Gund Graduate Fellow, PhD, Rubenstein School of Environment and Natural Resources

Jesse is a PhD student working with Taylor Ricketts in the Gund Institute for Environment. Jesse is interested in creating a better understanding of the relationship between land use change and human well-being through linking spatially-explicit ecological and economic models. His research aims to improve investments in conservation by creating a more equitable distribution of benefits of conservation and ensuring that the provision of ecosystem services is robust to changes in climate. For his dissertation, Jesse is investigating the role of Vermont’s natural ecosystems in mitigating the risk of flooding and prioritizing where protection and restoration of these areas is most needed. Prior to joining the Gund, Jesse worked with the Natural Capital Project at the University of Minnesota, where he focused on estimating the social costs of nitrogen and optimizing where to restore forest landscapes. Jesse earned his B.A. in environmental studies with a focus in community ecology and geospatial analysis from Carleton College in 2014. In his free time, Jesse enjoys long backpacking and canoeing trips, training for triathlons, and cooking with friends.

Contact

Phone:
  • 914-420-2678

Areas of Expertise and/or Research

Ecosystem services, GIS, land use change, multi-criteria decision-making, non-market valuation, spatial modeling

Education

  • BA, Environmental Studies, Carleton College

Curriculum vitae

PDF icon JesseGourevitch_CV.pdf

Publications

  • Gourevitch, J., P.L. Hawthorne, B.L. Keeler, C.R. Beatty, M. Greve, M.A. Verdone. 2016. Optimizing investments in national-scale forest landscape restoration in Uganda to maximize multiple benefits. Environmental Research Letters 11.
  • Keeler, B.L., J. Gourevitch, S. Polasky, F. Isbell, C. Tessum, J. Hill, J. Marshall. 2016. The social cost of nitrogen. Science Advances 2.
  • K.A. Johnson, B.J. Dalzell, M. Donahue, J. Gourevitch, D.L. Johnson, G.S. Karlovits, B.L. Keeler, J.T. Smith. Conservation Reserve Program (CRP) lands provide ecosystem service benefits that exceed land rental costs. Ecosystem Services 18.