Classroom

TAP is a writing-intensive elective program for first-year students in the College of Arts and Sciences that combines an interactive course environment with careful academic advising. In the fall semester, students enroll in one TAP seminar on a topic of common interest. TAP seminars encourage students to approach major issues from a variety of points of view by developing creative projects and expressing what they learned through speech and writing. The professor, who also serves as an academic advisor, helps further explore a student's interests and academic goals. All TAP seminars satisfy the University's Writing and Information Literacy Requirement and many also satisfy one of the College’s Distribution Requirements (Fine Arts, Humanities, Natural Science, or Social Science).

Fall 2021 Teacher-Advisor Program (TAP) Seminars

Arts & Sciences Interdisciplinary

Arts & Sciences Interdisciplinary

AS 095 A Gender & Race in Contemporary Latin America
Instructor: Ernesto Ebratt

This course uses the theme of globalization and identity as a lens to explore gender and race issues in Latin America and the Caribbean. Three countries, Mexico, Colombia, and the Dominican Republic, will be utilized as case studies to explore: 1) gender and labor in the maquiladora industry on the U.S./Mexico border; 2) problematic gender relations in drug trafficking in Colombia; and 3) the paradox of (in)visibility: Haitian migration to the Dominican Republic. Through an analysis of these issues, students will learn about historical and contemporary power relations in these regions of the world, will make connections between them, and draw correlations to similar issues affecting Latinos, African Americans, and women in the United States.
Requirements Satisfied: Foundational Writing and Information Literacy (FWIL)
 

 

 

Fine Arts

Art & Art History

ARTH 095 A —Why Build That?
Instructor: William Mierse

Ever wondered why architects make the decisions that they do? Why did someone build that building in that manner? This is a course that helps you find some of the answers to those questions. Along the way you get the chance to learn how to formulate the questions, explore the formal aspects of buildings, develop research strategies for pursuing other aspects of the building’s history, use primary source materials, critique secondary sources, and develop your own interpretation of why a building was built like that. This is a discussion based, seminar style course. At every meeting we discuss some aspect of architecture that you have begun to examine on your own either through assigned readings, video viewing, or independent research. This is a course that functions only when everyone participates. Sometimes the participation is in the form of discussions, sometimes group presentations, and sometimes individual presentations. There is lots of analytical writing, and the assignments take a variety of different forms from critiques of videos and presentations, to formal letter writing, to research papers.
Requirements Satisfied: Foundational Writing and Information Literacy (FWIL) and Fine Arts or Humanities
 

ARTS 001 A —Drawing
Instructor: Jane Kent

Drawing is the basic form of visualization and is fundamental to all art making no matter the style or form. Traditionally it has been used in relationship with observation to record the world around us. Contemporary uses of drawing include working abstractly as a means of recording and expanding ideas, concepts and plans. All the facets of drawing are introduced and discussed. Students will have a broad introduction to all the uses of drawing as well as opportunity to practice skills needed to develop art ideas. The class functions as a laboratory for experimentation and practice. We will have group and individual critiques. Students will learn how to describe what they are observing. This is a TAP class and therefore writing will be a component of our class. Students will learn how to write about art, write reviews and descriptive pieces. We will address methods of evaluating the work of others as well as how to address one’s own developing work.
Requirements Satisfied: Foundational Writing and Information Literacy (FWIL) and Fine Arts
 

ARTS 012 A —Perspectives on Art Making
Instructor: Cameron Davis

Perspectives on Making introduces contemporary art practice; exploring the hands-on making, presenting and analyzing of art works in a variety of media and formats that can include assignments in 2-d, 3-d, and installation. Students will explore the relationships between methods and meanings and the role of experimentation in art making. The translation of experience into artistic form, and the value of diligence, persistence, and iterative making, will be major themes of the course.
Requirements Satisfied: Foundational Writing and Information Literacy (FWIL) and Fine Arts
 

