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Featured stories in the media

'The Silent History' Turns Up the Noise on a New Kind of E-Book

Los Angeles Times LogoThe Los Angeles Times interviews assistant professor of English Kevin Moffett about his new collaborative work, The Silent History, a serialized novel app for iPhone and iPad "with visuals and text that set up the story of a present-and-future dystopia in which a mysterious epidemic of speechlessness has broken out among a generation of children." According to one production consultant for digital content strategies, the project is "artistically exceptional" and a "technological innovation." The Silent History was also featured in The New York Times, The Boston Globe, USA Today, Wired magazine and Publishers Weekly. Read the story at LATimes.com...

'New' Vermont is Liberal, but 'Old' Vermont is Still There

New Yok Times LogoThe New York Times, investigating Vermont in Nate Silver's "FiveThirtyEight" blog, relies on the expertise of political scientist Garrison Nelson to explain the state's complex political landscape. Vermont has a record of voting for President Obama yet retains conservative state officials, he explains, because, though hundreds of thousands of new Vermonters changed the state politically in the 60s and 70s, longtime natives are fiscally conservative while having "little affection for national Republicans." Read the post at NYTimes.com...

Shifting Gears

Inside Higher Ed logo"No one is really talking about the culture of the bicycle and the cultural impacts of bicycles on people's lives," environmental anthropologist and director of the Global and Regional Studies Program Luis Vivanco tells Inside Higher Ed. But Vivanco is -- doing field research and developing courses on the social science of bicycles -- in hopes that the policy conversation will shift, "so it isn’t always, how do we address cars. It's more, how do we adjust transportation so we can address all these big social problems that we have." Read the story at InsideHigherEd.com...

Ten Most Inventive States

CNNMoney logoWith strong credit to University of Vermont research, CNNMoney, the online presence of Fortune and Money magazines, names Vermont number one in their top ten list of most inventive states, a list based on patent activity. Among UVM's technology research credited with driving the state, the article notes the development of wood coatings based on whey protein, a renewable resource, to produce a full line of environmentally safe floor and furniture finishes, as well as contributions to developing genetic testing for the MSH2 gene, a test which can help with the early detection of colorectal cancer. Read the story at Money.CNN.com...

New Research Reveals the Latest Secret to Happiness and Low Mood -- How You Use Twitter

The Huffington Post logoPositive moods appear to be correlated with those in your Twitter social network - up to three links away, according to a new study published in the Journal of Computational Science by graduate student Catherine Bliss, professors Christopher Danforth and Peter Dodds and their research team in the Department of Mathematics and Statistics. Researchers used a "hedomenter" for scoring the happiness level of words used in a tweet, measured on a scale of one to nine, with "love" rating 8.42 and "die" coming in at 1.74. "The study," according to the UK Huffington Post, "computed the happiness of each user by applying this 'hedometer' to all tweets authored by the user." Using this measure, contentment levels are higher the closer a user is to those who are very happy and declines with the degree of separation. Read the story at HuffingtonPost.co.uk.com...

Trees May Help Police Urban Neighborhoods

Boston Globe LogoThe Boston Globe's Green Blog writes about a study co-authored by Austin Troy, associate professor in the Rubenstein School, finding a very strong association between neighborhoods with more trees and lower crime rates. The study was also written about extensively in Yale University's Environment, which includes an alumni profile of Troy, who earned his bachelor's and master's degrees from Yale. Read the stories at Boston.com... and Environment.Yale.edu...

Should the FDA Rethink How It Runs Clinical Trials?

NPR LogoComplex systems expert Stuart Kauffman, an experimental and theoretical biologist, frequently posts on National Public Radio's blog, "13.7: Cosmos and Culture." In this recent piece Kauffman argues that random clinical trials with a single variable are unable to draw conclusions about processes with multiple, independent factors. Read the post at NPR.org... Kauffman also contributed "Random Clinical Trials Are Not the Only Answer to Identifying Effective Therapies."

