea into an actual grant proposal.

Each participant is asked to bring an idea for a grant proposal—whether you are a faculty researcher looking for release-time and equipment, a department chair or academic administrator seeking to expand a successful program, a student affairs administrator looking to create a new student support program, or an IT specialist or librarian looking for additional resources. Bring a paragraph to the first session that describes your idea. Participants will develop their ideas during the seminar by outlining need statements, goals and objectives, action plans, and the other components of a complete grant proposal.

The seminar will introduce some of the most helpful grants-writing resources available online and will include readings on how to construct a grant. Participants will be glad to hear that the presenters specialize in readings that run no more than 2-3 pages and get right to the heart of the topic. The seminar is designed for both beginners and intermediate grants writers.

About the Conveners:

Beverly and Bob Kahn are political scientists who have written grant proposals together and separately for many years. After receiving their doctorates from Indiana University, where Beverly specialized in Italian politics (winning both a Fulbright and Rome Prize) and Bob specialized in African American political ideology, they both taught at the University of South Carolina and The Ohio State University for 17 years before going off on separate careers as administrators.

Beverly has served in the roles of dean, vice president, and provost at Fairfield University, Pace University, and SUNY-Farmingdale and has authored more than $20 million in grants. In her current position at SUNY-Farmingdale, Beverly has written more than $12 million in major grants, including a First in the World Grant, a Title IIIA grant, and an SSS Trio grant (plus renewal) from the U.S. Department of Education as well as a Smart Grid grant from the U.S. Department of Energy.

Bob has served as dean, vice president, and grants director at Rockland, Bergen, Queensborough, and LaGuardia community colleges. In eight years at LaGuardia as grants director, Bob’s college brought in more than $100 million in grants––making LaGuardia, annually, the highest grant winner among City University of New York community colleges, higher than a number of CUNY four-year colleges, and usually more than twice as much as the CUNY community college in second place. Most recently, he has worked on special projects in the Grants Office at CUNY’s Advanced Science Research Center.

FNR Winter Seminars

Building upon the popularity of Network Summer, one of the largest and most successful faculty development programs in the nation, Network Winter offers faculty a new opportunity to study a topic of importance to their teaching and research in a collegial environment during winter intersession. These intensive seminars run concurrently during a week and cover a broad range of disciplines.

The 2018 Network Winter seminars, which will be held from January 14-18, 2019 at the University of the Sacred Heart (Universidad del Sagrado Corazón) in San Juan, Puerto Rico, will provide a comprehensive study of the power of the individual to affect change, examining this theme from various disciplinary perspectives. The schedule will include plenary sessions where each seminar convener will present an overview of their seminar topic to the entire group of program participants.

2018 Network Winter Seminars:

To apply for participation in a 2018 Network Winter seminar and for more information, please visit https://facultyresourcenetwork.org/programs-and-events/faculty-enrichment-seminars/network-winter/network-winter-2019/

To Apply

Please email each of the four application materials as four separate PDF attachments to develop@uvm.edu on or before September 24, 2018 (prior to the NYU deadline).

(PLEASE NOTE: While the deadline for submitting applications to NYU is October 1, 2018, your application must be signed by Sherwood Smith, Senior Executive Director for Diversity, Engagement and Professional Development, to be considered by NYU, therefore the earlier February 1st deadline.

A copy of the application can be found here: https://facultyresourcenetwork.org/wp-content/uploads/pdfs/NW-19-application-fillable.pdf?x16413

The application packet for Network Winter seminars must include the following:

  • Application
  • Statement of intent*
  • Curriculum vitae
  • One letter of support from the Dean or Chair of your department

*The statement of intent should be a statement of at least one page in length indicating your intellectual and/or academic interests and the research or curricular development project you hope to produce as a result of participating in a network faculty enrichment seminar. Indicate specific courses or programs which will benefit your institution as a result of your participation in Network Winter. The letter of support must indicate the value of your participation in Network Winter to your school or department.

The following seminars will be offered:

Performance as the Embodied Text Of Caribbean Resistance

With the rest of the Caribbean, Puerto Rico shares a brilliant history of experimental creativity in the visual and performing arts. Everyday objects, images, and spaces assume variegated and highly impacted plastic and aesthetic dimensions. Our seminar illuminates and celebrates examples of visual representation, performance art, alternative theater, and festival arts in Puerto Rico and other Caribbean spaces during the last four decades. Artist and artwork, performer and performance engage unresolved issues of empire and dependency, racialization, gender-sexual domination, and economic inequality that have marked life in the Caribbean since 1492.

