Classroom

TAP is a writing-intensive elective program for first-year students in the College of Arts and Sciences that combines an interactive course environment with careful academic advising. In the fall semester, students enroll in one TAP seminar on a topic of common interest. TAP seminars encourage students to approach major issues from a variety of points of view by developing creative projects and expressing what they learned through speech and writing. The professor, who also serves as an academic advisor, helps further explore a student's interests and academic goals. All TAP seminars satisfy the University's Writing and Information Literacy Requirement and many also satisfy one of the College’s Distribution Requirements (Fine Arts, Humanities, Natural Science, or Social Science).

Fall 2019 Teacher-Advisor Program (TAP) Seminars

Fine Arts

Art and Art History

ARTH 096 A —Why Build That?
Instructor: William Mierse

Ever wondered why architects make the decisions that they do? Why did someone build that building in that manner? This is a course that helps you find some of the answers to those questions. Along the way you get the chance to learn how to formulate the questions, explore the formal aspects of buildings, develop research strategies for pursuing other aspects of the building's history, use primary source materials, critique secondary sources, and develop your own interpretation of why a building was built like that. This is a discussion based, seminar style course. At every meeting we discuss some aspect of architecture that you have begun to examine on your own either through assigned readings, video viewing, or independent research. This is a course that functions only when everyone participates. Sometimes the participation is in the form of discussions, sometimes group presentations, and sometimes individual presentations. There is lots of analytical writing, and the assignments take a variety of different forms from critiques of videos and presentations, to formal letter writing, to research papers.
Requirements Satisfied: Fine Arts or Humanities and Foundational Writing and Information Literacy
 

ARTS 001 A —Drawing
Instructor: Margaret Kay McDevitt

Drawing has always been a fundamental part of art making. However, in the last several years drawing has gained credibility as an established method of creating finished artworks. Drawing 001 is an introduction to the methods, materials, and concepts involved in drawing. The projects will range from observational drawing, including live models, to organic abstraction.
Requirements Satisfied: Fine Arts and Foundational Writing and Information Literacy
 

ARTS 001 D —Drawing 
Instructor: Cameron Davis

Drawing (informally titled "Drawing & Nature") is fundamentally a skills-based class employing multiple strategies of seeing in order to develop ways to translate three-dimensions onto a two-dimensional surface through the use of graphic mediums such as pencil, charcoal, conte crayon, ink and pastel. Concepts of composition, abstraction, decision-making, and inquiry into the nature of what constitutes a drawing are considered.

The notion of drawing “practice” is emphasized through homework sketchbook exercises to re-enforce concepts and strategies.

During this class we will be taking advantage of the UVM Centennial woods to draw outside as well as in the drawing studio. Assignments will consider both the historic responses to the landscape, as well as contemporary understanding and use. The work will engage environmental thought including “perceiving ecologically” (Laura Sewell) as a framework for larger projects and reflective writing.

“Art functions on multiple levels, just as nature does.” Nora Bateson, film, “Ecology of Mind,” based on the work of father Gregory Bateson
Requirements Satisfied: Fine Arts and Foundational Writing and Information Literacy

 

ARTS 012 B —Perspectives on Art
Instructor: Shelley Warren

A major aspect in the art of making is the studio experience. In this course you will be introduced to contemporary art practices used in the making, presenting and analyzing of art works. You will have the opportunity to use a wide variety of media that may include: drawing, painting, color, photography, three-dimensional construction, digital imaging, sound, and/or video. We explore the relationships between methods and meanings in art making, the role of experiment, and the translation of experience into artwork. The course aims to promote the development of each student’s individual sensibilities with a foundation that encourages diverse and engaging practices. Reading, talking and looking are integral to art making and will be major themes of this course through gallery and museum exhibits, Visiting Artist lectures and informal discussions.
Requirements Satisfied: Fine Arts and Foundational Writing and Information Literacy
 

ARTS 095 A —Wheel Throwing
Instructor: Hoyt Barringer

"In just taking an apple from the tree, and eating the whole thing, there are no mistakes to be made." - Shoji Hamada.

In this course, the potter's wheel is used as the primary forming process for making functional and sculptural stoneware pieces. Students will gain considerable experience with process and materials developing the necessary skills and competence to connect the hand and eye with the heart and mind. What constitutes a well thrown form technically and sculpturally? How do we determine proper proportion, form and function? Visual, tactile and historical possibilities are explored using stoneware clay, slips, oxides and glazes high-fired in a gas kiln.
Requirements Satisfied: Fine Arts and Foundational Writing and Information Literacy
 

 

Arts and Sciences Interdisciplinary

AS 095 A —Drawing? Yes, you can!
Instructor: Martin Thaler

Much of your college career will be spent learning things that you didn’t know before. Yet, when it comes to drawing, people somehow believe that it is often a “gift” that some people get, and others do not. This course challenges that notion by saying anyone can draw, provided they have the desire to do it and make the commitment to practice.