More select print stories

Maritime Malt and Eggy Whiffs: What Exactly Does Beer Terroir Mean?

The Globe and Mail taps the expertise of anthropology professor Amy Trubek to define the concept of terroir in an article on microbrewed beer. Trubek says terroir restores a critical link between how we "pick and choose what to eat," and "our relationship to the natural world." Trubek is the author of A Taste of Place: A Cultural Journey into Terroir. Read the story at TheGlobeandMail.com...

Yogurt Linked to Lower BP

As well as other contributions to Medpage Today's series on hypertension, Rachel Johnson, professor of nutrition and spokesperson for the American Heart Association, offered advice in their print and audio stories about the benefits of consuming low fat dairy products as part of a diet to lower blood pressure. Read the story and listen to the audio at MedPageToday...

Is Sugar Really That Bad For You?

In this story on CNN.com and Health.com, nutrition professor Rachel Johnson is asked if sugar is bad for you or just the latest, trendy food-villain. While consuming too much added sugar can lead to serious health problems, Johnson notes that "there’s no need to avoid the naturally-occurring sugars in fruit, vegetables, and low and nonfat dairy." Read the story at CNN.com...

With US or Against US

In this opinion column in Gulf News, political scientist Gordon Robison writes that it would be in the best interest of Egyptian President Mursi and President Obama to work together in coming years. "In moving forward..." he argues, "Americans are going to have to work on being less bossy -- and the Egyptians on being less prickly." Read the story at GulfNews.com...

New UVM President Outlines His 'Big Dreams' for School at Installation Ceremony

The Burlington Free Press reports that, among the pageantry accompanying the installation ceremony of President E. Thomas Sullivan, including remarks by former Vice President Walter Mondale, his speech outlined four specific, tangible pathways to achieving his vision for the university. Read stories at BurlingtonFreePress.com... and also at VermontBiz.com...

Walter Mondale: Divided We Fall

The Burlington Free Press interviews former Vice President Walter Mondale, a close friend of President Sullivan's, in Burlington to speak at the presidential installation ceremony. Contact University Communications for information.

Puzzling Over Blue-green Algae

The Burlington Free Press features interdisciplinary research between Mary Watzin, dean of the Rubenstein School and Donna Rizzo, associate professor of engineering. Watzin used Rizzo's artificial neural networks computer program to identify patterns in her decade of blue-green algae data. When the computer linked the supposedly surface-dwelling algae to elements released from the sediment floor of the lake, Watzin began to suspect that, "the algae are going down to the bottom at night, scarfing up that nitrogen and phosphorous, and going back to the surface." Read the story at BurlingtonFreePress.com...

Head Shrink

In an interview with Seven Days, new dean of the College of Arts and Sciences Antonio Cepeda-Benito, a respected professor of psychology with a long tenure of administrative experience at Texas A&M University, says he's excited to be on a campus that's equally committed to intensive research and teaching. He says his psychological training is useful as dean in problem solving, getting people to work together and selling ideas. Ultimately, Cepeda-Benito says, his main goal is to give "students the best education they can to serve them for the rest of their lives." Read the story at SevenDaysVT.com...

Side-Stepping Supply Side: Why Aren't We Discussing 'Nega-Miles?'

In a Burlington Free Press Q & A with Professor Richard Watts of the Transportation Research Center discussing the political rhetoric surrounding energy independence, Watts says, "We’re not going to solve this problem by increasing supply... the cheapest and cleanest mile of travel is going to be the mile that's not travelled in an automobile," a concept for which Watts coined the term "nega-mile." Read the story at BurlingtonFreePress.com...

Real Food, Real Foodies

The Burlington Free Press features the details of making UVM's commitment to the Real Food Challenge work, having agreed to 20 percent "real" food expenditures in dining halls, cafeterias and campus bistros by 2020. To qualify food must have at least one of the following attributes: be local or community based, produced in a sustainable manner, be considered fair-trade and, in the case of animals, have been treated humanely. Read the story at BurlingtonFreePress.com...

