Strands are mini-courses that occur each morning for about 2.5 - 4 hours. Institute participants attend one strand throughout the four mornings. For information on an individual strand, including required readings, click on the title of the strand. Please indicate your first, second and third strand choices on the Individual Registration Form.

PLEASE NOTE: Some strands require participation of school teams while other strands allow individual participants to register.

The strands marked as "PBIS Teams only" are designed for school teams (not individuals) that have completed certain PBIS readiness activities prior to the Institute.

The strands marked as "strand open to anyone" generally do not have pre-requisites; and may or may not require registering as a team.

It is important for your school team to carefully plan how each participant's strand choice will contribute to your team's overall implementation strategies that will be discussed during afternoon Team Time.

Strands A-D: PBIS Teams ONLY

CANCELLED! Strand A - VTPBIS Universal Training (PBIS teams only) - Presenters: VTPBIS State Trainers

VTPBIS Universal Training - CANCELLED!

VTPBIS State Team Trainers

For School Teams only

Prerequisites:

School teams must have completed these activities to be eligible to attend this training.

Description:

Eligible School Leadership Teams will be supported with content and facilitation needed to complete their PBIS School-wide Implementation Plan within a Multi-tiered System of Supports (MTSS) framework. Restorative principles will be infused in the training. Teams will prepare for PBIS roll-out to staff, students, and family members. School Leadership Teams will:

• Develop the school-wide system needed for PBIS implementation
• Finalize 3-5 positively-stated school-wide behavioral expectations
• Establish a system for acknowledging students at the individual, classroom, and school-wide levels
• Create lessons for teaching school-wide expectations
• Develop consistent practices and procedures for responding to minor and major behavior problems
• Plan a system for collecting and reporting school-wide data for use in decision-making

Who should attend?

School leadership teams consisting of representative members from the school including a building principal or assistant principal, Supervisory Union/Supervisory District coordinator and school-based PBIS coordinator.  Wondering if this strand is for you? Contact Amy Wheeler-Sutton at amy.wheeler-sutton@uvm.edu.

Pre-Readings:

(1)   Sugai, G., Horner, R.H., Algozzine, R., Barrett, S., Lewis, T., Anderson, C., Bradley, R., Choi, J. H., Dunlap, G., Eber, L., George, H., Kincaid, D., McCart, A., Nelson, M., Newcomer, L., Putnam, R., Riffel, L., Rovins, M., Sailor, W., Simonsen, B. (2010). School-wide positive behavior support: Implementers’ blueprint and self-assessment. Eugene, OR: University of Oregon. http://www.pbis.org/pbis_resource_detail_page.aspx?Type=3&PBIS_ResourceID=216

Materials:

Coming Soon!

Strand B - VTPBIS Targeted Training (PBIS teams only) - Presenters: Cortney Keene, Jeremy Tretiak, and Melissa Tappin (VTPBIS State Trainers)

VTPBIS Targeted Training

VTPBIS State Team Trainers

For PBIS School Teams only

Prerequisites:

School Teams must have completed these activities to be eligible to attend this training. PBIS Targeted Coordinators must participate in a brief orientation webinar on April 10, 2019. For more information and to register, go to: https://www.pbisvermont.org/professional-development-calendar/vtpbis-targeted-tier-2-orientation-webinar-3/.
 

Description:

School leadership teams that have implemented School-wide PBIS with fidelity are eligible to attend this strand that will provide the content and facilitation needed to prepare for implementation at the targeted level within a Multi-Tiered System of Supports. School Leadership Teams will:

• Increase knowledge and fluency about the Targeted Level of VTPBIS
• Finalize systems needed at the Targeted Level
• Complete an inventory of the formal and informal targeted supports currently available; identify gaps; and prioritize practices for implementation
• Learn about Check-In, Check-Out and Teacher Check, Connect, and Expect and plan for implementation
• Develop a foundational understanding of Functional Behavior Analysis and Universal Screening and plan to integrate this into their Targeted Level of PBIS.

Who should Attend:

School leadership teams that have implemented VTPBIS at the Universal Level and have achieved a score of 80/80 on their post-implementation SET or 70% on the most recent Tiered Fidelity Inventory (completed within the past four months) are eligible to attend this training on the Targeted Level of PBIS.

