Classroom

TAP is a writing-intensive elective program for first-year students in the College of Arts and Sciences that combines an interactive course environment with careful academic advising. In the fall semester, students enroll in one TAP seminar on a topic of common interest. TAP seminars encourage students to approach major issues from a variety of points of view by developing creative projects and expressing what they learned through speech and writing. The professor, who also serves as an academic advisor, helps further explore a student's interests and academic goals. All TAP seminars satisfy the University's Writing and Information Literacy Requirement and many also satisfy one of the College’s Distribution Requirements (Fine Arts, Humanities, Natural Science, or Social Science).

Fall 2017 Teacher-Advisor Program (TAP) Seminars

Fine Arts

Art and Art History

ARTH 096 A —Why Build That?
Instructor: William Mierse

Buildings represent the most expensive kinds of art works on which societies can expend their collective resources. Buildings tend to last, too often outlast those who built them, and to outlast their initial purposes. Many factors—societal, economic, aesthetic, practical, and personal—influence the choices that are made about what to build and how to build it. In this class we will examine the ways in which these various forces and others have informed architectural choices. We will explore the big ideas and investigate specific case studies. The class will be discussion-based around required readings. Participants will be evaluated on their informed engagement in the discussions and their work in a variety of formats including, but not limited to, group work, individual written and oral projects, and research papers.
Requirements Satisfied: Fine Arts or Humanities and Writing and Information Literacy
 

ARTS 003 A —Three-Dimensional Studies
Instructor: Shelley Warren

Architecture, sculpture, fashion or furniture design, enter the three-dimensional world of design! Learn how most everything in our constructed environment was created by an artist and how they all share the same organizing principals of design. In this ‘laboratory’ studio you will be both designer and maker, experimenting with a wide range of traditional and non-traditional materials. Projects will be carefully developed from concept to sketch or model, to handcrafted finished products in our studio. Assignments will be introduced with demonstrations on technical processes and use of materials. Exposure to current international artists through visual media presentations are used to exemplify project assignments. We visit museums and/or galleries to learn how to critically analyze a three-dimensional work of art and to apply the very same analysis to our own work.
Requirements Satisfied: Fine Arts and Writing and Information Literacy
 

ARTS 095 A —Intro to Wheel Throwing
Instructor: Hoyt Barringer

In this course, the potter's wheel is used as the primary forming process for making functional and sculptural stoneware pieces. What makes a well-thrown form technically and sculpturally? How do we determine proper proportion, form and function? Provided is an experience with process and materials that develop the necessary skills enabling students to connect hand and eye with heart and mind. Visual, tactile and historical possibilities are explored using local and refined slips, oxides, and high fire glazes. Tools may be purchased at the UVM Bookstore.
Requirements Satisfied: Fine Arts and Writing and Information Literacy
 

 

Dance

DNCE 095 A —Dance in the Contemporary World
Instructor: Paul Besaw

Description coming soon.
Requirements Satisfied: Fine Arts and Writing and Information Literacy
 

 

Film and Television Studies

FTS 095 A —Film, Culture, Society
Instructor: Hyon Yoo

In this class we'll explore how films make meaning from social and cultural perspectives and discuss how film as a social and cultural practice represents issues closely related to our understanding of humanity, including gender, sexuality, race and class. We'll read and discuss books like Practice of Looking: An Introduction to Visual Culture (a book about how we interpret visual images), Feminist Film Theory (a book about how we ask questions about gender and sexuality), Richard Dyer’s White (a book about whiteness) and Roland Barthes’s Mythologies (a book about how our accepted ways of thinking about ourselves and the world are socially constructed). We will use concepts from these readings in our analyses of films such as Fight Club, Princess Mononoke and more.
Requirements Satisfied: Fine Arts and Writing and Information Literacy
 

 

Global and Regional Studies

GRS 095 A —Post World War II Italian Cinema
Instructor: Antonello Borra

With its beginnings already at the end of the 19th century, the history of Italian cinema runs parallel to the history of cinema itself. From Giovanni Pastrone’s masterpiece Cabiria, dating back to 1914, to post-WW II Neorealism and late 60’s Spaghetti Western Italian cinema has been a constant source of inspiration for the greatest filmmakers of all times and contemporary American directors like Martin Scorsese and Quentin Tarantino have at different times recognized their own debt to the work of their Italian colleagues. In fact, Roberto Rossellini, Vittorio De Sica, Luchino Visconti, Federico Fellini, Michelangelo Antonioni, and Pier Paolo Pasolini are directors whose influence well transcends national boundaries and whose accomplishments are among the most representative of the history of the medium. This course will concentrate on some of the most celebrated movies of all times, classics like Open City and The Bicycle Thieves, as well as movies less known to the general American public but just as influential like, for example, Pietro Germi’s Divorzio all’italiana or Mario Monicelli’s I soliti ignoti. Following mostly a chronological perspective each week we will concentrate on a different filmmaker and work on a specific movie analyzing its historical, cultural, as well as cinematic peculiarities together with its relationship to other films by the same director. Students will be able to watch the movies on their own time and class will be devoted to short lectures, discussions, and students’ presentations. Students will be asked to read critical material relevant to the history of Italian cinema and at the same time reflect in a more personal way on the narrative structures of the individual films.
Requirements Satisfied: Fine Arts and Writing and Information Literacy
 

 

Theatre

THE 010 A —Acting I: Intro to Acting
Instructor: Sarah Carleton

How does one effectively persuade an audience of a fictional truth? How does an actor transform into a character and communicate it to the audience? What is acting? This course begins to answer these questions. Students participate in exercises to increase self-awareness and to heighten perceptions of human behavior, and learn the basics of script analysis and development of vocal and physical skills through practice and performance. Students read Uta Hagen and attend a minimum of three Theatre Department productions. Registration is restricted to Theatre majors and minors.
Requirements Satisfied: Fine Arts and Writing and Information Literacy
 

THE 095 A —Audience and Critical Eye
Instructor: Jeffrey Modereger

Theatre is a form of entertainment where the audience is as important as the actor and the script. In this class we, the audience, study the many facets of live performance by attending productions around the Burlington area. We consider how the play text has been translated into performance by analyzing the choices made by directors, actors, designers, and the choreographers. We also consider the kinds of questions the performance asks: What ideas within the play are being communicated? How do those ideas express or connect with our time and place? Is the playwright, director, or choreographer trying to communicate a message about our society, and how have the choices made in the production expressed that message? As the audience, we engage with the makers of theatre and learn how we affect their work. By learning how to be educated audience members, we can better understand what is expected of us.