A Musical Response to Irene and Its Aftermath

In an essay for the Burlington Free Press, composer and associate professor of music David Feurzeig describes "Highwater," a piece commissioned by the Vermont Symphony Orchestra for their "Made in Vermont" tour, as a "musical remembrance" in response to Tropical Storm Irene. He writes that the three sections: "Rain," "Silt" and "Grit" flow from Irene's "inexorable rise…shock and paralysis…to the resolve and neighborly hard work that followed the devastation." Read the story at BurlingtonFreePress.com...

South Burlington Filmmaker in India

As an undergraduate on a trip to India, Nilima Abrams '06 tells the Burlington Free Press she was so affected by meeting a multiethnic family -- an American father and Filipino mother who adopted 35 Indian orphans -- that she left her camcorder with them. Now, a UVM adjunct professor and Fulbright scholar, she's returned to film a documentary using both new footage and that taken by the family, with the intent of sharing the kids' stories of transformation in hopes of challenging viewers' assumptions about who street children are. Read the story at BurlingtonFreePress.com...

Debussy Concert at UVM Explores an Artistic Revolution

Seven Days reviews the series of collaborative concerts by Tom Simone, professor of English, and Paul Orgel, music faculty pianist, calling it one of the "gems of Burlington's classical music scene." The Music and Literature Concert Series has included such events as an evening of Shostakovich and Messiaen to gain insight into World War Two-era writing and pieces by Prokofiev and Martinu to invite listeners into Paris of the 1920s. Now the students taking Simone's "Dawn of Modernism" class will experience Orgel's "Composer of the Modern: Debussy at 150." Read the story at SevenDaysVT.com...

Growing Season

Eighteen students from all walks of life -- recent college graduates from around the country, Wall Street financiers and small-scale vegetable farmers -- are spending six months in the Farm Training Program at UVM's horticulture center, according to this Burlington Free Press interview with Laura Williams, farm coordinator, and several of her students, who discuss cultivating more than three acres, visiting local farms, producing saleable crops and marketing these crops in this experiential continuing education program. Read the story at BurlingtonFreePress.com...

Hip to Local Hops

The Burlington Free Press interviews agronomist Heather Darby about the new interest by both growers and brewers to produce local hops for making Vermont beer. Darby has found some strains of hops that thrive in Vermont yet are very labor intensive to harvest. To solve the problem, she explains, UVM Extension bought a mobile hop harvester, "a shared piece of infrastructure" to loan to local farms. Contact University Communications for information.

New Arts Entrepreneurs in Burlington Promote Sustainable Culture

Felix Wai, doctoral student at the Rubenstein School and his partner, sat down with Seven Days to talk about their company, ArtsRiot. Funded by grants and less than a year old, ArtsRiot has hosted events from graffiti to skateboarding, supports local artists and keeps a blog with an extensive calendar of art events at artsriot.com. Read the story at SevenDaysVT.com...

UVM Upgraded in Lake-Research Status

The Burlington Free Press reports that the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration's Sea Grant College program has elevated UVM and SUNY's joint Lake Champlain research from "project" status to "Coherent Area Program." Mary Watzin, director of the program and dean of the Rubenstein School of Environment and Natural Resources said, "It's very gratifying that Sea Grant not only values this work but would like to see it expand." Contact University Communications for information.

Government Employment Higher in Vermont Than Elsewhere

In this "How We're Doing" piece for the Burlington Free Press, associate professor of economics Arthur Woolf writes that, according to the Census Bureau, not only does Vermont have the sixth highest number of government jobs per capita, but the number of government employees in Vermont has grown faster than any other state in the country. Read the story at BurlingtonFreePress.com...Woolf also contributed "Electricity Prices in VT Among Nation’s Highest," "Where Have All the Babies Gone?" "The Ebbs and Flows of Vermont Voter Turnout” and "The Uninsured in Vermont."