ARTS 095 A —Wheel Throwing
Instructor: Hoyt Barringer

“In just taking an apple from the tree, and eating the whole thing, there are no mistakes to be made.” - Shoji Hamada In this course, the potter’s wheel is used as the primary forming process for making functional and sculptural stoneware pieces. Students will gain considerable experience with process and materials developing the necessary skills and competence to connect the hand and eye with the heart and mind. What constitutes a well thrown form technically and sculpturally? How do we determine proper proportion, form and function? Visual, tactile and historical possibilities are explored using stoneware clay, slips, oxides and glazes high-fired in a gas kiln. During the course of the semester, students are required to work independently to demonstrate their command of various forms and techniques set forth in the course syllabus. Students will be required to conceive of a cohesive body of work for a final project that exhibits developed skills and an ability to think analytically and creatively.
Requirements Satisfied: Foundational Writing and Information Literacy (FWIL) and Fine Arts
 

 

Dance

DNCE 001 A —Dance in the Contemporary World
Instructor: Paula Higa

This course examines contemporary dance from a global perspective. Students will uncover the language of contemporary choreographers encompassing influences from the past. This examination will occur through extensive readings, writing, video observation, group presentation, and practical/creative experiential learning.
Requirements Satisfied: Foundational Writing and Information Literacy (FWIL) and Fine Arts
 

 

Theatre

THE 095 A —Broadway Costume & Design
Instructor: Martin Thaler

Do you know anyone who you would trust to go into your closet, and choose something for you to wear, every day, for every different occasion you encountered? That’s what a Costume Designer has do for every character they create in every production they design. Designing costumes for the Theater is like going on a journey back in time to a place where you can create an an entire world of your own imagination, or choose to strictly adhere to one that has already existed. In this class you will sit next to many Broadway designers at their drawing tables as they are planing for a production that may need to look exactly like a time and place that existed in history, or for one that is of their own making. You’ll learn to understand how the elements and principles of design are used to manipulate the audience’s emotional responses to the characters before they even say a word of dialogue. The thing that never changes on this journey is the fact that a costume is the strongest visual statement of who a character is and what they stand for. This course will explore many different styles of design for a variety of productions that range from Broadway Musicals, to Shakespeare, to Contemporary Realism, to The Theatre of the Absurd. You will learn to view research as a treasure hunt for essential information that allows you to decide on preliminary and final choices for design decisions; and will learn to understand how the social, economic, religious, political, and geographic environments of the character all play a role in defining what the character takes out of their closet to wear for every occasion they encounter in the play. While this process leans heavily on Fashion History, it is a world apart and completely different than Fashion Design. Come explore it, and see what your clothing is saying about you!
Requirements Satisfied: Foundational Writing and Information Literacy (FWIL) and Fine Arts
 

THE 095 A —Intro to Theatre
Instructor: Sara Nelson

This course is a broad introduction to theatre and the various aspects of how it is created. We will explore theatre both as an art form and as a practical craft. Using plays read in class and live performance, we will cover: Theater history and contemporary forms, the role of the audience in theatrical performance, the role of the actor and director in theatrical production, the artistry and craft of technical theatre, theater of different cultures, the importance and relevance of theatre in present day, and using theatre as a tool for social change.
Requirements Satisfied: Foundational Writing and Information Literacy (FWIL) and Fine Arts
 

 

 

Humanities

Asian Languages and Literature

JAPN 095 A —Japanese Popular Culture & Globalization
Instructor: Kyle Ikeda

Over the past two decades anime, manga, video games, toys, J-pop music, and horror movies, among other cultural and consumer products from Japan, have garnered a larger presence in the American, as well as global, popular culture scene. What are some of the reasons for this increased interest? In what ways has the age of globalization and increasing digital media flows altered the way fans of Japanese culture communicate with each other across national borders? What accounts for differences in how anime and collectible items such as Hello Kitty accessories have been marketed in the US as opposed to Japan? Through the course readings and discussions, we will examine these and other questions concerning Japanese popular culture in the age of globalization. Students will be introduced to key concepts and questions concerning Japanese popular culture global flows and be given the opportunity to apply insights gained through course readings, lectures, and discussions to a Japanese popular culture research project of their own design.
Requirements Satisfied: Foundational Writing and Information Literacy (FWIL) and Humanities
 

 