To those that say you can’t, think about this...would you walk into a Spanish class and say, “Sorry I can’t speak Spanish!” Of course you wouldn’t... you would expect that professor to teach you Spanish... but when it comes to drawing, often the student’s response is “I can’t draw.” They take a position that implies impossibility before they’ve even tried...this class is designed to take any student from the place of, “I can’t”, to a world of possibilities that encourages artistic expression, and will celebrate the unique style that every student inherently brings with them. Therefore, while the class offers tangible techniques that allow each student to create three-dimensional images on a two-dimensional surface, it also acknowledges that there are many different ways to draw, and that there is no one “right" way to draw.

The first part of the semester will focus on skill building while the second part will allow students to manipulate those skills with the goal creating a means to expressing themselves artistically.

Of equal importance to the class is learning the life skills that help you draw, but that you can also you apply to any other course. These focus on how to do self-assessment without being self-destructive, how to take risks that lead to better outcomes, time management and organizational tools, seeing the positive rather than the negative, understanding that failure is a natural part of the discovery process, learning that being a perfectionist can lead down a road to unhappiness, and striving to learn patience, and that doing anything that you want to do well takes time and commitment.

Writing requirements will be fulfilled through journal assignments and writing assignments that focus on responses to both historical and contemporary styles of Art. There will be field trips that explore a variety of drawing styles. (Will not count for Studio Art major or minor).
Requirements Satisfied: Fine Arts and Foundational Writing and Information Literacy

 

 

Dance

 

DNCE 095 A —Environment & Performance
Instructor: Julian Barnett

This course is designed for students with an interest in the relationship between the human body, its environment, and performance. The course will orient itself around the processes of the body, as it moves, witnesses, and discerns and the various contexts that frame it, around Burlington and the UVM campus, to uniquely understand performance as a transformative structure, evolving process, and embodied viewpoint. The goals of the course are to heighten an individual's sensitivity to naturalistic practices that help build an understanding of how performance functions as a way of seeing, as well as being, and the vital role it can have in relationship to place, space, location, time, geography, etc. In addition to formal and informal writing assignments and maintaining a journal, the course will incorporate a variety of experiential exercises and assignments into our investigations, and will integrate the imagination and self-practice alongside techniques rooted in moving and thinking.
Requirements Satisfied: Fine Arts and Foundational Writing and Information Literacy
 

 

Film and Television Studies

FTS 095 A —Horror Film
Instructor: Hyon Joo Yoo

We are simultaneously attracted to, and repelled by all things freakish and monstrous. Different genre films make use of this to raise questions about ourselves and our society. Before we can answer these questions, we need to acknowledge that film is a social medium and we the audience are the reader of culture. We also must analyze our own fear and the enjoyment that we get from the spectacle of monstrosity. In this course, we will connect film texts to our own sense of who we are, both individually and socially, and what our society values and fears.
Requirements Satisfied: Fine Arts and Foundational Writing and Information Literacy
 

 

Theatre

THE 010 A —Intro to Acting
Instructor: Craig Wells

Improvisational exercises, assigned monologues, and scene work will provide students an opportunity to learn about script analysis, dramatic conflict, character-driven objectives, and the importance of listening when acting. A research paper on acting techniques, written assignments, and weekly journal entries throughout the semester will serve to help students further their understanding of acting, discover a character’s goals, objectives, and actions as it pertains to the work assigned, as well as reflect on their progress in class. Performance projects will require out of class preparation and in class performance and critique. Students will prepare and memorize a minimum of three pieces during the semester: a story, a monologue, and a scene. These presentations will be assigned and performed in class and require outside class rehearsal time.
Requirements Satisfied: Fine Arts and Foundational Writing and Information Literacy
 

THE 095 A —Rock Concert Lighting & Production
Instructor: John Forbes

Lights! Sound! Rock and Roll! Explore the world behind the band and discover how designers and technicians transform the music experience into a live concert event. Discover the foundations of modern concert production up to the present day. Learn the basic elements of concert lighting and how designers collaborate with musical artists in realizing the music in a fluid, ever changing state of illumination. Look at the expanding universe of special effects from projections to atmospherics to the physical alteration of the performance space in a variety of concert venues. And understand how technicians in all of these areas achieve the desired results through the use of state-of-the-art equipment. Study the theory in the classroom – see the results onstage. Rock on!
Requirements Satisfied: Fine Arts and Foundational Writing and Information Literacy
 