Pre-Readings:

None

Materials to be handed out at the Institute (one per team) 

  • Targeted Workbook (doc) 
  • Building Positive Behavior Support Systems in Schools: Functional Behavior Assessment by Crone & Horner
  • Responding to Problem Behavior in Schools: The Behavior Education Program by Crone, Hawken, & Horner

Other Materials:

Coming Soon!

 

 

 

Strand C - VTPBIS Intensive Training (PBIS teams only) - Presenters: Sherry Schoenberg, Ken Kramberg, Kym Asam, and Jean Haigh (VTPBIS State Trainers)

VTPBIS Intensive Training

VTPBIS State Team Trainers

For Eligible VTPBIS School Leadership Teams 

Prerequisites:

School leadership teams that have implemented PBIS at the Targeted Level and have completed these activities are eligible to attend this training. PBIS Targeted Coordinators must participate in a brief orientation webinar on April 11, 2019. For more information and to register, go to: https://www.pbisvermont.org/professional-development-calendar/vtpbis-intensive-tier-3-orientation-webinar-2/.

Description:

This training will provide the content and facilitation needed to support school teams in preparing for implementation at the Intensive Level. School Leadership teams will: 

• Refine and strengthen an Inventory of Targeted practices that can be adapted for individualized supports  
• Increase knowledge and fluency about the Intensive Level of VTPBiS
• Identify the systems functions, responsibilities, and roles at the Intensive Level
• Understand the features of individualized supports including:  

o Teaming  
o Setting Goals  
o Assessment  
o Intervention(s)
o Evaluation

o Develop strategies for building effective Behavior Support Plans 
o Explore the data systems needed to facilitate effective Behavior Support Plans

Who should attend?

VTPBIS leadership team participants should include, at a minimum, the administrator, a teacher, special educator, and staff trained in FBA.

Pre-Readings:

None

Materials:

Coming Soon!

 

Strand D - Refresher in VTPBIS Features (PBIS teams only) - Presenters: Cassandra Townshend, Kristin Beswick, and Lauralee Keach (VTPBIS State Trainers)

Refresher in VTPBIS Features

VTPBIS State Team Trainers

Prerequisites:

Teams from currently implementing VTPBIS Schools are eligible to attend this training. It is recommended that VTPBIS schools attend this strand if they are experiencing common implementation dips such as loss of momentum, low implementation fidelity, and high rates of staff and/or administrator turnover. A pre-training survey will be sent to all participants to assess individual learning and team planning needs. In addition, schools attending this strand must complete the Tiered Fidelity Inventory (TFI) and Self-Assessment Survey (SAS) no later than May 31st. For schools previously trained in PBIS that are no longer implementing PBIS, please contact your State TA to determine if this strand is the best option for your school

Description:

This strand will serve as a review of PBIS data, systems, and practices across the tiers within a Multi-Tiered System of Supports (MTSS). Participants will learn about common implementation dips and the latest practical strategies for overcoming implementation fatigue. Participants will learn how to analyze their own data for increased fidelity of implementation and improved student outcomes, develop a maintenance plan for revitalization and continuance improvement, and walk away with a “tool-kit” of strategies and skills necessary to support new staff in PBIS features. This strand will differentiate content and activities based on individual school needs and school data, and participants will have many opportunities to learn from the successes and challenges of other schools.    

Who should attend?

VTPBIS leadership teams including School Coordinator and Administrator, SU/SD Coordinator, and other staff representatives. Wondering if this strand is for you? Contact Amy Wheeler-Sutton at amy.wheeler-sutton@uvm.edu.

Pre-Readings:

Check back after May 15th.

Materials:

Coming Soon!

 

All other Strands

Strand E - Creating a Positive and Proactive Classroom to Promote Academic and Behavioral Success (teams recommended) - Presenter: Brandi Simonsen

Creating a Positive and Proactive Classroom to Support ALL Learners

Brandi Simonsen

Description:

In this strand, participants will:
• learn the critical features of evidence-based practices in classroom management to support all learners and promote academic and behavioral success,
• discuss strategies to intensify practices to support learners with more intense needs,
• develop an action plan to improve implementation fidelity of these practices in a classroom with which they are familiar, and
• discuss data and systems that need to be in place to support classroom management within a classroom or school.