GOAL: To leave this class appreciating live performances, understanding how they reflect society, and how they can initiate critical thought and public discourse. By the time they complete this course students will be able to
• Critically analyze a production by applying Aristotle’s 6 elements of Drama as outlined in The Poetics
• Gain a working knowledge of the process of production from page to stage
• Understand the relationship between the audience and the play in the context of community and culture
• Understand personal opinion is more than a matter of taste but based in substantiated facts
Requirements Satisfied: Fine Arts and Writing and Information Literacy
 

 

 

Humanities

Classics

CLAS 095 B —Ancient Drama
Instructor: Angeline Chiu

How far is too far in the pursuit of revenge? What is the nature of justice? How can human beings wrestle with the consequences of their choices and actions? Can there ever be peace in the battle of the sexes? These are just a few of the ever-relevant questions that ancient Greek playwrights put on stage. From tragedy to comedy and back (Oh, don't forget the lawyer jokes, celebrity lampoons, and political satire!), the Athenians of the fifth-century BC pioneered an art form that still fascinates us today. In this course we will study the context, history, and lasting cultural influence of ancient Greek drama by reading a selection of comic and tragic plays by Aeschylus, Sophocles, Euripides, Aristophanes, and Menander.
Requirements Satisfied: Humanities and Writing and Information Literacy
 

CLAS 095 A —Alexandria: City of Wonders
Instructor: Brian Walsh

The very presence in Egypt of two of the ancient world’s seven wonders in Egypt (created more than 2,000 years apart!), one still submerged in Alexandria’s harbor, justifies the title of this course, which seeks to investigate the rich layers and nuances of this second eternal city and its pivotal role in the history of the ancient and modern worlds. Conceived of and planned by Alexander the Great - who did not live to see it - Alexandria became a primary center of intellectual and scientific inquiry, artistic and architectural experimentation, religious spirit and conflict, social complexity, linguistic diversity, and economic power. Careful investigation of Alexandria’s wonders - both visible and submerged - and its long evolution will shed considerable rays of light on our present globalized economic, scientific, religious and secular, post-colonial, multi-ethnic world. Our search will consider all the peoples, ideas and materials that made Alexandria wondrous - from the native Egyptians to Greek, Jewish, Roman, Byzantine, Islamic, and European settlers and soldiers, dynasts and merchants, tourists and pilgrims, and many others.
Requirements Satisfied: Humanities and Writing and Information Literacy
 

 

Critical Race and Ethnic Studies

CRES 095 I (cross-listed with HST 095 A)—Reel and Real Indians
Instructor: David Massell

This seminar explores the depiction of North American Indians in film. Its objectives are three-fold: to hone our skills as writers; to become more critical observers of commercial film; and to explore a compelling slice of North American cultural history, namely how North American Native Peoples were portrayed, objectified, even invented, by mainstream Euro-Americans, from the nineteenth century to the present, and how Natives themselves responded and ultimately pushed back against such stereotypes. The seminar’s opening unit includes a field trip to the Odanak Indian Reserve in Quebec.
Requirements Satisfied: Humanities and Writing and Information Literacy
 

 

English

ENGS 005 C —Food and Writing
Instructor: Libby Miles

Food, glorious food. At its best, food nourishes and sustains us, it provides a sense of place and cultural identity, it tantalizes and delights, and can even take us on sensory explorations to other worlds. But it can also be fraught with peril: disorders, toxins, and social injustice. In this class, we will immerse ourselves in the writing that surrounds food, such as narratives, recipes, treatises, research studies, documentaries, and blogs. Students will read, research, and write a range of discourses that explore different aspects of food in our lives, and the lives of those around us.
Requirements Satisfied: Humanities and Writing and Information Literacy
 

ENGS 005 D —Writers at Work
Instructor: Susan Harrington

Good writers are curious and good writers talk with others about the art, craft, and choices they make. Through practice, reading, and conversation we’ll cultivate curiosity—developing habits of mind that encourage us to think deeply and widely. We’ll read and write non-fiction; we'll share work with each other regularly; we’ll playfully compose and seriously confront complicated ideas. You’ll have the chance to develop questions, pursue curiosities, and cultivate your voice. The course requires regular writing and reading. Writing review groups will be active weekly; learning how to give and receive feedback—and how feedback helps writers create texts and develop ideas—is a major theme in our work. Expect weekly shorts that are gradually revised into longer essays.
Requirements Satisfied: Humanities and Writing and Information Literacy
 

ENGS 005 A (cross-listed with GSWS 095 B) —Gender, Sexuality in American Poetry
Instructor: Eve Alexandra

In this introduction to American poetry, special consideration will be given to poets/poetic movements seeking to establish, interrogate, and complicate identity through the lens of gender and sexuality. This is a literature class with a creative writing component. Grades will be based on participation, presentations, and writing assignments.
Requirements Satisfied: Literature and Writing and Information Literacy
 

ENGS 005 B —Graphic Novels and Narrative Theory
Instructor: Daniel Fogel

Over the course of this seminar, we will read six graphic novels—Art Spiegelman’s Maus (two volumes), Alison Bechdel’s Fun Home and Are You My Mother?, and Jason Lutes’s Berlin: City of Stone and Berlin: City of Smoke—along with H. Porter Abbott’s Cambridge Introduction to Narrative in order to explore a few key questions: Why is story-telling central to human life? Why do we value story-telling so highly, and how does each of the graphic novels we read fulfill the criteria of value we have identified? What is the use of theorizing about narratives, and what is the value and power of applying systematic and rigorous analytic terms to the study of narrative? And what must we do to supplement the formal, structural study of narratives in order to honor the specificity of historical, economic, sociological, political, cultural, anthropological, legal, philosophical and other pertinent contexts essential for understanding the works.
Requirements Satisfied: Literature and Writing and Information Literacy
 