 

 

Humanities

Asian Languages & Literature

JAPN 095 A —Intro to Translation Studies
Instructor: Kyle Ikeda

Translations play a vital role not only in information transmission across cultures and languages, but also in the realm of creative content. While google translate has made more of the global internet more accessible with a simple copy/paste, the translating of subtle and intricate nuances of cultural content require the expertise of the human translator. In the digital media era the need for more translators has only grown as consumers of cultural content have increasingly demanded immediate access to movies, video games, graphic novels, manga, anime, television dramas, novels, and other media. During the semester we will examine various forms of translation within the increasingly digital globalized world of content media, including video game and popular entertainment localization, film and video subtitling vs dubbing, simultaneous release translation/subtitling, and emerging forms of user generated scanlations and localization projects. In addition to issues in cultural translation from Japanese, the course explores examples from other foreign languages through guest lectures by faculty across UVM’s foreign language departments.
Requirements Satisfied: Literature and Foundational Writing and Information Literacy
 

 

Classics

CLAS 095 B —Ancient World Then & Now
Instructor: Angeline Chiu

Course description coming soon.
Requirements Satisfied: Humanities and Foundational Writing and Information Literacy
 

 

English

ENGS 005 A & B —King Arthur
Instructor: James Williamson

In this course students will follow the development of the Arthurian legends in literary history, and we will watch a couple of films (yes, we will watch Monty Python and the Holy Grail!). Course goals and objectives include, 1) to become familiar with the early works which served to define the legends as they come down to us from the medieval period, 2) to explore the themes (quest, love, etc.) which have characterized the legends, and 3) to examine how subsequent periods up to modernity have "re-invented" the Arthurian legends to reflect their own concerns: what is it about the Arthurian legends that has made them able to serve as a transparency to address concerns in cultural contexts far removed what gave birth to them? Specific works read will include, among others, Sir Gawain and the Green Knight and T.H. White’s The Once and Future King.
Requirements Satisfied: Literature and Foundational Writing and Information Literacy
 

ENGS 005 C —American Poetry, Gender, and Sexual Identity
Instructor: Eve Alexandra

In this introduction to American poetry, special consideration will be given to poets/poetic movements seeking to establish, interrogate, and complicate identity through the lens of gender and sexuality. This is a literature class with a creative writing component. Grades will be based on participation, presentations, and writing assignments.
Requirements Satisfied: Literature and Foundational Writing and Information Literacy
 

ENGS 005 G —Danger of a Single Story
Instructor: Sarah Turner

Utilizing the Nigerian-American novelist Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie’s TED talk “The Danger of the Single Story” as a guiding principal, the class will read a variety of contemporary texts -- novels, short stories, movies -- written by and about non-hegemonic groups living in the United States today that explore the intersections of race, class, socioeconomics, racism and institutionalized racism. Over the duration of the course, students will consider the questions of race and racism through a variety of lenses – and will work toward a more comprehensive view of race as a social construct while at the same time exploring stereotypes they themselves might hold. The course will include a service-learning component that will allow students to interact with the larger Burlington community and extend our class work beyond the walls of the classroom.
Requirements Satisfied: Literature and Foundational Writing and Information Literacy
 

ENGS 005 H —At Work America
Instructor: Holly Painter

The focus of this course is the jobs people do and how interviews, oral histories, and written histories can uncover, preserve, and present these workers’ stories. Students will learn and practice field research skills and gain an understanding of large economic forces that shape work in the U.S, as well as how workers’ identities and demographic characteristics interact with these forces. With this foundation, students will interview workers in the community and present each oral history in a different way. Students will work with classmates to develop and revise interviews and writing, and each assignment will be guided by readings that both model what students will produce and provide further history and context for the larger theme of how jobs are changing in the U.S.
Requirements Satisfied: Humanities and Foundational Writing and Information Literacy
 

 

History

HST 095 A —Women's History
Instructor: Melanie Gustafson

This seminar provides an introduction to American women’s political and social activism from the nineteenth century to today. It begins with an examination of the anti-slavery and women’s rights movements before the Civil War, continues with a focus on the struggle for the right to vote and the subsequent battles for political inclusion, and culminates with a discussion of the rise of global feminism. The course is designed to introduce students to important leaders and their ideas, the evolution of movements for equal rights and social justice, and key political moments in American women’s history. We will use historical methodologies, which means exploring how and why changes occurred and the impact of change on the lives of ordinary people and the nation. Students will work individually and in groups on research assignments.
Requirements Satisfied: Humanities and Foundational Writing and Information Literacy
 