Classics

CLAS 095 A —The Mask of Dionysus
Instructor: Jessica Evans

Theater festivals, such as those in honor of the gender fluid god, Dionysus, were an essential part of life in ancient Greece. In this course we will explore ancient Greece through the world of tragedy and comedy. In addition to marking the passage of time, festivals and plays were essential to community development and identity, in particular gender identities. In addition to exploring the origins of Greek tragedy and comedy, we will examine how authors address tensions within the community, and the ways tensions were expressed through gender and sexuality. Authors which will be read include Aeschylus, Sophocles, Euripides, Aristophanes, and Menander.
Requirements Satisfied: Foundational Writing and Information Literacy (FWIL) and Humanities
 

 

English

ENGS 005 A —Gender, Sexuality, & Identity in American Poetry
Instructor: Eve Alexandra

In this introduction to American poetry special consideration will be given to poets/poetic movements seeking to establish, interrogate, and complicate identity through the lens of gender and sexuality. We will explore representations of the body in the expanded canon of American poetry from 1855 from to the present. This is a literature class with a creative writing component. Students will practice and develop their own individual poetic voice as they use creativity to think critically about gender, sexuality, and identity. Grades will be based on participation, presentations, and writing assignments.
Requirements Satisfied: Foundational Writing and Information Literacy (FWIL) and Literature
 

ENGS 005 B —Writers at Work
Instructor: Susanmarie Harrington

Our seminar cultivates curiosity and conversation about writing, emphasizing habits of mind and peer engagement. We'll read and write non-fiction; we’ll research, we'll build a culture of productive peer feedback, we’ll explore how writers’ curiosities get readers interested, and how writers create and use good feedback.
Requirements Satisfied: Foundational Writing and Information Literacy (FWIL) and Humanities
 

ENGS 005 C & E —Harry Potter
Instructor: Holly Painter

You've read Harry Potter for fun. Now read the series again as a literary text and a springboard to writing and thoughtful discussion with classmates. All seven books in one semester. All houses welcome.
Requirements Satisfied: Foundational Writing and Information Literacy (FWIL) and Literature
 

ENGS 005 D —Anatomy of Short Story
Instructor: Deborah Noel

We’ll be studying short stories from the earliest examples of the modern form to contemporary works. Course work involves reading (the stories and supplemental texts), live discussion with peers, and various kinds of writing (response posts, two shorter drafted essays and a longer drafted final research project).
Requirements Satisfied: Foundational Writing and Information Literacy (FWIL) and Literature
 

ENGS 005 F & G —The Danger of a Single Story
Instructor: Sarah Turner

This course investigates how what we read determines how we see the world. We will read a variety of contemporary texts written by and about non-hegemonic groups living in the US today that explore the intersections of race, class, socioeconomics, racism and institutionalized racism. The course will include a service-learning component.
Requirements Satisfied: Foundational Writing and Information Literacy (FWIL) and Literature
 

ENGS 005 H —Classic Monsters
Instructor: Sarah Alexander

Why do we keep remaking certain monsters? Why does Frankenstein’s monster still inhabit our imaginations more than 200 years after Mary Shelley first imagined him? Why does the story of Dracula continue to multiply in film and television? British writers of the nineteenth century created some of the most memorable and enduring monsters—Frankenstein's monster, Mr. Hyde, Dracula. In this course we will think about the ways that monsters suggest conceptions of identity and difference, self and other. We will think about how different forms of monstrosity reflect a culture’s anxieties, fears, values, and desires. We will consider how notions about monstrosity are related to attitudes toward technology, scientific discovery, race, national identity, gender, and sexuality.
Requirements Satisfied: Foundational Writing and Information Literacy (FWIL) and Literature
 

ENGS 005 I —King Arthur
Instructor: James Williamson

In this course students will follow the development of the Arthurian legends in literary works and history, and we will watch a couple of films (yes, we will watch Monty Python and the Holy Grail!). Course goals and objectives include, 1) to become familiar with the early works which served to define the legends as they come down to us from the medieval period, 2) to explore the themes (quest, love, etc.) which have characterized the legends, and 3) to examine how subsequent periods up to modernity have "re-invented" the Arthurian legends to reflect their own concerns. In addition to the reading, course work will include writing will ranging from informal personal response to a final research based essay exploring a particular theme, character or author.
Requirements Satisfied: Foundational Writing and Information Literacy (FWIL) and Literature
 