In discussing creativity, resistance, and transformation, we will explore the notion of “shared bodies, shared spaces” (Erika Fischer-Lichte) with an emphasis on role reversal, community, touch, and liveness. In addition, we will consider a tapestry of interactive critical works by Roberto Fernández Retamar, Antonio Benítez-Rojo, Joseph Roach, Jill Dolan, and Barbara Ehrenreich for a deeper understanding of the power of Caribbean visual and performing arts.

The first half of the seminar focuses on theory, visual arts, installation, and assemblage; popular arts of mas(k)-making and masquerade; and protest art in demonstrations, graffiti, and political street theater. The second half highlights alternative theater practices from the 1980s to the present, and the almost simultaneous emergence of performance art. Although work by Puerto Rican artists and groups will receive particular attention, discussion will include comparable examples from other Caribbean societies.

About the Convener:

Lowell Fiet was educated at the University of Wisconsin (PhD 1973) and has taught at the University of Puerto Rico-Río Piedras since 1978. His dozens of reviews, articles, and books focus on Caribbean and Puerto Rican theater, drama, and performance. He is the founding editor of Sargasso, launched the Rockefeller Foundation-supported “Caribbean 2000” project, organized three National Endowment for the Humanities summer projects, and designed and for several years coordinated the UPR-Río Piedras PhD Program in Caribbean literature and linguistics. He was Eugenio María de Hostos Honorary Professor at UPR in 2001-2003, and has also served as the director of the Interdisciplinary Studies program in Humanities and the Institute of Caribbean Studies in Social Sciences. His books include El teatro puertorriqueño reimaginado (2004) and Caballeros, vejigantes, locas y viejos: Santiago Apóstol y los performeros afro-puertorriqueños (2007). His current work focuses on festival and carnival masks.

Download Application

The Power of One – A Political Perspective

“I am only one, but I am one. I cannot do everything, but I can do something. And I will not let what I cannot do interfere with what I can do.” — Edward Everett Hale

Throughout this seminar, we will consider how knowledge of our social milieu can support strategic leadership in order to overcome adversity in an intricate political world. As we assess our particular and shared realities from the standpoint of the theory of complexity and Foucault’s notion of power, we will examine how horizontal knowledge and collective leadership may promote good citizenship and a more inclusive society. We will also address the challenges of navigating a society characterized by the inequality and corruption that results from the wrongful use of power. In analyzing the ways in which leadership can be used to promote the common good, we will consider specific social contemporary situations, such as the current political struggles for inclusion, equity, and sexual rights.

About the Convener:

Jorge Benítez-Nazario was born in San Juan, Puerto Rico, in 1959. Since obtaining a PhD in Political Sociology at UW-Madison in 1986, he has held various positions at the University of Puerto Rico-Río Piedras campus, including professor of political science (1986-1999), associate director of the Honors Program (1996-1999), associate dean of academic affairs (2000-2003), professor of social policy (2003-2017), director of the Institute of Social Policy (2005-2008, 2015-2017), and director of the Doctoral Program in Administration and Analysis of Social Policy (2015-2017). He has lectured, conducted research, and published on the topics of political culture, political tolerance, political participation and elections, poverty and exclusion, citizenship and human capital. He has been a regular collaborator with the international research project World Values Survey since 1995. Dr. Benítez-Nazario previously participated in NYU’s Faculty Resource Network as a seminar convener during the summer of 2012.

Download Application

Women’s Activism in the Americas

The seminar will explore the individual and collective activisms of women of color, primarily as organizers, political figures, and public intellectuals during the late 20th century. Focusing mainly on the Puerto Rican and African American contexts, we will examine various women’s rights mobilizations that emerged to bring about social justice around race and gender in two different regions of the Americas. In addition to exploring various organizational efforts, the seminar (echoing THE POWER OF ONE rubric) will highlight the lives of various individuals, including Shirley Chisholm, Sila María Calderón, Pauli Murray, Barbara Smith, Mayra Santos-Febres, and Ana Irma Rivera Lassén, whose struggles against multiple inequalities impacted electoral politics, women’s lives and NGOs in significant ways.