HST 095 B —Reel and Real Indians
Instructor: David Massell

This seminar explores the depiction of North American Indians in film. Its objectives are three-fold: to hone our skills as writers; to become more critical observers of commercial film; and to explore a compelling slice of North American cultural history, namely how North American Native Peoples were portrayed, objectified, even invented, by mainstream Euro-Americans, from the nineteenth century to the present, and how Natives themselves responded and ultimately pushed back against such stereotypes. The seminar's opening unit includes a field trip to the Odanak Indian Reserve in Quebec.
Requirements Satisfied: Humanities, (D1) Race Relations and Ethnicity in the U.S., and Foundational Writing and Information Literacy
 

HST 095 C —History of the Present
Instructor: Steven Zdatny

Functioning as a sort of first-year seminar, this course will explore some of the most compelling and difficult issues of the present moment, alongside a more general orientation to university life. The meat of the course will be readings from some of the most influential thinkers now defining these dialogues: Steven Pinker on progress and inequality; Coleman Hughes and Ta Nehisi Coates on race in America, Christina Hoff Sommers on “the war against boys,” Jonathan Haidt on “the coddling of the American mind,” Heather MacDonald on diversity, and other elements of the Great American Conversation. The course will involve short, more or less weekly essays on the reading and discussions of that material and a five-page term paper, as we try to bring historical perspective, and the rules of evidence and logic, to the problems confronting American society.
Requirements Satisfied: Humanities and Foundational Writing and Information Literacy
 

 

Philosophy

PHIL 010 C — Intro Philosophy: East and West
Instructor: Sin-Yee Chan

Course description coming soon.
Requirements Satisfied: Humanities and Foundational Writing and Information Literacy
 

PHIL 010 F —Intro Philosophy: Selected Problems
Instructor: Mark Moyer

We will wrestle with three central topics of philosophy. First, philosophy of religion. Does God exist? We’ll examine arguments pro and con as well as an argument that both sides are wrong. Second, ethics. Is a person who doesn’t help starving people doing something seriously wrong? If you think so, why aren’t you sending off money to charities right now? If you think not, how is such an act different than refusing to save a nearby child drowning in a shallow pond? More generally, what makes an act right or wrong in the first place? Third, free will. It seems that someone acts wrongly only if they at least could have acted otherwise, but how could we possibly have acted differently given that each of us is just a collection of atoms that are all determined to move according to the laws of nature? An examination of these arguments and issues provides students with a broad introduction to philosophy.
Requirements Satisfied: Humanities and Foundational Writing and Information Literacy
 

PHIL 010 G — God, Freedom, and Immorality
Instructor: Louis deRosset

In this course you will read, think, and write about some big questions, including the existence of God, the freedom of the will, the nature of persons, and the nature of morality.
Requirements Satisfied: Humanities and Foundational Writing and Information Literacy
 

PHIL 010 H —Intro Philosophy: Selected Problems
Instructor: Randall Harp

Human beings act for reasons; we understand our behavior by appeal to those reasons which justify it, and we aim to bring our actions in line with reasons. We also have reasons for believing things. In addition to acting on reasons, and believing things for reasons, we have the capacity to reflect on our reasons. When we philosophize, we investigate our own reasons for acting and believing. In this course, we will learn philosophy in particular with respect to a selected number of philosophical problems: the Problem of Evil and the existence of God; how we come to have knowledge of the world; the question of whether we have free will; and what ethical behavior consists in. We will conclude by looking at four ethical problems: abortion, the consumption of animals, prostitution, and the illegality of drug use.
Requirements Satisfied: Humanities and Foundational Writing and Information Literacy
 

 

Religion

REL 020 A —Comparing Religions: Buddha & Christ
Instructor: Kevin Trainor

Whatever our religious backgrounds, most of us in the U.S. probably feel much more familiar with Christianity than Buddhism, and tend to separate the two traditions along a great East-West divide. This course aims to complicate that perspective. It provides an introduction to the study of religion through a detailed comparative analysis of these two traditions, illuminating some surprising similarities as well as important differences in their histories and practices. Students will have the opportunity to complete a ritual research project and present their research to the class.
Requirements Satisfied: Humanities, (D2) Non-European Cultures, and Foundational Writing and Information Literacy
 