Strand Objectives:

Specifically, after attending this strand, participants will be able to:
1. Describe the critical features of positive and proactive classroom practices to support all students (Classroom Behavior Support Practices) and provide examples of each practice appropriate to their school context (e.g., grade level, ability level).
2. Discuss strategies to intensify practices to support learners with more intense needs.
3. Discuss various approaches to assess and support teachers’ implementation of positive and proactive classroom behavior support, complete a classroom management assessment, and develop an action plan to increase the fidelity with which evidence-based practices are implemented in a classroom (Classroom Data and Systems).

Who should attend:

Classroom teachers who want to improve their classroom management practices.  While not required, it is recommended that individuals attend as a team with someone else from their school.

Pre-Readings:

Materials:

Coming Soon!

Bio:

Dr. Brandi Simonsen is an associate professor of Special Education with tenure in the Department of Educational Psychology at the Neag School of Education and a Co-Director of the Center for Behavioral Education and Research (CBER; www.cber.org) at the University of Connecticut. She is a partner of the National Technical Assistance Center on Positive Behavior Interventions and Supports (PBIS; www.pbis.org). Dr. Simonsen is currently the Vice President of the Association for Positive Behavior Support (www.apbs.org).  In addition, Dr. Simonsen serves as an associate editor for the Journal of Positive Behavioral Interventions.

Currently, Dr. Simonsen conducts research, publishes, teaches, and provides training/technical assistance in the areas of (a) school- and class-wide PBIS, (b) positive and proactive professional development supports for teachers, and (c) applications of PBIS in alternative education settings.  In addition, Dr. Simonsen coordinates UConn’s Graduate Certificate Program in School-wide Positive Behavior Support.

Before joining the faculty at University of Connecticut in 2005, Dr. Simonsen was the director of a non-public (alternative) school for students with disabilities, who presented with challenging educational and behavioral needs. In addition to serving as an administrator and clinician, Dr. Simonsen has previously been certified as a teacher of elementary general education and middle-secondary special education.

FULL! Strand F - Getting Started with a Whole School Approach to Restorative Practices (strand open to anyone) - Presenters: Annie O'Shaughnessy and Chris Palmer

Restorative Practices Foundations and Implementation - FULL!

Annie O'Shaughnessy and Chris Palmer

Description:

A restorative approach to building community and responding to harm in schools has been linked to improved school climate, greater school connectedness, increased student attendance, improved test scores, increased graduation rates, reduced discipline referrals, reductions in violent and serious incidents, and decreases in punitive and exclusionary discipline responses. Strand participants will be introduced to and actively explore the what, why, and how of the restorative approach at a personal, classroom, and school-wide level. At the universal level, restorative practices (RP) focus on building and strengthening relationships in order to create a classroom and school culture where everyone feels a sense of safety, belonging, respect, and equal voice. When harm has been done, RP leverages these qualities to: a.) provide support and space for those harmed to feel heard and healed, and; b.) support community members in taking responsibility for their actions without shame so they can repair the harm in meaningful ways that lead to learning and growth. Finally, the restorative approach is a framework within which SEL, mindfulness, trauma-informed teaching, and equity can be practiced and supported. While not providing an exhaustive training, this strand intends to position participants to lead a school wide shift towards a more restorative community. Led by a high school classroom teacher turned consultant and co-led by a PBIS, prek-6 assistant principal, participants will hear a broad perspective on its use and implementation across the grade levels.

Who should attend:

This strand is recommended not only for pre-K through 12 educators who desire a comprehensive introduction to the restorative approach and practices in order to lead school change, but also for teachers who wish to use the restorative approach to transform their own classrooms. No prior experience is needed. Those familiar with use of the restorative approach will have ample opportunities to share their experience and knowledge in small groups and develop a deeper understanding.

Pre-Readings:

Check back after May 15th

Materials:

Coming Soon!

Bios:

Annie O’Shaughnessy’s dedication to Restorative Practices began with her experiences with circle work beginning 20 years ago. Having participated in and led circles personally and professionally since the 90s around the country and in the classroom, she has witnessed the tremendous impact of these experiences on her own and other’s lives and the essential role mindfulness plays in successful restorative work. Currently, she teaches English half-time at the Center for Technology, Essex, teaches Mindfulness and Restorative Practices courses for educators through CVEDC, and trains educators in schools throughout the state. Annie is passionately committed to supporting teachers and schools in creating more mindful and restorative learning communities. The 180+ hours of clinical training she has received as a teacher at the Centerpoint School alongside 80 hours of training in RJ and an M.Ed in Mindfulness for Educators has prepared her well to be of benefit to students, teachers, and schools as they work to meet the challenges facing them.

