We are committed to providing individualized and multiculturally competent services and resources to all UVM students and alums.

Do you need help navigating the way your identity might show up in the job search? You'll find resources below about networking, mentorship, and assessing prospective employers below, and identity-specific resources linked on the sidebar.

Finding a Mentor

Mentors can help you grow personally and professionally while sharing experiences, giving advice and providing support. Mentors do not necessarily have to hold the same identities as you do, but they should be someone you feel comfortable with and who is supportive of you.

There are many different types of mentors and it can be a formal or informal relationship. In choosing a mentor, figure out what you need first and then explore the possibilities to see who fits best.

Developing Your Network

A network of working professionals and alums can give you a leg up in the job, internship, or grad school search. Networking is a key aspect of the search process, and it is never too early to get started.

Tips For Success

  • Utilize tools like UVM Connect and LinkedIn to connect with UVM alums
  • Ask club advisors, professors, and supervisors if they have any contacts in your industry or area of interest
  • Clarify your purpose for networking. For example, are you still exploring your interests? Looking to land a specific job or internship? Or, are you hoping to learn more about working in a particular field through job shadowing or an informational interview?

Learn More About Networking

Assessing an Organization's Committment to Diversity

While it may be difficult to accurately determine how inclusive an employer really is, there are some key indicators to look for that will help you understand their values, their compliance with Equal Employment Opportunity laws, and the overall climate of an organization.

Organizational Values

When reviewing a company's website or recruitment materials, look for some of the following:

  • A statement of their commitment to diversity and non-discrimination policies
  • In-house employee support, mentorship, or social networks for people from marginalized backgrounds (i.e. employees of color, LGBTQ employess, veteran employees, etc.)
  • Diversity rankings from industry organizations
  • Recruitment efforts in diversity-oriented publications, networks, and events
  • Membership in professional organizations for people from marginalized backgrounds
  • Diversity amongst the senior management and Board of Directors

Equal Employment Opportunity Compliance

In the United States, all employers are required to comply with Equal Employment Opportunity laws, which means that they cannot discriminate against applicants or employess based on their race, religion, sex, national origin, age, or disability. To find out if an organization has violated EEO laws, you can:

  • Search for the employer's name along with an identifying term such as "civil rights violation" or "lawsuit"
  • Check on the U.S. Equal Employment Opportunity Commission's website for lawsuits related to the employer

Sometimes, charges of discrimination can lead to an employer introducing new policies and attempting to change the culture of their organization. So, if an employer does have a civil rights violation, check to see if they have made public statements about changes to their organization's inclusion efforts and be sure to speak with current employees about their experiences during your interview.

Assessing Climate

  • What is it like to work here?
  • Could you describe the organization's culture?
  • Could you give me an example of the organization's commitment to diversity?
  • Talk to your friends and family about the employer — have they heard anything positive or negative about it?