ENGS 005 J —Native American Literature
Instructor: James Williamson

In this course we will read a variety of works by Native American authors. Works will range from A Son of the Forest (1829), an autobiography by Pequot William Apess and the first book published by a Native writer, to narratives drawn from oral tradition, to Tommy Orange’s recent There There (2018), a novel centered on the contemporary urban Native community in Oakland California. Course goals and objectives include, a) to explore the works of Native authors from different backgrounds and different time periods, b) to follow themes centered on socio-political and cultural context, including the dynamics of external expectations and self identity, c) to explore how these themes develop over time.
In addition to the reading, course work will include writing will ranging from informal personal response to a final research based essay exploring a particular theme, character or author.
Requirements Satisfied: Foundational Writing and Information Literacy (FWIL) and Literature
 

 

History

HST 095 A —Women's History
Instructor: Melanie Gustafson

This seminar provides an introduction to American women’s political and social activism from the nineteenth century to today. It begins with an examination of the anti-slavery and women’s rights movements before the Civil War, continues with a focus on the struggle for the right to vote and the subsequent battles for political inclusion, and culminates with a discussion of the rise of global feminism. The course is designed to introduce students to important leaders and their ideas, the evolution of movements for equal rights and social justice, and key political moments in American women’s history. We will use historical methodologies, which means exploring how and why changes occurred and the impact of change on the lives of ordinary people and the nation. Students will work individually and in groups on research assignments
Requirements Satisfied: Foundational Writing and Information Literacy (FWIL) and Humanities
 

HST 095 B —D1: Reel and Real Indians
Instructor: David Massell

This seminar explores the depiction of North American Indians in film. Its objectives are three-fold: to hone our skills as writers; to become more critical observers of commercial film; and to explore a compelling slice of North American cultural history, namely how North American Native Peoples were portrayed, objectified, even invented, by mainstream Euro-Americans, from the nineteenth century to the present, and how Natives themselves responded and ultimately pushed back against such stereotypes.
Requirements Satisfied: Foundational Writing and Information Literacy (FWIL) and Humanities & Diversity
 

 

Philosophy

PHIL 020 D —God, Morality, and Free Will
Instructor: Mark Moyer

We will wrestle with three central topics of philosophy. First, philosophy of religion. Does God exist? We’ll examine arguments pro and con as well as an argument that both sides are wrong. Second, ethics. Is a person who doesn’t help starving people doing something seriously wrong? If you think so, why aren’t you sending off money to charities right now? If you think not, how is such an act different than refusing to save a nearby child drowning in a shallow pond? More generally, what makes an act right or wrong in the first place? Third, free will. It seems that someone acts wrongly only if they at least could have acted otherwise, but how could we possibly have acted differently given that each of us is just a collection of atoms that are all determined to move according to the laws of nature? An examination of these arguments and issues provides students with a broad introduction to philosophy.
Requirements Satisfied: Foundational Writing and Information Literacy (FWIL) and Humanities
 

PHIL 021 C —Ethics: Morality
Instructor: Don Loeb

This course is an introduction to the problems of philosophy, centered on questions in and about morality (or Ethics). We will look at Western philosophical approaches to Ethics (in the analytic tradition) on three levels. Applied Ethics (as it is sometimes called) asks about fairly concrete moral issues. We will look at some relatively recent literature on the morality of abortion, an area which I will argue illustrates that when it comes to ethics, we don’t know nearly as much as we think we do--but philosophy can help! We go on to consider some broad approaches to (what is often called) Normative Ethics. These include approaches such as Utilitarianism and Kantian deontology. Ultimately, we turn to Metaethics and ask whether morality is even a realm of fact--something that could be known at all. We also consider whether religion could be the basis for morality and moral knowledge or provide us with good reasons to behave morally. Early in the term we will take a very brief detour into logic, because some fundamentals will be useful to us in wrestling with the material.
Requirements Satisfied: Foundational Writing and Information Literacy (FWIL) and Humanities
 

 