Chris Palmer  - After spending four years as a seventh and eighth grade science teacher, in 2016 Chris became assistant principal of Highgate Elementary School. Chris has worked to revive a tiered approach to social-emotional-behavioral supports using PBIS. Since the middle of last school year, they've been slowly implementing components of Restorative Practices -- first with staff and then with students -- building toward school-wide implementation in the 2019-2020 school year.

FULL! Strand G - Deepening and Expanding Restorative Practices within a Multi-Tiered System of Supports (strand open to anyone) - Presenters: Jon Kidde and Amy Wheeler-Sutton

Deepening and Expanding Restorative Practices within a Multi-Tiered System of Supports - FULL!

Jon Kidde and Amy Wheeler-Sutton

Description:

For over a decade, Vermont schools have been building a multi-tiered system of supports (MTSS) framework for social and academic achievement. While over half of VT schools currently implement PBIS, others use different strategies for creating a multi-tiered framework to support students’ social/emotional/behavioral success. Recently, there has been a surge of interest around the use of restorative approaches nationally and in Vermont schools.

A restorative approach involves principle-based processes and practices that can be applied to help things go right, as well as respond when things go wrong. This whole-school approach links well within the Multi-Tiered System of Support (MTSS) framework.

This advanced strand is intended for school teams looking to dig deeper into restorative practices and to explore the integration and alignment of a restorative approach within the MTSS framework at the systems level.

Through active participation and using the opportunities to apply course content to their schools, upon completion, participants will:

• Recall current understanding of restorative approaches and MTSS
• Define restorative practices and MTSS in their own words
• Deepen their knowledge of restorative approaches
• View policies and practices through a new lens and notice ways to apply a restorative approach to an MTSS framework
• Design and facilitate a Tier I circle process
• Consider fidelity and outcomes measures to assess progress toward goals
• Connect to a community of colleagues who are exploring and working to integrate restorative approaches and MTSS
• Use implementation strategies to develop action steps for integrating restorative principles and practices within a MTSS in the schools where they work

Who Should Attend:

This advanced strand is intended for school teams looking to dig deeper into restorative practice and to explore the integration and alignment of a restorative approach within the MTSS framework at the systems level. Participants/teams must have already attended introductory training in restorative practices.

Pre-Readings:

Whole School Restorative Approach Resource Guide

Materials:

Coming Soon!

Bio:

Jon Kidde has been exploring the concepts of restorative justice (RJ) for 20 years. Currently, he is an independent consultant focused on restorative justice and justice reform. He has played a critical role in the design, application, and enhancement of RJ within diverse settings. Jon co-authored Restorative Justice: A Working Guide for Our Schools with Rita Alfred in 2011. He is called upon to assist schools in their implementation of restorative approaches.

Amy Wheeler-Sutton is the Training and Development Coordinator for the Vermont BEST/PBIS State Team. Before joining the State Team, she was a school counselor at The Conservatory Lab Charter School in Boston, MA. Prior to that, she was school counselor for three years at the Dothan Brook School in White River Junction, a PBIS Exemplar School. As Training and Development Coordinator at Vermont PBIS, Amy is responsible for designing and delivering PBIS trainings. She also plays a lead role in the annual evaluation of VTPBIS.

Strand H - The Art of Kid Whispering; Reaching the Inside Kid (strand open to anyone) - Presenter: Mark Freado

The Art of Kid Whispering; Reaching the Inside Kid

Mark Freado

Description:

These sessions will address the developing capacity of care-givers to communicate with young people in ways that promote understanding, cooperation and trust. The most effective communication skill is listening. The Art of Kid Whispering involves skills to recognize and infer meaning and needs in the communication of a young person and to be able to respond in ways that address the essential elements in that communication. Many important elements of communication occur beyond or beneath language. The ability to listen around words that are spoken using visual and other auditory cues is critical to effectively communicating with young people who need support and guidance by caring adults.

Who should attend:

Anyone engaging with kids from kindergarten through seniors.

Pre-readings:

Materials:

Coming Soon!