ENGS 005 F —Tolkien and the Problem of Modernity
Instructor: Mary Kete

Tolkien’s fantasy takes us beyond the confines of time and space through story telling. We will be interrogating Tolkien’s engagement with the cultural debates of the first half of the 20th-century and we will be thinking about how our engagement with Tolkien participates in the cultural debates of this new century. This seminar has two related goals. The first is to examine the contexts (historical, political and aesthetic) within which Tolkien imagined his epic while we examine the context within which we read his epic. The second is to improve our ability to understand the components of narrative in order to how storytelling works. In addition to Tolkien, we will be reading primary works by authors such as Orwell, Hemingway, Adams, Eliot, Yeats, Marinetti, Owen, Benjamin, Hitler, Mosley and Sassoon.
Requirements Satisfied: Literature and Writing and Information Literacy
 

ENGS 005 G —What is Literature?
Instructor: Helen Scott

While the category ‘literature’ may seem self evident, it is both historically new and remarkably hard to define. This seminar explores the origins and development of the modern concept of a distinct realm of ‘literary’ writing. We shall read examples of the major genres—narrative fiction, poetry and drama—by a historically and geographically diverse selection of writers in English. We shall examine debates about literary interpretation and value while practicing close reading and contextualization of our selected works.
Requirements Satisfied: Literature and Writing and Information Literacy
 

ENGS 005 H&K —Writing Science and Nature
Instructor: Jenny Grosvenor

We write in order to share information, yes, but also to make meaning of our lives in connection with the myriad happenings around us—the web of life. In this nature-, medicine-, and science-based composition course, we’ll do just that: utilize writing to increase understanding—others’ and our own. The focus, for the most part, will be on sustainability—encompassing environmental concerns, medical practices, ecological literacy, and social connection. In the words of physicist and prolific writer, Fritjof Capra, the objective will be “to develop a conceptual framework that integrates the biological, cognitive, and social dimensions of life.” Through various forms of writing, we’ll learn to keep a close eye on detail, to recognize the wait—what? moments, and then translate those into writing that creates a desired cause-and-effect in your intended audience. We’ll gain insight into systematic understandings of life and learn to think in terms of patterns and networks. Through imitation and the writing process, we’ll learn the craft of employing the written word not simply for education and comprehension but so that sustainability-based narratives become touchstones to the deepest of human concerns and values—as well as action and hope for change. How did they do it? We’ll ponder and then track scientific queries and pluck ideas from the rich pasture of nature and the environment. How does this impact the quality of life over time? What can I do? This sort of wonder will fuel our explorations and discoveries and direct us toward solutions and recreation—all through writing, itself a life-sustaining pursuit.
Requirements Satisfied: Writing and Information Literacy and Sustainability
 

ENGS 005 I —Contemporary Irish Literature
Instructor: Angela Patten

In 2016, Ireland will celebrate the centenary of the Easter Rising, a landmark moment in Irish history that precipitated full independence from Great Britain in 1948. Since then, the country has endured many changes—from a national education system run by the Catholic Church to clerical abuse scandals that have eroded trust in religious institutions; from the poverty and hardship of the early 20th century to the financial exhilaration of the Celtic Tiger in the mid-1990s to the mid-2000s and back to a debilitating recession; from an insular island nation on the western edge of Europe to a full-fledged member of the European Union; and, through the rapid growth of industry, technology and mass media, from a localized culture to a global one. Yet despite all these upheavals, the Irish predilection for language and storytelling has flourished and the work of Irish poets, writers, musicians and artists continues to be celebrated at home and abroad. For a comparatively small place, the island of Ireland has made a disproportionate contribution to world literature. This course is designed to introduce students to contemporary Irish literature through the work of poets like Seamus Heaney and Eavan Boland, and fiction writers like Roddy Doyle, Colm Toibin and Kevin Barry. Readings will be supplemented with excerpts from Irish film and frequent references to Irish history to provide context and encourage discussion of the ways in which poets and writers examine and influence personal and national identity. Through a wide variety of styles and subject-matter, contemporary Irish poets and writers look back to an illustrious literary tradition and forward to new body of writing that reflects a country coping with the benefits and burdens of globalization.
Requirements Satisfied: Literature and Writing and Information Literacy
 

ENGS 005 J —Beyond Big Brother
Instructor: Sean Witters

George Orwell's Nineteen Eighty-Four has a controlling presence in traditions of "dystopian fiction" and in out culture's vision of power. His depiction of "Big Brother" is a nearly universal image in our culture and is now intertwined with our very notion of what mass power is. This presents a set of dilemmas for writers, readers, and thinkers alike as they approach the genre and explore its insights into power, human nature, and modern life. Our work will use this situation as the source of our shared inquiry. Reading and viewing over a century of dystopian narratives, including novels and films by Yevgeny Zamyatin, Aldous Huxley, George Orwell, Margaret Atwood, P.K. Dick, Terry Gilliam, the Wachowskis, and Suzanne Collins, we will explore the genre’s engagement with narratives of power and rebellion, tracing its ideological, satirical, philosophical, and imaginative functions. In our writing and reading, we will give particular attention to re-interpretation of this tradition in our own historical and social condition, exploring the limits of paranoia and the power of "reparative" readings that might open new windows onto the text and the world. Planned required books include*: Atwood, "The Handmaid's Tale" Collins, "The Hunger Games" Huxley, "Brave New World" Orwell, "Nineteen Eighty-Four" Zamyatin, "We" We will also use a writing guide: Peter Elbow, "Writing with Power." *These are the core readings, but the list may change slightly.
Requirements Satisfied: Literature and Writing and Information Literacy
 

 

Gender, Sexuality and Women's Studies

GSWS 095 D (cross-listed with HST 095 C) —Women's History
Instructor: Melanie Gustafson