REL 021 A —Religions in Asia
Instructor: Thomas Borchert

Religions have been present in Asia for thousands of years, but the category of “religion” is not quite two hundred years old there. The development of this category helps us understand some aspects of life in Asian communities, but it has also had an impact on what is and what is not allowable within religious communities of Asia. In this course we will examine several different Asian religions – Hinduism, Buddhism, Confucianism, Daoism and Shinto – as they are practiced, but also as they have been communicated through central narratives of the Ramayana, the Vessantara Jataka, and Journey to the West.
Requirements Satisfied: Humanities, (D2) Non-European Cultures, and Foundational Writing and Information Literacy
 

REL 023 A —What is the Bible?
Instructor: Anne Clark

It’s one of the most influential books in human history, but what is it? We will explore how the Jewish and Christian Bibles were produced in the communities of ancient Israel and the Christian movement, as those people grappled with the deepest problems of existence. This course will serve as an introduction to the study of religion through an examination of selected biblical and related texts and the cultures that produced and preserved these texts. Throughout the course, we will ask questions about the nature of religion and about understanding the religious expressions of people of other cultures and historical periods. We will examine the religious beliefs of the peoples of the ancient Babylon, then turn to our major focus on the development of ancient Israel and the emergence of the Christian movement. In looking at each of these closely related yet strikingly diverse religious cultures, we will try to understand how the evidence of their beliefs and practices allows us to construct a picture of what we call religion. In investigating these religious traditions, we will examine how the identity of each community was articulated, especially in terms of boundaries defining insiders and outsiders. We will consider how people engaged religious symbols to organize their societies including aspects of personal identity and social hierarchies. Our investigations will begin with the problem of defining religion and the ways in which our own position in the 21st-century West must be examined so that we can both see very different ways of formulating the nature of reality and refrain from assuming an inherent bias against the past (e.g., as “backward”) or religion (e.g., “as irrational or superstitious”).
Requirements Satisfied: Humanities, (D2) Non-European Cultures, and Foundational Writing and Information Literacy
 

REL 095 A —Creating Community: Religion in US
Instructor: Erica Andrus

No matter what your personal relationship to religion or spirituality may be, religion surrounds us and impacts us in the United States. The more you know about it, the more you can see how fascinating, complicated, and important religion is to our sense of who we are as Americans. This course introduces the history and variety of religions in America using different approaches, like anthropology, history, and sociology. We'll look specifically at Native American, Jewish, Muslim, and Afro-Atlantic religions, and how these groups understand themselves as both fully American and fully belonging to their own minority religious and ethnic groups, adding to the strength and diversity of our nation. Grades will be based on classroom and/or online participation including reading responses, and a research project. Students choose any religion they want to know more about to research and present to the class. They will practice how to write an annotated bibliography, how to navigate the library research databases, how to write for different audiences, and how to combine images, audio, and dialogue into an effective presentation to the class.
Requirements Satisfied: Humanities, (D1) Race Relations and Ethnicity in the U.S., and Foundational Writing and Information Literacy
 

 

World Literature

WLIT 095 A —Tales from the Global City
Instructor: Ignacio Lopez-Vicuna

What conventional boundaries must we transgress in order to form authentic communities? How can we live together as diverse groups of strangers? In the late-20th and early 21st centuries, world cities are crucibles of diversity and mobility, yet globalization and privatization lead to individuals’ isolation and alienation. In this course, we will examine the individual’s search for connectedness, purpose, and beauty in the international metropolises of New York, Shanghai, Buenos Aires, and Mexico City through literary fiction and nonfiction, framed by the lenses of urban theory and architecture. Throughout the course, we will consider the extent to which diverse bodies (marked by gender, race and ethnicity, sexuality) are free (or not) to circulate in urban space, and how.
Requirements Satisfied: Humanities and Foundational Writing and Information Literacy
 

WLIT 095 B —European Fairy Tales
Instructor: Cristina Mazzoni

You are probably very familiar with the stories of Cinderella, Sleeping Beauty, and Rapunzel, but you may not realize that the oldest versions of these tales come from Renaissance Italy. More interestingly, few people know that the first Cinderella murdered her own stepmother by crushing her skull with the lid of a trunk; that the original Sleeping Beauty was raped and impregnated by a king married to someone else; and that Rapunzel, in the earliest version of the tale, drugged with opium the ogress so she could have sex with the prince who climbed up the tower on her long braids. In this course, we will read these and other tale types from the European tradition (including "Beauty and the Beast” and "Little Red Riding Hood”) and watch some of the most compelling of their film adaptations. Students in this course will do the following, both orally and in writing: describe the origins, structure, meanings, and historical development of European fairy tales as a literary genre; retell a number of classic European fairy tales, highlighting in the process the differences between versions from various times and places, and some of the reasons for these differences; analyze fairy tales according to a variety of critical approaches, including structuralist, feminist, and psychoanalytic. Because this is a seminar-style course, class participation counts heavily towards the final grade, and students will be expected to do all readings and prepare all discussion questions before each class meeting. The rest of the grade is determined by two oral presentations, one research essay, a class journal, a midterm, and a final.
Requirements Satisfied: Literature and Foundational Writing and Information Literacy
 