About the Conveners:

Beverly Guy-Sheftall is founding director of the Women’s Research & Resource Center and Anna Julia Cooper Professor of Women’s Studies at Spelman College. She is past president of the National Women’s Studies Association (NWSA). Along with her co-editors, she published the first anthology of Black women’s literature, Sturdy Black Bridges: Visions of Black Women in Literature. Her recent books include Gender Talk: The Struggle for Women’s Equality in African American Communities (with Johnnetta Betsch Cole) and Still Brave: The Evolution of Black Women’s Studies (with Stanlie M. James and Frances Smith Foster). In progress is a study of the radical politics of Coretta Scott King.

Download Application

Special Spring Seminar - 2018

NO LONGER TAKING APPLICATIONS

Rewriting History: The New Science of Antiquity

Geared at all faculty members - not just archaelogists

Co-sponsored by the Center for Ancient Studies, New York University

Hosted by DEREE – The American College of Greece

When: May 8-12, 2018
Where: Athens, Greece
Application Deadline: CLOSED

The study of antiquity and ancient Greece is traditionally based on material culture, including art, architecture, and textual evidence. In recent years, however, bioarchaeology and archaeological science have opened a new field of problem-oriented, interdisciplinary research, offering a more people-centered approach to the ancient world. The Phaleron Bioarchaeological Project (PBP) (http://phaleron.digital-ascsa.org/gallery/) is the first large-scale, systematic bioarchaeological project in Greece, a collaboration between Arizona State University, the Wiener Laboratory for Archaeological Science of the American School of Classical Studies at Athens, and the Ephorate of Antiquities of West Attica, Piraeus, and the Islands (Greek Ministry of Culture). Focusing on the extensive cemetery (ca. 8th-4th centuries BC) recently excavated in Phaleron, the port of the ancient city of Athens, this project integrates archaeological, historical, mortuary, biological, chemical, and genetic data. This seminar, suitable for participants interested in learning how people lived during a time of sociopolitical turbulence in Athenian history, will examine new theoretical and methodological directions in the study of antiquity. Topics to be covered include:

  • Bioarchaeology and the study of human remains within their archaeological context.
  • Health, disease, trauma, and the study of paleopathology.
  • Nutrition and reconstruction of subsistence practices.
  • Human mobility and reconstruction of geographic origins using biogeochemistry.
  • Zooarchaeology and the study of animal remains.
  • Archaeobotany, the study of archaeological plant remains, and paleoenvironmental reconstruction.
  • Geoarchaeology and the utilization of geologic studies in site formation processes.

Seminar activities will include a field trip to the Wiener Laboratory of Archaeological Science, a dinner reconstructing the culinary and nutritional practices of ancient times, and a musical performance.

About the Convener:

Eleanna Prevedorou, a bioarchaeologist, is a postdoctoral researcher at the Wiener Laboratory of the American School of Classical Studies at Athens and a visiting researcher at Arizona State University. She also collaborates with the National and Kapodistrian University of Athens as a visiting lecturer in the Archaeology Graduate Program. Prevedorou holds a BA in archaeology from Greece and an MA and PhD in anthropology from Arizona State University. She serves as project manager and a co-principal Investigator of the Phaleron Bioarchaeological Project (Principal Investigator: Prof. Jane Buikstra, Arizona State University). Her research focuses on the excavation, analysis, and contextual interpretation of skeletal assemblages and archaeological sites in Attica and surrounding regions. She specializes in biodistance and biogeochemistry and has applied sophisticated analyses for the study of ancient human mobility and diet, establishing comparative, baseline data across the Aegean.

To Apply

Please email each of the four application materials as four separate PDF attachments to develop@uvm.edu on or before February 1, 2018 (prior to the NYU deadline).
(PLEASE NOTE: While the deadline for submitting applications to NYU is February 12, 2018, your application must be signed by Sherwood Smith, Senior Executive Director for Diversity, Engagement and Professional Development, to be considered by NYU, therefore the earlier February 1st deadline.

The application packet for Network Winter seminars must include the following:
• Application
•Statement of intent*
•Curriculum vitae
•One letter of support from the Dean or Chair of your department

Link to application download site: https://facultyresourcenetwork.org/rewriting-history-the-new-science-of-antiquity/

Summer Scholar-in-Residence Programs

The Summer 2018 Scholar-in-Residence program will be held from June 4 to June 29, 2018 at New York University’s Washington Square campus.