Bio:

Mark Freado is founder and Director Growing Edge Training Associates of Westerville, Ohio.  He has been Director of the International Training Network for CF Learning, a program of Cal Farley’s in Amarillo, Texas. Freado’s 40-year professional career encompasses contributions to the mental health field, public education, social services, program development, leadership, consultation, and training. He is a master trainer of Life Space Crisis Intervention (LSCI) and has trained more people in this skill-based course than anyone in the world. He is the co-creator of training, The Art of Kid Whispering: Reaching the Inside Kid. Freado is also a senior trainer of Planning Restorative Outcomes: Transforming Assessment, a senior trainer of Three Pillars of Transforming Care: Helping Kids Who Hurt, and a certified trainer of Situational
Leadership II with the Ken Blanchard Company. He has worked with private providers, public agencies, and schools throughout the United States as well as Canada, Europe, Australia, South Africa, and Asia, speaking, consulting, and delivering training services. He specializes in program development, leadership skills, and interventions for at-risk and disadvantaged children, adolescents, and their families. Freado holds a master’s degree in Forensic Psychology from the Chicago School of Professional Psychology, and a master’s degree in Counseling from West Virginia University.
 

Strand I - What makes engagement, engagement? (strand open to anyone) - Presenter: Loui Lord Nelson

What Makes Engagement, Engagement?

Loui Lord Nelson

Description:

Researchers tell us that when students are within an engaging environment, they are more deeply involved in learning that is supportive of their social, emotional, and behavioral needs. They are also more available to access and absorb academic content. But what does an engaging environment look like? How do you create one? And how do you know whether or not learners are benefitting from these strategies? This strand will use Universal Design for Learning (UDL) as an organizing framework to identify how we can attend to the social, emotional, and behavioral needs of our variable learners. During this strand, participants will:
1. Increase their knowledge of engagement, as defined by the UDL framework.
2. Participate in activities linked to the engagement principle.
3. Establish a plan to bring more engagement into their lessons.
4. Identify a variety of strategies, tools, and structures to design lessons for the variable needs of students.

Who should attend?

Elementary through high school classroom educators

Pre-Readings:

None

Materials:

Coming Soon!

Bio:

Loui Lord Nelson, Ph.D., is the UDL Specialist for the Schoolwide Integrated Framework for Transformation (SWIFT) Center. She is also an educational consultant whose work focuses on Universal Design for Learning (UDL). A former special education teacher, she is a member of CAST's cadre, has been an invited facilitator at the Harvard UDL Institute, provides guidance in UDL to schools, districts, state personnel, and universities across the globe, and is the author of the top selling book, Design and Deliver: Planning and Teaching Using Universal Design for Learning.

Strand J - Youth Mental Health First Aid and Understanding Compassion Fatigue (strand open to anyone) - Presenter: Lance Metayer

Youth Mental Health First Aid and Understanding Compassion Fatigue

Lance Metayer

Description:

This strand will support participant learning in Youth Mental Health First Aid and Understanding Compassion Fatigue. Youth Mental Health First Aid is a training program that introduces educators to the unique risk factors and warning signs of mental health problems in students grades 5 - 12, builds understanding of the importance of early intervention, and teaches educators strategies for how to help a student in crisis or experiencing a mental health challenge. Youth Mental Health First Aid uses role-playing and simulations to demonstrate how to assess a mental health crisis; learn interventions to provide initial help; and connect young people to professional, peer, social, and self-help care.  Participants will increase their confidence in approaching and supporting students who are experiencing a mental health challenge or crisis, learn strategies and skills to support students in the classroom and will increase their understanding of Vermont’s statewide mental health system, available mental health interventions, and crisis resources available throughout the state.  Additionally, this strand will explore the impact of vicarious trauma and compassion fatigue and its impact on educators, students, and the school community.  Educators will engage in discussions and activities that support their understanding of the warning signs of compassion fatigue, its impact, and strategies to support themselves and their educational teams to create healthy and positive classrooms and school communities.

This strand will provide educators with a three-year Youth Mental Health First Aid certification awarded by the National Council of Behavioral Health.

Who Should Attend:

Educators, para professionals, special educators and administrators supporting students 5-12.

Pre-Readings:

None

Materials:

Coming Soon!

Bio:

Lance Metayer has spent the last twelve years working with youth and families who have been impacted by developmental trauma and chronic stress.  Lance is a Licensed Clinical Mental Health Counselor and the team leader of School Based Clinical Services at Northwestern Counseling and Support.  Through his work he oversees a team of mental health clinicians providing therapy to children and adolescents in schools throughout Franklin and Grand Isle County. In addition Lance is the Statewide Project Coordinator for Community FIRST, a SAMHSA grant which has developed a statewide network of Youth/Adult Mental Health First Aid instructors to provide Y/MHFA training to educators, foster parents, and community members throughout the state. Lance is passionate about providing mental health education to reduce mental health stigma, increase early intervention, and to improve social conditions for individuals impacted by mental illness.