 

 

Social Sciences

Anthropology

ANTH 095 A —Ruins
Instructor: Scott Van Keuren

Ruins of the past mesmerize the imagination. From ancient sites to present-day abandoned buildings, we are fascinated by the remains of societal collapse and decay. What fuels this fixation and what does it say about our sense of ourselves and the world around us? Is this schadenfreude, or pleasure taken in experiencing others’ misfortunes? Are we gearing up for our own dystopic futures? And most important, how and why do we feed this fixation through “ruin-porn,” urban-exploration, artifact collecting, and other means? The class tackles these questions through readings, discussion, and site visitations, with special attention to the portrayal of ruins in film, photography, and other media. Case-studies will range broadly from archaeological sites in the past to modern warzones and urban ruins. The course will expand your critical awareness of an important dimension of the human experience.
Requirements Satisfied: Social Science and Foundational Writing and Information Literacy
 

 

Economics

EC 045 A —Latin American Development
Instructor: Catalina Vizcarra

Why is Latin America a relatively poor region in spite of its abundant natural resources? Why does the region have the most unequal distribution of income in the world, and why are there so many Hispanic immigrants in the United States? In this course we will discuss whether the roots of Latin America's relative underdevelopment lie in its colonial experience, in subsequent foreign intervention, or in misguided domestic economic policies. We will also learn about the benefits and challenges that the most recent wave of globalization poses to the more than 600 million Latin Americans. In the process of addressing these questions, students will be introduced to a number of economic theories central to the analysis of the development process.
Requirements Satisfied: Social Science, (D2) Non-European Cultures, and Foundational Writing and Information Literacy
 

EC 095 A —The Great Crash of 2007
Instructor: Shirley Gedeon

The global economy was hit hard by the financial crisis of 2007-2008. What happened? What caused the financial crisis and the ensuing Great Recession? Why was the crisis so deep, broad, and prolonged? Is the crisis over? Through the writing of financial journalists who reported on the crisis as it unfolded as well as videos, documentaries, and academic texts, we will look at the reasons why credit in US financial markets increased abnormally in the decade prior to the crisis and how that excess liquidity found an ally that favored speculation and encouraged banks, hedge funds, and other financial institutions to engage in risky derivative trading. We also examine the collapse of the housing bubble which led to mortgage delinquencies and foreclosures and the devaluation of housing-related securities. This course is appropriate for students with an interest in economics, business, finance, and banking. No prior knowledge of economics is required; however, students should have an interest in reading the financial press, learning about financial markets, and understanding why financial systems can become unstable.
Requirements Satisfied: Social Science and Foundational Writing and Information Literacy
 

EC 095 B —The Great Crash of 2007
Instructor: Shirley Gedeon

The global economy was hit hard by the financial crisis of 2007-2008. What happened? What caused the financial crisis and the ensuing Great Recession? Why was the crisis so deep, broad, and prolonged? Is the crisis over? Through the writing of financial journalists who reported on the crisis as it unfolded as well as videos, documentaries, and academic texts, we will look at the reasons why credit in US financial markets increased abnormally in the decade prior to the crisis and how that excess liquidity found an ally that favored speculation and encouraged banks, hedge funds, and other financial institutions to engage in risky derivative trading. We also examine the collapse of the housing bubble which led to mortgage delinquencies and foreclosures and the devaluation of housing-related securities. This course is appropriate for students with an interest in economics, business, finance, and banking. No prior knowledge of economics is required; however, students should have an interest in reading the financial press, learning about financial markets, and understanding why financial systems can become unstable.
Requirements Satisfied: Social Science and Foundational Writing and Information Literacy
 

 

Gender, Sexuality & Women's Studies

GSWS 001 A —Gender, Sexuality, and Women's Studies
Instructor: Annika Ljung-Baruth