This seminar provides an introduction to American women’s political and social activism from the nineteenth century to today. It begins with an examination of the anti-slavery and women’s rights movements before the Civil War, continues with a focus on the struggle for the right to vote and the subsequent battles for political inclusion, and culminates with a discussion of the rise of global feminism. The course is designed to introduce students to important leaders and their ideas, the evolution of movements for equal rights and social justice, and key political moments in American women’s history. We will use historical methodologies, which means exploring how and why changes occurred and the impact of change on the lives of ordinary people and the nation. Students will work individually and in groups on research assignments.
Requirements Satisfied: Humanities and Writing and Information Literacy
 

GSWS 095 A (cross-listed with HS 017 A & WLIT 017 B) —Women and Nazi Germany
Instructor: Helga Schreckenberger

Women played a wide spectrum of roles during National Socialism: they were perpetrators (e.g., convinced party members, brutal concentration camp guards), bystanders and fellow travelers of the Nazi ideology, victims (due to their race, their sexual orientation, or their political or religious views), and resistance fighters. Drawing on a variety of readings (fiction and non-fiction) and films (documentary and feature films), we will reconstruct the Nazis’ idea of “womanhood” and examine the different experiences and options of women living under the National Socialist regime.
Requirements Satisfied: Literature and Writing and Information Literacy
 

GSWS 095 B (cross-listed with ENGS 005 A) —Gender, Sexuality in American Poetry
Instructor: Eve Alexandra

In this introduction to American poetry, special consideration will be given to poets/poetic movements seeking to establish, interrogate, and complicate identity through the lens of gender and sexuality. This is a literature class with a creative writing component. Grades will be based on participation, presentations, and writing assignments.
Requirements Satisfied: Literature and Writing and Information Literacy
 

 

History

HST 095 A (cross-listed with CRES 095 I) —Reel and Real Indians
Instructor: David Massell

This seminar explores the depiction of North American Indians in film. Its objectives are three-fold: to hone our skills as writers; to become more critical observers of commercial film; and to explore a compelling slice of North American cultural history, namely how North American Native Peoples were portrayed, objectified, even invented, by mainstream Euro-Americans, from the nineteenth century to the present, and how Natives themselves responded and ultimately pushed back against such stereotypes. The seminar’s opening unit includes a field trip to the Odanak Indian Reserve in Quebec.
Requirements Satisfied: Humanities and Writing and Information Literacy
 

HST 095 B —Revolutionary Ideologies in the 20th Century
Instructor: Frank Nicosia

This is an intellectual history course designed to help students understand some of the significant revolutionary ideas and movements that shaped the history of the 20th century. The course will examine four of the totalitarian revolutionary ideologies and movements in the 20th century: Marxism-Leninism in the Soviet Union, Fascism in Italy, National Socialism in Germany, and Maoism in China. These modern ideologies, and the movements they spawned, are just four of the many variations, negative and positive, that grew out of the 18th century intellectual revolution known as the Enlightenment. Its promise of liberation of the people and establishment of utopian societies, first attempted during the French and American revolutions in the 18th century, remained a key driving force in the history of the 20th century, and continue in the 21st century. The first two weeks cover the Enlightenment and French Revolution, with students reading primary source documents of Enlightenment philosophers and leaders of the French Revolution. This is followed by three weeks each for Marxism-Leninism in the Soviet Union, Fascism in Italy, National Socialism in Germany, and Maoism in China. Students will consider their similarities and differences. In each of these four sections of the course, they will read some of the writings of Karl Marx and of Vladimir Lenin and Josef Stalin in Russia, of Benito Mussolini in Italy, of Adolf Hitler and other Nazis in Germany, and of Mao Zedong in China. Students will also examine how these four ideologies grew out of the same Enlightenment ideas and ideals that also gave us constitutional government, political democracy, and democratic socialism.
Requirements Satisfied: Humanities and Writing and Information Literacy
 

HST 095 C (cross-listed with GSWS 095 D) —Women's History
Instructor: Melanie Gustafson

This seminar provides an introduction to American women’s political and social activism from the nineteenth century to today. It begins with an examination of the anti-slavery and women’s rights movements before the Civil War, continues with a focus on the struggle for the right to vote and the subsequent battles for political inclusion, and culminates with a discussion of the rise of global feminism. The course is designed to introduce students to important leaders and their ideas, the evolution of movements for equal rights and social justice, and key political moments in American women’s history. We will use historical methodologies, which means exploring how and why changes occurred and the impact of change on the lives of ordinary people and the nation. Students will work individually and in groups on research assignments.
Requirements Satisfied: Humanities and Writing and Information Literacy
 

 

Holocaust Studies

HS 017 A (cross-listed with GSWS 095 A & WLIT 017 B)—Women and Nazi Germany
Instructor: Helga Schreckenberger

Women played a wide spectrum of roles during National Socialism: they were perpetrators (e.g., convinced party members, brutal concentration camp guards), bystanders and fellow travelers of the Nazi ideology, victims (due to their race, their sexual orientation, or their political or religious views), and resistance fighters. Drawing on a variety of readings (fiction and non-fiction) and films (documentary and feature films), we will reconstruct the Nazis’ idea of “womanhood” and examine the different experiences and options of women living under the National Socialist regime.
Requirements Satisfied: Literature and Writing and Information Literacy
 

 

Philosophy

PHIL 010 C&D —Ethics of Eating
Instructor: Tyler Doggett

Unlike breathing or sleeping or various other things we have to do to stay alive, eating is ethically problematic. The course explains why. Topics will include the ethics of factory farming and free-range farming and of growing plants in various ways. Some more general ethical topics—consequentialism, deontology, rights—will show up, too. Grades will most likely come from a series of short writing assignments and three exams, but we will hammer out the details together.
Requirements Satisfied: Humanities and Writing and Information Literacy
 