Religion

REL 021 A —Religions in Asia
Instructor: Kevin Trainor

This class provides an introduction to Asian religious traditions through an exploration of three influential Asian texts, examined in relation to the cultural contexts within which they emerged and from the perspective of their impact on modern European and North American culture. Each of these texts is commonly identified as formative for a particular religion: the Bhagavad Gita and Hinduism, the Dhammapada and Buddhism, and the Daodejing and Daoism. This class will explore these identifications and their implications for understanding Asian religious cultures, and consider some of the distinctive ways that these texts have been engaged and interpreted by modern westerners. This course fulfills the university FWIL (writing) and the university D2 (diversity of human experience) requirement, as well as 3 credits of the 6-credit CAS Humanities distribution requirement and the CAS Non-European Cultures requirement. It also counts toward the Category A and Category B requirements for the Religion major and minor.
Requirements Satisfied: Foundational Writing and Information Literacy (FWIL) and Humanities
 

REL 095 A —Sex & Gender in Bible
Instructor: Anne Clark

While you might assume that God, sin, and salvation are the main subjects of the Bible, it also includes an astonishing array of stories about sex and gender. In this course, we will examine how the origins of Judaism and Christianity were entwined with attempts to define human sexuality and gender differentiation and roles. This exploration will also serve as an introduction to the study of religion, as we grapple with how modern ways of defining religion include—or ignore—the crucial topics of sex and gender.
Requirements Satisfied: Foundational Writing and Information Literacy (FWIL) and Humanities
 

 

World Literature

WLIT 095 A —Women Writers of the Renaissance
Instructor: Paolo Pucci

The class focuses on how Italian female writers (13th-16th centuries) portrayed themselves. We will also rely on male writings to define communities’ expectations of women, with an eye to our contemporary perspectives on gender relations.
Requirements Satisfied: Foundational Writing and Information Literacy (FWIL) and Literature
 

WLIT 095 B —Literary Paris
Instructor: Joseph Acquisto

In this course we will take a trip through space and time, as we read works set in the City of Light, the capital of the emerging modern world. The streets, cathedrals, and monuments of Paris serve as the setting for novels and poems that paint a new portrait of the self in an emerging modern space.  Paris is the place where history and modernity meet, where dreams of love and fortune come true or fall through as these authors trace and react to the changes in the French capital in the modern period.
Requirements Satisfied: Foundational Writing and Information Literacy (FWIL) and Literature
 

WLIT 095 D —Crime Fiction in Spain/Mexico
Instructor: Deborah Cafiero

This course studies detective fiction as a transnational genre that has developed over time from its inception in the mid-19th century to the present. We will survey foundational texts from the United States, identifying the characteristics of the genre and how it reflected the society of its time. Then we will examine crime fiction from Spain and Mexico to analyze the progression of the detective novel through different periods and national landscapes. The goal is to explore how a transnational popular genre, which in its origins reflects a particular type of society and worldview, has been adapted by various authors to express their own local and national systems and conditions. Students will also work to hone the effectiveness of their expression in speaking and writing.
Requirements Satisfied: Foundational Writing and Information Literacy (FWIL) and Literature

 

Natural Sciences

Biology

BIOL 095 A —Biology of Sex
Instructor: Linden Higgins

In this course, we will read and talk about what biologists know (and don’t know) about the processes determining biological sex in humans and other animals. We will explore examples from the scientific and popular media, evaluate the quality of the research and the validity of the arguments, and practice communicating scientific findings to a general audience.
Requirements Satisfied:Foundational Writing and Information Literacy (FWIL) and Non-Lab Natural Science
 

 

Geology

GEOL 095 A —Medical Geology
Instructor: Laura Webb

What are the links between Earth processes and human health? This class will explore such topics such as asbestos, heavy metals, and pathogens, including factors that relate to distribution, toxicity, exposure, testing and regulation.
Requirements Satisfied:Foundational Writing and Information Literacy (FWIL) and Non-Lab Natural Science
 

 

 

Social Sciences

Anthropology

ANTH 040 A —Parenting and Childhood
Instructor: Deborah Blom

Is there a "best way" or a "natural way" to raise a child from infancy to adolescence? Should a child sleep alone? Will "boys be boys"? Should you pick up the baby every time it cries? Parents and others living and working with children are bombarded with multiple, often conflicting theories about "proper" childrearing. Anthropologists can provide a unique perspective to the study of childhood by considering both cultural and biological aspects of humanity. Throughout the semester, we will read sources written by anthropologists and consider questions regarding child-rearing from many different aspects, such as cross-culturally and through non-human primate studies. In doing so, we can appreciate the diversity and multiple perspectives on the topic of children and how to raise them and begin to decide which theories are most credible and relevant for any given situation.
Requirements Satisfied: Foundational Writing and Information Literacy (FWIL) and Social Science
 