This course introduces the basic vocabulary of Gender, Sexuality, and Women's Studies through an exploration of central questions in the field. What is the difference between sex and gender and how are the two related? What are sexual and gender identities? How are sex, gender, and sexuality shaped by society, culture, and history? What is their relationship to politics? How do gender and sexuality intersect with each other as well as with other aspects of identity/experience like race and class? What is meant by terms like sexism, heterosexism, heteronormativity, homonormativity, and cisgender privilege? How are sex, gender, and sexuality created and maintained in mainstream culture? How have social movements challenged and changed norms around gender and sexuality? We will explore these and other questions throughout this semester-long introduction to the interdisciplinary field of Gender, Sexuality, and Women's Studies.
Requirements Satisfied: Social Science and Foundational Writing and Information Literacy
 

GSWS 001 B —Gender, Sexuality, and Women's Studies
Instructor: Ellen Andersen

This course introduces the basic vocabulary of Gender, Sexuality, and Women's Studies through an exploration of central questions in the field. What is the difference between sex and gender and how are the two related? What are sexual and gender identities? How are sex, gender, and sexuality shaped by society, culture, and history? What is their relationship to politics? How do gender and sexuality intersect with each other as well as with other aspects of identity/experience like race and class? What is meant by terms like sexism, heterosexism, heteronormativity, homonormativity, and cisgender privilege? How are sex, gender, and sexuality created and maintained in mainstream culture? How have social movements challenged and changed norms around gender and sexuality? We will explore these and other questions throughout this semester-long introduction to the interdisciplinary field of Gender, Sexuality, and Women's Studies.
Requirements Satisfied: Social Science and Foundational Writing and Information Literacy
 

 

Global and Regional Studies

GRS 095 G —Italian Cinema
Instructor: Antonello Borra

The history of Italian cinema runs parallel to the history of cinema itself and the work of Italian directors such as Rossellini, De Sica, Fellini, and Antonioni has been extremely influential. Starting with Giovanni Pastrone’s Cabiria (1914) up to the present day, Italian films have both entertained and moved audiences all over the world as well as provided inspiration to countless directors. This course will follow the historical trajectory of Italian cinema and concentrate on Neorealism and Comedy Italian Style. Students will have to opportunity to watch, discuss, and write about films originating in a remarkably different socio-cultural environment that nonetheless manage to transcend national, historical, and linguistic boundaries and encourage today’s generations to scrutinize their own systems of values.
Requirements Satisfied: Fine Arts and Foundational Writing and Information Literacy
 

 

Political Science

POLS 021 A —American Political System
Instructor: Deborah Guber

Institutions, processes, and problems of American government.
Requirements Satisfied: Social Science and Foundational Writing and Information Literacy
 

POLS 021 F —American Political System
Instructor: Deborah Guber

Institutions, processes, and problems of American government.
Requirements Satisfied: Social Science and Foundational Writing and Information Literacy
 

POLS 041 A —Political Theory
Instructor: Patrick Neal

This course is designed to introduce you to some important issues in the field of political theory, and to encourage and stimulate you to think seriously about them. The course presupposes no prior knowledge of political theory. The only "prerequisites" are an interest in the philosophical questions that lie at the heart of political life, and a willingness to read and think seriously about them. This semester, we will address questions like these: Can the state enforce morality? If not, why not? If so, how is that morality to be determined? What are the limits of individual liberty? What duties do we owe to the political community? Is it ever legitimate to disobey the law? When? What does political equality mean? Do our institutions save us from our nature or corrupt that nature? The means of addressing these questions will be the close and critical examination of various texts by both contemporary and classical writers.
Requirements Satisfied: Humanities and Foundational Writing and Information Literacy
 

 