PHIL 010 E&F —Skepticism
Instructor: Don Loeb

This course focuses on skeptical challenges in a number of prominent areas. After examining Bertrand Russel's controversial definition of philosophy, we spend several classes examining Socrates' Defense (The Apology), by Plato. Socrates was tried and put to death for being a philosopher. At his trial he made the outrageous claim that he was the wisest man in Athens and suggested that his punishment should be maintenance for life at the state’s expense! THE APOLOGY represents Socrates's (somewhat cryptic) defense of a philosophical worldview. While we are discussing THE APOLOGY, we go through some very basic logic (mostly deductive but also inductive) and consider some prominent fallacies of reasoning. We move on to moral skepticism and consider the possibility that morality is not a realm of fact, but of taste or attitude. I argue that although the issue is interesting, from a practical point of view it needn’t affect our moral concerns and behavior much at all. As an illustration of this point and also of Socrates’s claim that we are much less wise than we think, we consider the contemporary debate over abortion, and I argue that most of what people say about this issue is seriously confused. If I am right, we are less wise than we think, as Socrates suggested. We go on to consider some more promising, philosophical approaches to some of the moral questions surrounding abortion. Next, we turn to philosophy of religion. If time permits, we consider arguments for (and against) the existence of God. We also ask whether religion can play the roles in moral thinking it is often claimed to play. Finally we turn to the sorts of global skeptical concerns raised by Descartes and Hume. Does one have good reason to believe that one has a body, that the world exists outside of one’s own mind, that there are other people, and that the future will be like the past? Descartes and Hume are extremely important philosophers who raised serious worries about our knowledge in these areas. We will consider some of their most important arguments.
Requirements Satisfied: Humanities and Writing and Information Literacy
 

Political Science

POLS 041 A&B —Intro to Political Theory
Instructor: Jan Feldman

Political philosophy is systematic thinking about the purposes of government, not just a description of its functions and institutions. It is an investigation into the nature of justice and what sort of government can best achieve it. The questions that have engaged Western political philosophers for the past 2,000 years have been remarkably constant, though their answers have differed dramatically due to their differing conceptions of human nature and the purpose of human communities. This course presents the opportunity to explore questions of deep and enduring significance from the perspective of great representative thinkers of the Western tradition.
Requirements Satisfied: Humanities and Writing and Information Literacy
 

 

Religion

REL 020 A —Comparing Religions: Wheel and Cross
Instructor: Kevin Trainor

Whatever our religious backgrounds, most of us in the U.S. probably feel much more familiar with Christianity than Buddhism, and tend to separate the two traditions along a great East-West divide. This course aims to complicate that perspective. It provides an introduction to the study of religion through a detailed comparative analysis of these two traditions, illuminating some surprising similarities as well as important differences in their histories and practices. Students will have the opportunity to complete a ritual research project and present their research to the class.
Requirements Satisfied: Humanities, Writing and Information Literacy, and (D2) Non-European Cultures
 

REL 023 A —What Is the Bible?
Instructor: Anne Clark

It’s one of the most influential books in human history, but what is it? We will explore how the the Jewish and Christian Bibles were produced in the communities of ancient Israel and the Christian movement, as those people grappled with the deepest problems of existence. This course will serve as an introduction to the study of religion through an examination of selected biblical and related texts and the cultures that produced and preserved these texts. Throughout the course, we will ask questions about the nature of religion and about understanding the religious expressions of people of other cultures and historical periods. We will examine the religious beliefs of the peoples of the ancient Babylon, then turn to our major focus on the development of ancient Israel and the emergence of the Christian movement. In looking at each of these closely related yet strikingly diverse religious cultures, we will try to understand how the evidence of their beliefs and practices allows us to construct a picture of what we call religion. In investigating these religious traditions, we will examine how the identity of each community was articulated, especially in terms of boundaries defining insiders and outsiders. We will consider how people engaged religious symbols to organize their societies including aspects of personal identity and social hierarchies. Our investigations will begin with the problem of defining religion and the ways in which our own position in the 21st-century West must be examined so that we can both see very different ways of formulating the nature of reality and refrain from assuming an inherent bias against the past (e.g., as “backward”) or religion (e.g., “as irrational or superstitious”).
Requirements Satisfied: Humanities, Writing and Information Literacy, and (D2) Non-European Cultures
 

REL 095 A —Altars of Black Atlantic
Instructor: Vicki Brennan

This course explores religions of the Black Atlantic world--including Yoruba oriṣa, Cuban Santeria, Haitian vodou, and Brazilian Candomblé, among others--from the perspective of material culture. In particular, we will focus on the politics and poetics of altars, looking at how objects are constructed, assembled, and employed in complex and elaborate displays that serve as “the face of the gods;” physical and material sites through which practitioners aesthetically and ritually engage with spirits. Altars provide a lens into understanding issues of colonialism, globalization, and transnationalism; race, sexuality, and nation-hood; and broader questions of human nature, sociality and the world. In conjunction with the exhibition of “Sacred Arts of the Black Atlantic” which will be installed in the main gallery of UVM’s Fleming Museum in the fall of 2017, students will have the opportunity to observe and participate in the construction and installation of altars by practitioners and to examine sacred objects and rituals first hand.
Requirements Satisfied: Humanities and Writing and Information Literacy
 

REL 095 B —Religion on the Screen
Instructor: Erica Andrus

Course description coming soon.
Requirements Satisfied: Humanities and Writing and Information Literacy
 

 

World Literature

WLIT 017 B (cross-listed with GSWS 095 A & HS 017 A)—Women and Nazi Germany
Instructor: Helga Schreckenberger

Women played a wide spectrum of roles during National Socialism: they were perpetrators (e.g., convinced party members, brutal concentration camp guards), bystanders and fellow travelers of the Nazi ideology, victims (due to their race, their sexual orientation, or their political or religious views), and resistance fighters. Drawing on a variety of readings (fiction and non-fiction) and films (documentary and feature films), we will reconstruct the Nazis’ idea of “womanhood” and examine the different experiences and options of women living under the National Socialist regime.
Requirements Satisfied: Literature and Writing and Information Literacy
 