 

Economics

EC 095 A & B —The Great Crash of 2007
Instructor: Shirley Gedeon

The global economy was hit hard by the financial crisis of 2007-2008. What happened? What caused the financial crisis and the ensuing Great Recession? Why was the crisis so deep, broad, and prolonged? Is the crisis over? Through the writing of financial journalists who reported on the crisis as it unfolded as well as videos, documentaries, and academic texts, we will look at the reasons why credit in US financial markets increased abnormally in the decade prior to the crisis and how that excess liquidity found an ally that favored speculation and encouraged banks, hedge funds, and other financial institutions to engage in risky derivative trading. We also examine the collapse of the housing bubble which led to mortgage delinquencies and foreclosures and the devaluation of housing-related securities
Requirements Satisfied: Foundational Writing and Information Literacy (FWIL) and Social Science
 

 

Gender, Sexuality, and Women's Studies

GSWS 001 C —Gender, Sexuality, and Women's Studies
Instructor: Annika Ljung-Baruth

GSWS 001 introduces you to feminist perspectives from the period of the beginning of the women's movement to our contemporary society. Concepts such as equality, gender, sexuality, work, parenting, marriage, religion, culture, and health will be discussed and viewed from theoretical and personal perspectives throughout the course. We will achieve a better understanding of ways in which gender and sexuality are shaped by society, culture, and history, and the political and psychological consequences thereof. Exploring ways in which categories of sex and gender intersect with each other as well as with those of race and class, we will ask ourselves how we bring about changes that affect us all positively. In the context of trying to answer that question and many more, we will delve into personal experiences, theoretical perspectives, as well as film and fiction.
Requirements Satisfied: Foundational Writing and Information Literacy (FWIL) and Social Science
 

GSWS 001 F —Gender, Sexuality, and Women's Studies
Instructor: Ellen Andersen

This course introduces the basic vocabulary of Gender, Sexuality, and Women's Studies through an exploration of central questions in the field. What is the difference between sex and gender and how are the two related? Are gender, sexuality, and gender identity biologically determined or socially constructed? How are sex, gender, and sexuality shaped by society, culture, and history?
Requirements Satisfied: Foundational Writing and Information Literacy (FWIL) and Social Science
 

 

Geography

GEOG 095 A —Facing Environmental Futures
Instructor: Harlan Morehouse

As we move deeper into the 21st century, one thing seems certain: the state of the world is uncertain. Whether climate change, biodiversity loss, forest fires, food insecurity, or pandemic, it is clear societies face numerous challenges that threaten to undermine human health and well-being. In this course we examine the roots of these challenges, focusing primarily on climate change and the COVID-19 pandemic. In particular, we ask questions about how these two emergencies came to be, how they are connected, and how we might respond to them in just, equitable, and courageous ways. This course offers an introduction to key concepts in the discipline of geography. Course materials reflect a range of concerns related to climate change and pandemic as well as diverse approaches to understanding them. Instruction is entirely online but will be interactive, discussion-based, and will draw on environmental data and creative concepts to strategize how to face forward and build better futures.
Requirements Satisfied: Foundational Writing and Information Literacy (FWIL) and Social Science
 

 

Linguistics

LING 095 A & B —Deconstructing Humor
Instructor: Diana Popa

Deconstructing Humor is a transdisciplinary, writing-intensive course that helps students develop their ability to work with the linguistic and paralinguistic mechanisms of humor in mediated contexts as well as interpersonal interactions.
Requirements Satisfied: Foundational Writing and Information Literacy (FWIL) and Social Science
 

 