The Summer Scholar-in-Residence program allows Network faculty to come to New York University during the month of June to engage in research, develop curricula, and/or produce manuscripts for publication. The program allows scholars to explore new dimensions in their disciplines, to engage in intellectual exchange and investigate resources not available to them at their home institutions, to broaden their own pedagogical expertise, to enrich existing courses or create new ones, and to expand professional contacts.

To apply to be a Scholar-in-Residence for Summer 2018 and for more information, please visit the Faculty Resource Network website.

TO APPLY:

Please email each of the four application materials as four separate PDF attachments to develop@uvm.edu on or before February 1, 2018 (prior to the NYU deadline).

(PLEASE NOTE: While the deadline for submitting applications to NYU is February 12, 2018, your application must be signed by Sherwood Smith, Senior Executive Director for Diversity, Engagement and Professional Development, to be considered by NYU, therefore the earlier February 1st deadline. A copy of the application can be found here.

APPLICATION PROCEDURE

Applicants are required to submit an abstract and a clear and concise proposal of five pages or less detailing the intended scholarly activity or curricular development plan to their institution’s Faculty Resource Network representative.

Institutional Representatives

The proposal should delineate project goals (work to be completed while in residence), benefits to the applicant’s home institution, and the ways in which residence at NYU and in New York City will benefit the applicant’s research.

Applicants for the Scholar-in-Residence program should also indicate the NYU department(s) with which they wish to be associated and the name(s) of the faculty member(s) with whom they wish to work (if known). New York University bulletins may be consulted through the University’s home page at www.nyu.edu. (The Network cannot guarantee that the NYU faculty members requested by applicants will be available as Research Consultants during the month of June. If your requested consultant is unavailable, we will attempt to find a faculty member that is knowledgeable within the field you are researching.)

The letter of support from your division or department chair must indicate the value of your participation in the Scholar-in-Residence program to your school or department.

Network Summer: Michael E. Fassiotto Scholar-in-Residence Program

June 4 to June 29, 2018

The Michael E. Fassiotto Summer Scholar-in-Residency will be awarded on an annual basis to a faculty member whose project focuses on the development of innovative and unique pedagogies that can be implemented across a variety of disciplines to enhance the educational process.

Each year, during the month of June, the Michael E. Fassiotto Scholar-in-Residence will have the opportunity to engage in research, enrich an existing course or create a new one, broaden pedagogical expertise, and expand professional contacts. The awardee will meet with faculty colleagues at New York University and in New York City and will participate in activities scheduled as part of the larger Network Summer program which annually brings over 300 visiting faculty members to NYU's Washington Square campus.

In addition to accommodations and most meals, the awardee will receive a travel subvention and an honorarium of $1,000.

Prerequisites for participation in the Michael E. Fassiotto Summer Scholar-in-Residence program:

  • The applicant must be a full-time faculty member at a member institution of the Faculty Resource Network. The University of Vermont is a member institution.
  • The applicant must be approved and recommended by the Provost/Dean of their home institution for the term of the residency.
  • The proposed project must exemplify the goal of promoting pedagogical innovation on the scholar's home campus.
  • New York University must have the resources necessary to be of substantial benefit to the applicant's project goals.

For further details on prerequisites and accommodations please visit the Faculty Resource Network website.

To Apply

Please email each of the four application materials as four separate PDF attachments to develop@uvm.edu on or before February 1, 2018 (prior to the NYU deadline).

(PLEASE NOTE: While the deadline for submitting applications to NYU is February 12, 2018, your application must be signed by Sherwood Smith, Senior Executive Director for Diversity, Engagement and Professional Development, to be considered by NYU, therefore the earlier February 1st deadline.

A copy of the application can be found here: https://facultyresourcenetwork.org/programs-and-events/faculty-enrichment-seminars/network-summer/network-summer-2018/

The application packet for Network Winter seminars must include the following:

  • Application
  • Statement of intent*
  • Curriculum vitae
  • One letter of support from the Dean or Chair of your department

*The statement of intent should be a statement of at least one page in length indicating your intellectual and/or academic interests and the research or curricular development project you hope to produce as a result of participating in a network faculty enrichment seminar. Indicate specific courses or programs which will benefit your institution as a result of your participation in Network Winter. The letter of support must indicate the value of your participation in Network Winter to your school or department.