WLIT 095 A —Virtue & Violence in Chinese Literature
Instructor: Thomas Noel

Why have ritualized performances of violence been transformed into exemplars of virtue in the Chinese literary tradition? How have these violent practices, techniques, stratagems, doctrines, and the texts that describe such “martial arts” become tools for both physical and intellectual self-cultivation? Perhaps most importantly, how have literary depictions of the martial arts come to serve as hermeneutic bridges between the “martial” and “civil” spheres that govern the Chinese tradition? This course will attempt to provide answers for these questions, while using the portrayal of "virtuous violence" and the “martial arts” in the history of Chinese literature as an introductory glimpse into the complex array of phenomena that have defined Chinese Civilization from it’s very beginnings.
Requirements Satisfied: Literature and Writing and Information Literacy
 

WLIT 095 B —European Fairy Tales Old and New
Instructor: Cristina Mazzoni

You are probably very familiar with the stories of Cinderella, Sleeping Beauty, and Rapunzel, but you may not realize that the oldest versions of these tales come from Renaissance Italy. More interestingly, few people know that the first Cinderella murdered her own stepmother by crushing her skull with the lid of a trunk; that the original Sleeping Beauty was raped and impregnated by a king married to someone else; and that Rapunzel, in the earliest version of the tale, drugged with opium the ogress so she could have sex with the prince who climbed up the tower on her long braids. In this course, we will read these and other tale types from the European tradition (including “Beauty and the Beast” and “Little Red Riding Hood”), and watch some of the most compelling of their film adaptations. Students in this course will do the following, both orally and in writing: describe the origins, structure, meanings, and historical development of European fairy tales as a literary genre; retell a number of classic European fairy tales, highlighting in the process the differences between versions from various times and places, and some of the reasons for these differences; analyze fairy tales according to a variety of critical approaches, including structuralist, feminist, and psychoanalytic. Because this is a seminar-style course, class participation counts heavily towards the final grade, and students will be expected to do all readings and prepare all discussion questions before each class meeting. The rest of the grade is determined by two oral presentations, three short essays, a class journal, a midterm, and a final.
Requirements Satisfied: Literature and Writing and Information Literacy
 

 

 

Social Sciences

Economics

EC 020 A —Economics of Space Exploration
Instructor: Bill Gibson

This course examines the costs and benefits of manned and unmanned space exploration. We address the question of the economic and scientific opportunities afforded by space exploration, and the trade-offs involved with social programs on Earth. The central focus of the course is on the public policy question of the proper relationship between NASA as a government agency and the emerging private launch industry. Students will be introduced to a range of basic economic tools and concepts, such as opportunity costs, cost-benefit analysis, and public goods. The course will cover space vehicle technology, and provide an introduction to orbital mechanics, and cutting-edge technologies such as carbon nanotube space elevators, scam jets, and solar sails. The Russian space program’s successes and failures are covered in some detail.
Requirements Satisfied: Social Sciences and Writing and Information Literacy
 

EC 040 B & C —Economics of Globalization
Instructor: Richard Sicotte

Students will investigate key economic aspects of globalization: trade, migration and finance. We begin by surveying the size, direction and composition of international trade flows. We will consider the economic basis for such flows, and discuss which individuals likely gain or lose (on net) from trade. We will also study major international trade agreements, including the World Trade Organization, the North American Free Trade Agreement, and the Trans-Pacific Partnership. Next we study the flows of legal and illegal migration around the world, with a special focus on flows to the United States. We will analyze the causes of migration to the U.S., and its consequences for native-born U.S. workers. Our study of international finance will begin with a detailed examination of the balance of payments, which is the account of all of the international transactions of a country’s citizens, businesses, and governments. The balance of payments concept is crucial to explain a country’s exchange rate, trade balance, and international debt, each of which feature prominently in the media and in political debates. We carefully study each. We conclude the course with a brief overview of the economics of international environmental challenges, especially climate change.
Requirements Satisfied: Social Sciences, Writing and Information Literacy, (D2) Non-European Cultures, and Sustainability

 

Gender, Sexuality and Women's Studies

GSWS 001 A —Gender, Sexuality and Women's Studies
Instructor: Annika Ljung-Baruth

This course introduces the basic vocabulary of Gender, Sexuality, and Women's Studies through an exploration of central questions in the field. What is the difference between sex and gender and how are the two related? What are sexual and gender identities? How are sex, gender, and sexuality shaped by society, culture, and history? What is their relationship to politics? How do gender and sexuality intersect with each other as well as with other aspects of identity/experience like race and class? What is meant by terms like sexism, heterosexism, heteronormativity, homonormativity, and cisgender privilege? How are sex, gender, and sexuality created and maintained in mainstream culture? How have social movements challenged and changed norms around gender and sexuality? We will explore these and other questions throughout this semester-long introduction to the interdisciplinary field of Gender, Sexuality, and Women's Studies.
Requirements Satisfied: Social Sciences, Writing and Information Literacy
 

GSWS 001 C —Gender, Sexuality and Women's Studies
Instructor: Ellen Andersen

This course introduces the basic vocabulary of Gender, Sexuality, and Women's Studies through an exploration of central questions in the field. What is the difference between sex and gender and how are the two related? What are sexual and gender identities? How are sex, gender, and sexuality shaped by society, culture, and history? What is their relationship to politics? How do gender and sexuality intersect with each other as well as with other aspects of identity/experience like race and class? What is meant by terms like sexism, heterosexism, heteronormativity, homonormativity, and cisgender privilege? How are sex, gender, and sexuality created and maintained in mainstream culture? How have social movements challenged and changed norms around gender and sexuality? We will explore these and other questions throughout this semester-long introduction to the interdisciplinary field of Gender, Sexuality, and Women's Studies.
Requirements Satisfied: Social Sciences, Writing and Information Literacy
 

 