Political Science

POLS 021 A —American Political System
Instructor: Thomas Sullivan

This three-credit introductory course will explore the many branches of the American government and politics. From our country’s founding in 1789 as a Republic with the adoption of a written constitution and the Bill of Rights in 1791, we will study the power, purpose, and theory of the American Political System. Each branch of government, the Congress, the Presidency, and the Federal Courts will be discussed, along with the role that elections, political parties, special interest groups and public opinion play in shaping law and public policy in the United States. The important role that citizens play in a constitutional Republic will also be examined.
Requirements Satisfied: Foundational Writing and Information Literacy (FWIL) and Social Science
 

POLS 041 A & B —Intro to Political Theory
Instructor: Robert Taylor

This course is designed to introduce students to a number of major issues and themes in political theory, such as the problems of political morality, justice, obligation, freedom, and revolution. We will examine the way a number of different political theorists and thinkers have dealt with these problems, the philosophical elements from which they have constructed their theories and arguments, and the ways in which their ideas may or may not be useful in helping us to think about our political order and political problems.
Requirements Satisfied: Foundational Writing and Information Literacy (FWIL) and Humanities
 

POLS 071 A —Comparative World Politics
Instructor: Matthew Carlson

This course will introduce you to some of the central issues in the field of comparative politics, one of the four main subfields of political science that focuses on the study of politics within countries.
Requirements Satisfied: Foundational Writing and Information Literacy (FWIL) and Social Science
 

POLS 095 A —Authoritarianism
Instructor: Peter VonDoepp

This seminar will explore the varied nature, development, and consequences of authoritarianism as a system of rule.  While we will focus considerably on the character and emergence of authoritarianism in our contemporary era, we will also delve into patterns and experiences that have existed historically.  Our work will include specific case analyses where we conduct research to understand the exact nature of authoritarian rule in particular countries.  We will also examine scholarship to help us understand key theoretical questions.  These include: How do authoritarian leaders exercise and maintain power?  Why are some dictators more successful than others in generating stability?  And why might populations turn to and even embrace anti-democratic leaders and movements?
Requirements Satisfied: Foundational Writing and Information Literacy (FWIL) and Social Science

Psychological Science

PSYS 070 A —Meanings of Madness
Instructor: Judith Christensen

Why use such a pejorative term as "madness" for the title of this course? Students will use a multi-perspective approach to understand what is behind mental health stigma and will examine ways to break down such destructive stereotypes and treatment barriers.
Requirements Satisfied: Foundational Writing and Information Literacy (FWIL) and Social Science
 

PSYS 095 C —Teenage Brain
Instructor: Jamie Abaied

This developmental psychology course explores ways that puberty and brain development can help us understand the patterns of behavior, emotions, and social interactions that are common during adolescence.
Requirements Satisfied: Foundational Writing and Information Literacy (FWIL) and Social Science
 

PSYS 095 D —Chasing Happiness
Instructor: Shamila Lekka

This course is designed to take you on a journey to explore and understand the concept of happiness from the contemporary western perspective and the teachings of Theravada Buddhism. Are there scientifically validated explanations of why some of us are more content with life than others? How much of our perception of happiness is within our control? What can Theravada Buddhism teach us about happiness and living a meaningful life? In this course we will learn effective strategies to handle challenges we face. To do this, we will practice what we learn. We will also discuss the struggles individuals may encounter to change some of the habits we have developed over the years. By the end of this class, you would have examined how much control you have of your own happiness and you will have created a document for yourself on how you can maintain a well-balanced mind and body.
Requirements Satisfied: Foundational Writing and Information Literacy (FWIL) and Social Science
 

PSYS 095 E —Psychology of Harry Potter
Instructor: Nicole Breslend

The Harry Potter series is a world-wide phenomenon that encompasses seven books, eight movies, and even a theme park. The story is no doubt captivating and magical (pun intended), but what can it tell us about the critical concepts in the field of psychology? In this first-year seminar, we will explore the many examples of psychology in action at Hogwarts including child development, personality, interpersonal relationships, trauma and resilience, obedience, prejudice, and more. In this course you will learn about these core psychological concepts and how to apply them to the world of Harry Potter through reading empirical articles, discussion, and reflection. To engage in this course, students should have read the Harry Potter book series and/or watched the films. Students should come to this course familiar with the characters and major plot points.
Requirements Satisfied: Foundational Writing and Information Literacy (FWIL) and Social Science