Network Summer Calvin B. Grimes Scholar-in-Residence Program

The Summer 2018 Calvin B. Grimes Scholar-in-Residence program will be held from June 4 to June 29, 2018 at New York University’s Washington Square campus.

The Calvin B. Grimes Summer Scholar-in-Residency will be awarded on an annual basis to a faculty member whose project furthers the goal of promoting cross-cultural understanding and tolerance through a closer alignment of the arts and the humanities. Throughout his career, Dr. Grimes championed the importance of expanding the role of the arts in the curriculum, even as performing and fine arts classes would be among the first to fall victim to cutbacks. As he stated,

The performing arts world is capable of promoting thoughts and ideas on images of reality in other peoples, communities, nations, and world cultures. This is a fundamental trait of great art regardless of medium. It promotes knowledge and understanding of cultures in similar manner to that expressed in literary forms, historical records, philosophical documents, etc. Then, careful attention to the performing arts, not only as sources of immense joy and entertainment, could become an enhanced resource for understanding cultural traditions different from our own. Such a state, it seems, would only promote greater respect for human distinctions.

Each year, during the month of June, the Calvin B. Grimes Scholar-in-Residence will have the opportunity to engage in research, enrich an existing course or create a new one, develop a musical or artistic work, broaden pedagogical expertise, and expand professional contacts. The awardee will meet with faculty colleagues and fellow artists at New York University and in New York City and will participate in activities scheduled as part of the larger Network Summer program which annually brings over 300 visiting faculty members to NYU’s Washington Square campus. In addition to accommodations and most meals, the awardee will receive a travel subvention and an honorarium of $1,000.

The application process is as follows:

Application Procedure and Eligibility

Accommodations and Meals

Internet and Library Access

Research Consultants and Orientation

How to Apply

APPLICATION PROCEDURE AND ELIGIBILITY

Several prerequisites must be met for participation in the Calvin B. Grimes Summer Scholar-in-Residence program.

  • The applicant must be a full-time faculty member at a member institution of the Faculty Resource Network. A list of current FRN institutions may be found on the Member Institutions & Institutional Representatives page.
  • The applicant must be approved and recommended by the Provost/Dean of his/her home institution for the term of the residency.
  • The proposed project must exemplify the goal of promoting pedagogical innovation on the scholar’s home campus.
  • New York University must have the resources necessary to be of substantial benefit to the applicant’s project goals.

To be considered for this award, applicants must submit to their campus Liaison Officer proposals that describe research or curricular development projects that meet the program prerequisites above. The application must also be accompanied by two letters of support from the Provost/Dean of the home institution and department chair indicating how the proposed project will benefit the home institution.

The proposal should delineate project goals (work to be completed while in residence), benefits to the applicant’s home institution, and the ways in which residence at NYU and in New York City will benefit the applicant’s research.

Applicants for the Scholar-in-Residence program should also indicate the NYU department(s) with which they wish to be associated and the name(s) of the faculty member(s) with whom they wish to work (if known). New York University bulletins may be consulted through the University’s home page at www.nyu.edu. (The Network cannot guarantee that the NYU faculty members requested by applicants will be available as Research Consultants during the month of June. If your requested consultant is unavailable, we will attempt to find a faculty member that is knowledgeable within the field you are researching.)

The applicant who is selected for this residency will receive a letter informing them of application status. If accepted into the program, the faculty scholar will receive information regarding housing accommodations, travel subvention, and honoraria as well as some general information about the program and its schedule.

For further details on prerequisites and accommodations please visit the Faculty Resource Network website.

To Apply

Please email each of the four application materials as four separate PDF attachments to develop@uvm.edu on or before February 1, 2018 (prior to the NYU deadline).

(PLEASE NOTE: While the deadline for submitting applications to NYU is February 12, 2018, your application must be signed by Sherwood Smith, Senior Executive Director for Diversity, Engagement and Professional Development, to be considered by NYU, therefore the earlier February 1st deadline.

A copy of the application can be found here: https://facultyresourcenetwork.org/programs-and-events/faculty-enrichment-seminars/network-summer/network-summer-2018/

The application packet for Network Winter seminars must include the following:

  • Application
  • Statement of intent*
  • Curriculum vitae
  • One letter of support from the Dean or Chair of your department

*The statement of intent should be a statement of at least one page in length indicating your intellectual and/or academic interests and the research or curricular development project you hope to produce as a result of participating in a network faculty enrichment seminar. Indicate specific courses or programs which will benefit your institution as a result of your participation in Network Winter. The letter of support must indicate the value of your participation in Network Winter to your school or department.