Political Science

POLS 051 A —Intro International Relations
Instructor: Michele Commercio

This is an exciting and historically unique time to be studying international relations. International institutions like NATO and the EU are experiencing unanticipated political, economic, and social consequences of expansion, including border closings in reaction to a wave of refugees. Britain, in an historical referendum, voted to leave the EU. Russia is asserting itself abroad, particularly in Syria; and US intelligence agencies claim it did so prior to the US 2016 presidential elections. China continues to assert its financial power in the international arena. September 11, once a critical benchmark in determining American foreign policy in the Middle East, is less important today in this realm. The war in Syria, once a domestic dispute, has transformed into a transnational war with no political solution in sight. North Korea and Iran continue to present challenges to the West, although the U.S. and Iran are in the midst of an alliance-building process following the signing of a controversial nuclear deal. After decades of mutual hostility and distrust, the US and Cuba are building a relationship marked by the 2015 opening of a US embassy in Havana. And in a move unprecedented since WWII, in 2014 Russia redrew the map of Europe when it annexed Crimea. Last, but certainly not least, our semester begins with the inauguration of President Trump, who promises to have an impact on international relations. The purpose of this course is to provide you with the theoretical tools necessary to critically analyze the conflict and cooperation that characterize world politics. This course will address a number of important questions regarding how states interact with each other, and how states interact with non-state actors such as the United Nations. We will explore competing explanations for state behavior, such as realism and liberalism, as well as theories addressing the same questions including hegemonic stability theory, international regime theory, democratic peace theory, and the strategic model as it relates to terrorism.
Requirements Satisfied: Social Sciences and Writing and Information Literacy
 

POLS 071 A&B —Comparative Political Systems
Instructor: Peter VonDoepp

In this TAP course, we will explore and learn to understand political phenomena in different settings around the world. On the one hand, we will obtain a better grasp of major differences between political systems, building our conceptual vocabulary and research skills so that we can more effectively discuss and describe politics in different countries. On the other hand, we will learn and apply techniques and theories that can account for differences among countries. Questions we will explore include:  Why does authoritarianism persist in the Arab world? Why has democracy failed to take hold in Russia? Why does the United States lack a European-style welfare state? Why have some countries achieved peace and stability while others have not? In answering these, students will not only learn about important issues, but also improve their ability to make informed evaluations about politics outside the United States.
Requirements Satisfied: Social Sciences and Writing and Information Literacy
 

POLS 095 B —The Politics of Environmentalism
Instructor: Robert Bartlett

Environmentalism is a social movement that coalesced in the 1960s and has been politically significant ever since. In this course we will examine the continuing impact of environmentalism on modern politics. We will analyze the changing nature and trajectory of environmentalism, its internal contradictions and coherence, its critics, its support in the larger society, its connections to other social movements, and its impact on policy and governance. We will explore why some scholars argue that “Only politics can save the environment.” Readings will include The Politics of the Earth, Globalization and the Environment, and Miniature Guide to Critical Thinking. Students will need to read the New York Times at least three days each week. Grades will be based on attendance and participation, three short essays, and contributions to a readings journal, a current events journal, and online discussion board.
Requirements Satisfied: Social Sciences and Writing and Information Literacy
 

 

Psychological Science

PSYS 095 A —Meanings of Madness
Instructor: Judith Christiansen

Why use such a pejorative term as “madness” for the title of this course? This term has long history and illustrates the stigma often associated with mental health diagnoses. Using historical assessments, cultural differences worldwide, and psychological science research examining gender, race and other sources of bias, students will use this multi-perspective approach to understand what is behind mental health stigma and will examine ways to break down such destructive stereotypes and treatment barriers. 1. Establish a comprehensive understanding of gender, race, culture and other sources of bias that contribute to mental health stigma. Develop and apply an understanding of cultural competency as one means to reduce and eliminate mental health stigma. 2. Demonstrate knowledge, comprehension and application of central themes and concepts related to Meanings of Madness, including relevant historical developments, theories, ethical standards, research findings, and the complexity of mental health processes (assessed using weekly written reflective assignments, presentations); 3. Evaluate and apply research methods in mental health, as demonstrated by the ability to summarize, interpret and critically evaluate the research in this area in written and class presentation formats (assessed using article critique, presentation of primary research, annotated bibliography project); 4. Demonstrate the following proficiencies: 1. select relevant, current research on a topic; 2. understand and interpret research; 3. organize and synthesize information from multiple sources; 4. master APA writing style and format (assessed using literature review project on a topic of your choice, related to mental health outcomes); 5. Apply your knowledge to your own mental health processes (for example, categories of problems, evaluation, client/patient care, treatment methods and strategies, treatment outcomes) through weekly reflective assignments, class discussions and to professional applications such as education, communication disorders, law, clinical psychology/mental health, and social relationships. Requirements Satisfied: Social Sciences and Writing and Information Literacy
Requirements Satisfied: Social Sciences and Writing and Information Literacy
 

PSYS 095 B&D —Debunking Myths of Adolescence
Instructor: Jamie Abaied

In American culture, adolescents (also known as teenagers) are often viewed in a negative light. But are these views accurate? For example, do adolescents constantly argue with their parents? Are all adolescents really as lazy, hormonal, and obsessed with sex as we think they are? Are adolescents permanently glued to their smartphones? Through the lens of developmental psychology, this writing intensive course will explore common stereotypes about American adolescents and examine whether or not these stereotypes are confirmed by research findings. Through this process, we will seek to separate fact from fiction and better understand the true nature of this unique developmental period.
Requirements Satisfied: Social Sciences and Writing and Information Literacy
 

PSYS 095 E —Scientific Study of Human Sexuality
Instructor: Allesandra Rellini

Our society sends us constant messages about sex and defines what we should like, do, and not do. Have you ever wondered how much of what you learn from the media is actually true? Are men and women really that different from each other when it comes to sexual desire, arousal, and orgasm? How do our minds and bodies respond to sexual stimuli and what makes us want to have sexual relations? Through this writing-intensive course, students will learn to critically read scientific articles and write research papers exploring the world of sex research. Our interdisciplinary approach to the study of sex will incorporate knowledge coming from the fields of psychology, biology, pharmacology, anthropology, and psychiatry. If you take this class, you will need to be open-minded and ready to face the fact that sex is not as simple as you may have thought, and you cannot base your knowledge on what your friends or the media tell you.
Requirements Satisfied: Social Sciences and Writing and Information Literacy
 