Theater Review: Intense lessons in 'How I Learned to Drive'

The Burlington Free Press laudes seniors Natalie Battistone and Colby Morgan for tackling complex roles and themes -- adolescence, incest and pedophilia -- in How I Learned to Drive. “Those complexities could be too challenging for young actors," the paper says, "but the UVM cast embraces the challenge." Read the story at BurlingtonFreePress.com...

New Methods of Monitoring and Controlling Cyanobacteria Blooms in Lake Champlain

After a team of researchers from the Rubenstein School of Environment and Natural Resources published their work in the Journal of Great Lakes -- a new method to map cyanobacteria blooms with satellite data -- The Examiner writes that, in the wake of the Champlain blue-green algae blooms caused by hurricane weather runoff, theirs may be among the important new methods of preserving the health of the lake. Read the story at Examiner.com...

UVM Launches Start-up Help for Student Entrepreneurs

The Burlington Free Press announces the launch of UVM Start, a website which features a handful of exceptional student projects each semester, to allow interested alumni to pick projects to fund or mentor. President Sullivan says, "UVM Start is just the kind of technology-savvy program we need in higher education." Read the story at BurlingtonFreePress.com...

How to Raise Young Farmers in Vermont

In order to ensure the success of the next generation of Vermont farmers, writes extension coordinator Ali Zipparo in the Burlington Free Press, UVM has launched a program to cultivate their business skills and, with the help of investors, set them up with individual development accounts, matching their own savings 2-to-1. Read the story at BurlingtonFreePress.com...

UVM Alumni Couple Donates $1 million for Honors College

Carolyn Brennan '82 and Robert Brennan '83, a member of the board of directors of the UVM Foundation and the UVM board, have pledged $1 million to the Honors College, the Burlington Free Press notes. Half of the money will go to the already substantial Brennan Family Scholarship Fund that has been benefiting five Honors College students every year since 2006. The other half of their donation will establish the Brennan Summer Research Fellowship which will increase such research funding by 50 percent. Contact University Communications for information.

Wild Thing

Seven Days congratulates the Fleming Museum for landing a sought-after exhibit of watercolors by Thornton Dial Sr. The curator of the exhibit, Bernie Herman, says that, though the African American from Alabama has no formal artistic training, he is, "one of the most remarkable living artists." Dial worked for nearly forty years with little recognition, but after a review in the late 80s his art has exploded in popularity, with some of his sculptures now selling for six figures. Read the story at SevenDaysVT.com...

A Special Memorial Walk For A UVM Student

The Burlington Free Press hiked a Danby section of The Long Trail with UVM's DREAM mentors and youth mentees. The hike was one of 40 completed in a weekend by 400 UVM students completing the Long Trail for the Catamount Classic event, a memorial for the late Avi Kurganoff. Kurganoff was a UVM student and member of the outing club. Kurganoff dreamed of a program to introduce youths to the outdoors. Contact University Communications for information.

Creative Corner: Is Vermont Politically Risky as an Emerging Market?

Allison Kingsley, associate professor in the School of Business Administration, writes an opinion piece for the Burlington Free Press concerning the environment for doing business in Vermont. Read the story at BurlingtonFreePress.com...

Reidel Scholarship Created at UVM

In memory of Professor Carl Reidel, founder of the Environmental Studies Program, the Burlington Free Press reports a new scholarship fund established to focus on experiential learning for students in the Honors College. "The Environmental Studies Program," according to Reidel's wife, Professor Emeritus Jean Richardson, "was envisaged by Carl as a university-wide, interdisciplinary and multi-disciplinary Honors Program." Contact University Communications for information.

UVM Tests Aerial Planting of Cover Crops

Heather Darby speaks to VtDigger about UVM Extension's pilot program to help farmers by planting cover crops in Vermont cornfields by helicopter. Though the first year saw some technical difficulties, Darby says they learned a lot and she is optimistic about moving the program forward. Read the story at VTDigger.com...