Last modified January 11 2018 09:40 AM

 
 

 

Semester Scholar-in-Residence Program

The Semester Scholar-in-Residence program allows Network faculty who are either on leave or sabbatical from their home institution to come to New York University to engage in research, develop curricula, and/or produce manuscripts for publication during the Fall or Spring semester. The program allows Scholars to explore new dimensions in their disciplines, to engage in intellectual exchange and investigate resources not available to them at their home institutions, to broaden their own pedagogical expertise, to enrich existing courses or create new ones, and to expand professional contacts. Participation in the SIR program not only enhances the faculty member’s knowledge and skills, but also significantly contributes to the intellectual environment of their home institutions as they share what they learn with their colleagues and students.

Research Consultants

Throughout their residency at the University, Scholars confer periodically with New York University faculty who serve as Research Consultants and who are both aware of the Scholar’s project and knowledgeable in their field. Each Research Consultant is able to offer collegial discussion, professional and constructive criticism, and information on New York City and NYU resources. The Network identifies each Research Consultant and provides the contact information of the Consultant during the orientation meeting. The ties that develop between Research Consultants and Network Scholars often become the basis of on-going professional relationships that last well beyond the period of direct participation in the Scholar-in-Residence program.

To Apply for Fall 2018

Fall 2018 semester: Wednesday, September 5 – Thursday, December 6, 2018

Please email each of the four application materials as four separate PDF attachments to develop@uvm.edu on or before February 1, 2018 (prior to the NYU deadline).

(PLEASE NOTE: While the deadline for submitting applications to NYU is February 12, 2018, your application must be signed by Sherwood Smith, Senior Executive Director for Diversity, Engagement and Professional Development, to be considered by NYU, therefore the earlier February 1st deadline.

A copy of the application can be found here: Semester Scholar-in-Residence Application.

The application packet for the Scholar-in-Residence Program must include the following:

  • Application
  • Statement of intent*
  • Curriculum vitae
  • One letter of support from the Dean or Chair of your department

*The statement of intent should be at least one page in length indicating your intellectual and/or academic interests and the research or curricular development project you hope to produce as a result of participating in a Network faculty enrichment seminar. Indicate specific courses or programs which will benefit your institution as a result of your participation in Network Summer. The letter of support must indicate the value of your participation in Network Summer to your school or department.

To Apply for Spring 2019

Spring 2019 semester: Wednesday, January 30 – Thursday, May 9, 2019

Please email each of the four application materials as four separate PDF attachments to develop@uvm.edu on or before September 12, 2018 (prior to the NYU deadline).

(PLEASE NOTE: While the deadline for submitting applications to NYU is September 17, 2018, your application must be signed by Sherwood Smith, Senior Executive Director for Diversity, Engagement and Professional Development, to be considered by NYU, therefore the earlier February 1st deadline.

A copy of the application can be found here: https://facultyresourcenetwork.org/programs-and-events/faculty-enrichment-seminars/network-summer/network-summer-2018/

The application packet for Network Summer seminars must include the following:

  • Application
  • Statement of intent*
  • Curriculum vitae
  • One letter of support from the Dean or Chair of your department

*The statement of intent should be at least one page in length indicating your intellectual and/or academic interests and the research or curricular development project you hope to produce as a result of participating in a Network faculty enrichment seminar. Indicate specific courses or programs which will benefit your institution as a result of your participation in Network Summer. The letter of support must indicate the value of your participation in Network Summer to your school or department. 

UVM Faculty Testimonials

Here is what UVM faculty members are saying about the FNR Programs:

Julie Roberts, Professor and Director, Linguistics Program, Department of Romance Languages & Linguistics
I would certainly recommend these opportunities to all faculty. The chance to meet and speak with faculty from other institutions about issues and topics that may (or may not) be exactly those on which you spend most of your time is not to be missed. I found the conference I attended expanded my views and knowledge on the European Union, not just in regards to language (my field) but also politics (not my field but fascinating.) Please consider taking part in the FRN offerings. They are well worth your time.