PSYS 095 F —On Becoming a Friend
Instructor: Lisa Cepeda

This interactive course will explore friendships and the significant role they play in our lives. We will explore the challenges of friendships and learn what is involved in building intimate connections. Anger, conflict and dealing with communication blocks are a part of all relationships. Looking at the barriers to effective communication, (our anxieties) will preface our skills work in learning an assertive response style. Using real life challenges from dorm room awkwardness to cell-phone rudeness will form the core of the skills component. We will look at the insecurities that surface in relationships and the anxieties that manifest in poor behaviors (passive-aggressiveness). The challenge of forming intimate relationships is the major task of early adulthood. We will take it on in this dynamic skills- based class.
Requirements Satisfied: Social Sciences and Writing and Information Literacy
 

 

Sociology

SOC 019 C —Race Relations in the USA
Instructor: Nikki Khanna Sherwin

The main purpose of this course is to introduce students to the sociological analysis of race and ethnic relations. We will examine patterns of ethnic/racial relations and apply these patterns to ethnic/racial groups within the United States. Once we have investigated race relations in the U.S., we will then turn to examining cases outside the U.S. as a basis for comparison. The basic outline of the course is: I. Perspectives on Race and Ethnic Relations II. Major Race and Ethnic Groups in the United States Today III. Comparative Perspectives: South Africa and Brazil
Requirements Satisfied: Social Sciences, Writing and Information Literacy, and (D1) Race Relations and Ethnicity in the U.S.
 

SOC 054 A —Health Care in America
Instructor: Dale Jaffe

Who cares about health care in America? Apparently millions of people do, given the role this issue played in the 2008, 2012, and 2016 presidential campaigns, the attention paid to the 2013 Supreme Court decision on President Obama's Affordable Care Act, and the recent failed attempt of the new Congress to repeal the law completely.  Why does health care inspire such debate? Doesn't the U.S. have the best health care system ever constructed by humankind? With the current health care reform debate as a point of departure, this course will provide an introduction to the social, political, historical, and economic perspectives necessary to understand the workings of one of America's most interesting and contested social institutions. Designed for students who have an intellectual or professional interest in health care or medicine or who are considering pursuing majors in the social sciences, the course will explore the following questions: Who or what is responsible for health and illness? Why do disparities in health and medical care exist between groups? How is health care organized and financed in the U.S.? How should health care be distributed in our society? Why has health policy taken the form it has? What can the U.S. learn from studying health care delivery systems in other nations? In addition, students will be encouraged to examine their own roles as engaged citizens in shaping the reform of health care in America.
Requirements Satisfied: Social Sciences, and Writing and Information Literacy
 

 

 

Natural Sciences and Mathematics

Biology

BIOL 095 A —BioFabLab: Making Science
Instructor: Andrew Mead

Biologist and Nobel laureate Sydney Brenner said “progress in science depends on new techniques, new observations, and new ideas… probably in that order.” What does that mean? It sounds sort of upside down, but he might just be right. Being creative, and inventing new tools for interrogating the living world is a big part being a biologist. In BioFabLab, you and your team will be given a real research question coming from one of the labs at UVM. Over the course of the semester your job will be to design, prototype, build, and describe a completely new piece of research equipment to answer that question. Part of the class will be held on campus, exploring the biological concepts at question behind the research. The rest of the time you will be getting your hands dirty, creating, and learning new skills such as 3D printing, laser cutting, and Arduino® programming at Burlington’s state of the art makerspace, Burlington Generator. Extensive background in biology is not necessary to be successful in this course; a foundation in basic high school biology is sufficient.
Requirements Satisfied: One Non-laboratory Natural Sciences, Writing and Information Literacy, and Sustainability
 

 

Chemistry

CHEM 071 A —Environmental Risk
Instructor: Alexander Wurthmann

Our environment is a complex web of human development and natural beauty. How we interact with our technologies, food and each other may lead to chemical risks. However, gathering and understanding information related to the severity of risks due to natural or synthetic chemicals is complicated. Is it true that the chemicals in our soil, water, and air are making us sick, allergic, or prone to cancer? This chemistry class will begin with an introduction to basic chemical principles and these skills will then used to examine situations that are blatantly problematic. Other chemicals/reactions that are more ambiguous will provide the opportunity for healthy debates and discussions. The evolving knowledge will allow us look beyond the qualitative “chemicals are bad for you”, and use quantifiable methods (epidemiology, pharmacokinetics, EPA and FDA guidelines) to assess the value information from a variety of sources and maybe dismiss others.
Requirements Satisfied: One Non-laboratory Natural Sciences, Writing and Information Literacy, and Sustainability
 

 

Geology

GEOL 011 A —Dynamic Earth through Google™ Earth
Instructor: John Hughes

The Earth is a dynamic planet, and scientists have learned much about the Earth by “stepping back” and viewing it from afar, from space. Such a view is now afforded to laypersons, through the use of Google™ Earth. This course will provide a description of the dynamic processes that have shaped our planet, and, where appropriate, view the results of those processes from space using Google™ Earth. This will allow us to gain a perspective of the Earth that we have only recently obtained, and also to view the results of 4.6 billion years of dynamic processes on Earth. As learning partners, Professor Hughes and student colleagues will explore planet Earth as geologists, unraveling the history of the Earth by understanding the processes that have shaped it as it is today.
Requirements Satisfied: One Non-laboratory Natural Sciences and Writing and Information Literacy
 

 

GEOL 095 C —The Blue Planet: Introduction to Physical Oceanography
Instructor: Charlotte Mehrtens

When viewed from space, the most notable feature of the earth is the huge expanse of its surface that is covered by the oceans. Oceanography is the science of this part of our earth system.  The subject is too huge to cover in one course, so “The Blue Planet” will focus on the origin of the ocean basins and the behavior of the water (tides, currents and waves).  We will also explore how the oceans influence, and are influenced by, global climate. You will have the opportunity to explore marine life or other topics of interest to you in a term paper.
Requirements Satisfied: One Natural Science with a Lab and Writing and Information Literacy