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    Humans for Humankind

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    Helping people with autism spectrum disorders (ASD) develop social problem-solving skills

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    Support for speech and language difficulties associated with neurodevelopmental syndromes

Connecting Health Care, Education and Science

From cognitive function and communication patterns to hearing loss treatment and language development, our faculty-scholars engage daily in the pursuit of meaningful and impactful research with a goal to translate what we learn into new strategies and technologies for diagnosing and treating communication impairments.

On behalf of Department Chair Shelley Velleman, Ph.D., CCC-SLP, we invite you to explore the impactful opportunities here at the University of Vermont.

 

Support for speech and language difficulties associated with neurodevelopmental syndromes

Students in Dr, Velleman's lab

Dr. Shelley Velleman's research seeks to identify and remediate the motor speech, phonological and literacy difficulties associated with neurodevelopmental syndromes in children, including Down syndrome, Williams syndrome and 7q11.23 Duplication syndrome. Learn more about Dr. Velleman >>

Targeting resonance in speech sounds

Dr. Nancy Gauvin delivers a presentation

Dr. Nancy Gauvin researches therapies for excessive nasality in children’s resonance. Positive air pressure build-up against the soft palate (back of the roof of the mouth) is needed to build up pressure for oral resonance and speech sounds that are produced in the English language. Dr. Gauvin’s research points to therapies that target resonance, to improve production of oral sounds in resonance and speech. Learn more about Dr. Gauvin >>

Helping people with autism spectrum disorders (ASD) develop social problem-solving skills

Dr. Patricia Prelock working with children

Dr. Tiffany Hutchins and Dr. Patricia Prelock perform research and develop interventions to help people with autism spectrum disorders (ASD) develop social problem-solving skills. Their work reveals that social challenges among people with ASD may be rooted in deficits of “episodic memory” the ability to mentally travel back in time to remember personal experiences from a first-person viewpoint. Learn more about Dr. Hutchins and Dr. Prelock >>

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