Psychological Science

PSYS 095 A —Meanings of Madness
Instructor: Judith Christensen

Why use such a pejorative term as ‘madness” for the title of this course? This term has history and the stigma often associated with mental health diagnoses. And why use the plural “meanings”? Insanity, craziness or madness were terms used to describe a spectrum of behaviors characterized by abnormal mental or behavioral patterns. Insanity may manifest as violations of societal norms, including a person becoming a danger to themselves or others, though not all such acts are considered insanity; likewise, not all acts showing indifference toward societal norms are acts of insanity. In modern usage, insanity is most commonly encountered as an informal unscientific term denoting mental instability, or in the narrow legal context of the insanity defense. In the medical profession the term is now avoided in favor of diagnoses of specific mental disorders; the presence of delusions or hallucinations is broadly referred to as psychosis. When discussing mental illness in general terms, "psychopathology" is considered a preferred descriptor. In 1973, the weight of empirical data, coupled with changing social norms and the development of a politically active gay community in the United States, led the Board of Directors of the American Psychiatric Association to remove homosexuality from the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (DSM). Some psychiatrists who fiercely opposed their action subsequently circulated a petition calling for a vote on the issue by the Association's membership. That vote was held in 1974, and the Board's decision was ratified. Thus, a new diagnosis, ego-dystonic homosexuality, was created for the DSM's third edition in 1980. Ego dystonic homosexuality was indicated by: (1) a persistent lack of heterosexual arousal, which the patient experienced as interfering with initiation or maintenance of wanted heterosexual relationships, and (2) persistent distress from a sustained pattern of unwanted homosexual arousal. Widespread prejudice against homosexuality in the United States meant that many homosexual people were convinced that they should go through mental health treatment to overcome their homosexuality because it could be considered ego dystonic. In 1986, the diagnosis was removed entirely from the DSM. Was this Science? This is your first important question. Your task as a student of this subject is to consider the many "meanings of madness" and how psychological science can advance our understanding, prevention and treatment of mental health challenges. Most importantly, we consider the important role of psychological science in overcoming the long-standing stigma associated with mental health problems.
Requirements Satisfied: Social Science and Foundational Writing and Information Literacy

 

 

Sociology

SOC 011 A —Social Problems
Instructor: Lutz Kaelber

The main purpose of this course is to introduce students to the sociological analysis of social problems as they occur around the globe. From a comparative and cross-cultural perspective, we will look at issues such as world population growth, immigration and migration patterns, threats to the environment, racial, ethnic, and gender inequalities, demographic changes, and problems in the economy.
Requirements Satisfied: Social Science and Foundational Writing and Information Literacy
 

SOC 095 A —Environmental Justice/Unequal World
Instructor: Thomas Macias

The study of environmental justice begins with the assumption that both the social and ecological costs of capitalist production are unequally distributed among individuals and groups in society.  That is, the placement of toxic waste, safe working conditions, and access to green space and quality housing are not randomly distributed among people either within the U.S. or throughout the world.   Given this premise, the sociological approach taken in this course seeks to accomplish the following:

  1. Account for the structure of inequality based on race, gender, culture and socioeconomic class that, to a large degree, determines the uneven distribution of environmental costs;
  2. Explore the dynamic role of activism within the environmental justice movement which works to unite local communities and challenge the status quo of environmental inequity;
  3. Consider the possibility of a more equitable system of environmental justice based upon an awareness that long-term solutions require a global perspective and collaboration across social categories of difference.
  4. Provide a critical perspective on the differences between mainstream environmental movements and the more local and communal efforts of environmental justice activists.

Requirements Satisfied: Social Science and Foundational Writing and Information Literacy
 

 

 

Natural Sciences and Mathematics

Biology

BIOL 095 B —Human Evolution: Cambrian to Present
Instructor: Kristin Bishop-von Wettberg

How do human beings fit into the natural world? Are we fundamentally different from other animals, or do we just have a specialized skill set? Who are our closest relatives among non-vertebrates? Among the vertebrates? How did our evolutionary history lead our species to occupy such a key ecological role that the very future of the global ecosystem depends on the choices we make? Through readings, videos, exploratory writing, and discussion we will critically examine our place in the natural world and how we came to occupy it. We will begin the semester learning about the history of evolutionary thought leading up to Darwin’s theory of evolution by natural selection and studying the mechanism of natural selection. We will then follow the evolutionary history of humans, from the earliest vertebrates in the Cambrian seas, to the colonization of land in the Devonian, to the radiation of mammals after the extinction of the dinosaurs, to the evolution of humans over the last five million years. We will finish the semester by considering the Anthropocene, the period in history during which ecosystems have been primarily affected by human activities – how we got to where we are now, and where we can go from here.
Requirements Satisfied: Non-Lab Natural Science and Foundational Writing and Information Literacy
 

 

Geology

GEOL 011 A —Geology with Google Earth ™
Instructor: John Hughes

The Earth is a dynamic planet, and scientists have learned much about the Earth by "stepping back" and viewing it from afar, from space. Such a view is now afforded to laypersons, through the use of Google Earth. This course will provide a description of the dynamic processes that have shaped our planet, and, where appropriate, view the results of those processes from space using Google Earth. This will allow us to gain a perspective of the Earth that we have only recently obtained, and also to view the results of 4.6 billion years of dynamic processes on Earth. As learning partners, Professor Hughes and student colleagues will explore planet Earth as geologists, unraveling the history of the Earth by understanding the processes that have shaped it as it is today.
Requirements Satisfied: Non-Lab Natural Science and Foundational Writing and Information Literacy