Strand K - Start Where You Are: Developing and Strengthening SEL Implementation (teams only) - Presenter: Rebecca Lallier

Start Where You Are: Developing and Strengthening SEL Implementation

Rebecca Lallier

Description:

Research indicates that social emotional learning (SEL) is linked with academic achievement, improved attendance, and reduction of problem behaviors. Participants will learn how to take a multi-tiered, systems approach (including PBIS) to social-emotional learning; examine SEL competencies, standards, and proficiencies; explore the SEL planning, implementation, and improvement process; and investigate evidence-based practices and programs for K-12 students, including stand-alone and content-area integration models that lead to social and academic success. Strategies for increasing buy-in, supporting adult SEL, collaborating with colleagues, addressing barriers, engaging families in SEL, and data-based decision-making will be explored. Examples of SEL practices in action will be highlighted.

Who should attend?

This strand is appropriate for school teams that are interested in initiating or expanding SEL implementation at their school. Team planning time is built into the strand, so it is preferable to have more than one person from a team attend this strand together.

Pre-Readings:

None

Materials:

Coming Soon!

Bio:

Rebecca Lallier is a school counselor and PBIS coordinator at the Dothan Brook School in White River Junction, Vermont and an Implementation Coach and Trainer for Vermont PBIS. Dothan Brook has been recognized as a RAMP School of Distinction by the American School Counselor Association and as an Exemplar School by Vermont PBIS. Rebecca was named a 2017 National School Counselor of the Year Finalist.

 

Strand L - Creating Trauma Responsive School Communities & Fostering Resilient Learners (strand open to anyone) - Presenter: Joelle van Lent

Creating Trauma Responsive School Communities & Fostering Resilient Learners

Joelle van Lent

Description:

This strand is designed from current research on the key components and protective factors that foster resilience in children who are contending with a wide variety of stressors including developmental trauma, mental health challenges, intellectual and learning variations, developmental disabilities, and chronic adversity within their environment.  Dr. van Lent will identify essential elements and approaches for creating environments in which children can thrive.

Learning Objectives:

1. Participants will learn about various forms of stress and current research relevant to fostering resilience in children.  The training will focus on the protective factors and key elements that improve a child’s ability to prevail in context of ongoing stressors of a wide variety.
2. Participants will explore the impact of chronic exposure to trauma on child development, specifically focusing on attachment capacity, neurological functioning, affect regulation, and identity formation.
3. Participants will learn strategies and interventions that foster the development of essential skills that improve a child’s engagement and functioning.  The training focuses on the realms of relational health, emotional regulation, social competency, and executive functioning.  An emphasis is placed on the use of co-regulation as a tool to de-escalate students and improve their ability to regulate.  Specific examples and modeling of such skill development will be included.  Several case examples are offered.
4. Participants will develop an understanding of the concepts of Compassion Fatigue and Compassion Satisfaction, as well as increased awareness of the associated risk factors and environmental vulnerabilities.  Participants will be actively engage in developing ideas for self-care and effective professional collaboration.
5. Participants will learn strategies and obtain resources to effectively collaborate with community partners and engage parents in the school community.  The overarching goal is to create system-wide change and improved resilience for the students, school community, families, and the community in which the students live.  Participants will be effective agents of change and positive influence through knowledge learned in this course to engage successfully, advocate effectively, and share information in ways that offer validation and positive change.

    Who Should Attend:

    Educators, administrators, special educators, speech and language
    pathologists, occupational therapists, physical therapists, paraprofessionals, behavioral
    interventionists, and school counselors serving children and families in Vermont Schools.
    Any level of prior training is accepted.

    Pre-readings:

    "National Scientific Council on the Developing Child. (2015). Supportive Relationships and Active Skill-Building" Strengthen the Foundations of Resilience: Working Paper 13. Retrieved from www.developingchild.harvard.edu

    National Scientific Council on the Developing Child. (2018). Understanding Motivation: Building the Brain Architecture That Supports Learning, Health, and Community Participation: Working Paper No. 14. Retrieved from www.developingchild.harvard.edu

    Materials:

    Coming Soon!