Pablo Bose, Assistant Professor, Department of Geography
Pablo Bose has participated in several different FRN programs -- he was a Scholar-in-Residence in Summer 2009 while researching immigration history in New York, he was part of a seminar on climate change politics in Spring 2010 in Puerto Rico and part of a seminar on immigration challenges in Europe during Summer 2013.  The FRN has been immensely helpful for both his teaching and research -- providing access to libraries, archives and materials, facilitating conversations and collaborations with colleagues at other institutions, and creating opportunities for new research directions.  I recommend this program wholeheartedly -- it is an invaluable resource for UVM faculty for enriching their own teaching and research.

Patricia Julien, Professor, Department of Music and Dance
I have attended four New York University Faculty Resource Network Summer Seminars.  Each has been uniquely beneficial to both my research/creative work and my teaching. The 2005 seminar “Modern Jazz and the Political Imagination” introduced me to interesting, recent scholarship on jazz as a music that has the capacity to symbolize political views and human interaction. At the time, I was putting together a new TAP class and I further investigated this body of work with my students. In 2012, I attended “New Orleans Jazz: A Metaphor for American Life.” Early jazz was a personally underexplored area in both my playing and my previous study. Through this seminar, I gained a better understanding of not just the musical features of early jazz, but also the social, economic, educational, and political aspects that influenced its development. The 2013 summer seminar “Cosmopolitanism and Pop Culture,” gave me an opportunity to address ways to help my students consider issues outside the U.S., drawing on a variety of art forms. I recently participated in the “How to Write Successful Grant Proposals” seminar and am now better equipped to write thorough and compelling grants. Unlike the professional conferences I attend in my field, these seminars provide the opportunity to hear a topic discussed from many vantage points. I have heard from faculty participants who are economists, linguists, psychologists, visual artists, journalists, political scientists, and fellow musicians all contributing our particular interpretations of the subject under discussion. The conveners, too, have all been experts at the top of their fields. It is an inspiring and edifying way to spend a week in New York.

Cynthia Reyes, Associate Professor, Middle Level Education and Literacy Education
I had the opportunity to attend the NYU Faculty Resource Network seminar “Understanding the New Europe: Economic Dilemmas and Options” in June 2014. It was my first time attending the NYU FRN program.  There are many valuable professional development opportunities at UVM including the Center for Teaching and Learning and the Writing Across the Disciplines but there is something uniquely different about attending a course that is in a large city and is attended by faculty from other higher education institutions across the country.  For me the experience was unparalleled for two reasons: networking opportunity and exposure to new content. I made new friendships during the week within my seminar and across the program with individuals who live as close as New York and as far away as Puerto Rico. It was refreshing and enlightening to reflect on my own institution through the lenses of individuals living in different parts of the country. During the weeklong seminar my new colleagues and I could share common interests, successes, as well as challenges at our various institutions. I also appreciated the opportunity to learn new content and to experience the cognitive dissonance that some students experience in our own classrooms. Although most of the participants in my seminar had degrees in Economics and Business, I not only learned a great deal from them but it was also reaffirming to learn that many appreciated the “newness” with which I interpreted the material and questions they had never thought of outside of their own discipline. The experience was intellectually stimulating, and New York City is always an exhilarating place to visit.

Tina Escaja, Professor, Romance Languages & Linguistics
One of the highlights of my professional career at UVM has been, without a doubt, the opportunity to attend programs and events organized by the Faculty Resource Network. Thanks to our connection with NYU, I have participated in two superb Faculty Enrichment Seminars in New York City and one in San Juan, Puerto Rico, all led by major specialists in their fields. This Spring I will visit NYU as a Scholar-in-Residence, which will enable me to learn and further my current research, and also to strengthen links with faculty and affiliates while living in a city that provides excitement, engagement and myriad opportunities to enhance my creative and professional work. We are very fortunate to be part of this remarkable network.

Contact Information

University of Vermont
Diversity, Engagement and Professional Development
Allen House
461 Main Street
Burlington, VT 05405

Paul Goldberg
Administrative Assistant
Ph: 802-656-5800
Email: Paul.Goldberg@uvm.edu

Sherwood Smith
Senior Executive Director for Diversity, Engagement and Professional Development
Ph:  802-656-8833
Email: Sherwood.Smith@uvm.edu

2018 FRN Poster

Applicants:

Please be mindful of UVM application deadlines and send application materials to UVM (not NYU) as explained in each UVM application description page.