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The TESOL Certificate provides students with theoretical background and practical training in this teaching field. As the demands for English language teaching grow both in the U.S. and abroad, there is a rising increase in the need for trained teachers of English. 

The Teaching English to Speakers of Other Languages (TESOL) Certificate provides undergraduate students with a foundation in the approaches, methods, and techniques in teaching English to speakers of other languages, paired with a solid understanding of the theories of second language acquisition that underlie and motivate classroom practices. The program prepares future ESL teachers and others working with second language learners for classroom experiences with students in a variety of teaching contexts, with a specific focus on adult learners in the U.S.

TESOL Certificate Program of Study

The TESOL Certificate Program comprises the following courses, the first four of which offer theoretical background in linguistics and second language acquisition, cross-cultural  understanding, and approaches and methods in teaching English as a second language.

LING 080 Introduction to Linguistics 3.0 credits
LING 170 TESOL and Applied Linguistics 3.0 credits
LING 177 Second Language Acquisition 3.0 credits
LING 270 Techniques and Procedures in ESL 4.0 credits

 

 

 

 

 

Students may choose between the following two courses:

EDTE 057 U.S. Citizenship and Education 3.0 credits
LING 081 Structure of English Language 3.0 credits

Please note: No more than 6 credits may overlap between the TESOL certificate and the ELL Endorsement (CESS).

TESOL Certificate Program Co-Directors:
  • Maeve Eberhardt, Assistant Professor, Romance Languages & Linguistics

  • Guillermo Rodríguez, Associate Professor, Romance Languages & Linguistics

Participating Faculty:
  • Julie Roberts, Professor, Romance Languages & Linguistics (College of Arts and Sciences)

  • Cynthia Reyes, Associate Professor, Secondary Education (College of Education and Social Services)

  • Barri Tinkler, Assistant Professor, Secondary Education (College of Education and Social Services)

  • Karen Vatz, Lecturer, Romance Languages & Linguistics (College of Arts and Sciences)