    Bio:

    Dr. Joelle van Lent is a licensed psychologist with over 20 years of experience working with children, families, and child serving agencies.  Dr. van Lent has expertise as a therapist, clinician, evaluator, consultant, and trainer.  Her work focuses on child and adolescent mental health, family therapy, trauma, and Autism Spectrum Disorder.  Dr. van Lent’s approach is geared toward fostering resilience and creating communities that support healthy development.  She is currently in private practice based in the northwestern part of Vermont and works across the state with schools and agencies.

     

    Strand M - Mitigating Bias in our Schools and Uncovering Unconscious Biases (strand open to anyone) - Presenter: Rhiannon M. Kim

    Mitigating Bias in our Schools and Uncovering Unconscious Biases

    Rhiannon M. Kim

    Description:

    This strand will support participants in building and/or deepening their understanding of unconscious biases, the impacts of biases, and strategies for reducing the harmful impacts in our schools and in our communities. Participants will be given language and frameworks for engaging in and leading conversations around bias as it relates to race, gender, socio-economic status, disability status, and other aspects of identity/the impact on marginalized populations with colleagues and with students.

    During this strand, participants will learn:

    • Strategies for understanding and staying with the discomfort that can arise from these conversations.
    • Methods for linking these new practices to systems already in place: PBIS, Restorative Practices, Responsive Classrooms, SEL Curriculum, etc.
    • Personal practices and classroom practices will be introduced, taught, and practiced.
    • Creating school environments that support student social-emotional development and health.
    • Teaching how to utilize meeting and classroom agreements to foster engaged learners.
    • Examples of these practices happening in classrooms and in other contexts Pre/post assessment measures to look at skill growth and acquisition.
    • Using narrative data and SWIS data to track progress and target areas of growth.

    Pre-readings:

    Who should attend

    This strand is suitable for all grade levels and levels of experience


    Materials:

    Coming Soon!

    Bio:

    Rhiannon M. Kim is a licensed Speech Language Pathologist and 500-hour yoga instructor working on the interdisciplinary Clinical Team in the South Burlington School District. She is currently serving on the Diversity, Equity, and Inclusion Committee in SBSD. In the Fall of 2019, she will begin the Educational Leadership and Policy Studies - Ed. D. program at the University of Vermont. She currently teaches both at the University of Vermont; a D2 Course blending mindfulness practices with understanding bias and the implications of systemic issues of racism, sexism, and other-isms, as well as courses through Saint Michael’s College: Mindfulness Based Practices for Educators. Her areas of study include: Social-Emotional Learning, Diversity, Equity & Inclusion, Systems-Lens, and supporting the social and emotional health of educators. Rhiannon draws on professional development experiences as well as personal experiences of growing up in Vermont as a multi-racial Korean-American.

    Strand N - Leveraging your Multi-tiered System of Supports (MTSS) to Achieve Better Outcomes for All Students (teams only) - Presenters: Tracy Watterson and Tom Faris

    Leveraging your Multi-tiered System of Supports (MTSS) to Achieve Better Outcomes for All Students

    Tracy Watterson and Tom Faris

    Description:

    This strand will offer focused support for teams that are interesting in using a self-assessment of their system to inform action planning.  These four days on technical assistance could be the beginning of systems work through the upcoming school year.  The revised Field Guide will be one of the many resources used to support teams during this strand.

    Who should attend

    SU Leadership Teams or School Teams including an administrator.


    Materials:

    Expanding and Strengthening Best-Practice Supports for Students Who Struggle (DMG 2017)

    VTmtss Field Guide 2019 (available soon)

    Bio:

    Tracy Watterson has been an educator since 1986, serving children as a K-5 teacher, para-educator, interventionist, and math specialist in Missouri, Washington, and Virginia.  For the past four years, she has worked at the Vermont Agency of Education (AOE) as the Elementary Mathematics Assessment Coordinator & SWIFT SEA Co-Coordinator providing professional learning in Vermont and presenting workshops to the math community at national conferences throughout the US. Tracy is currently the Multi-tiered System of Supports Program Manager at the Agency of Education.

    Tom Faris has worked as an educator in Vermont since 1978. He has been a special educator in specialized programs as well as public schools. He became a school administrator in 2000, first at Missisquoi Valley Union High School, then Essex High School. He has worked at the Vermont Agency of Education as a Multi-Tiered System of Supports Coordinator since July 2017.