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Featured stories in the media

Alien Entrees

New Yorker LogoConservation biologist Joe Roman was featured in the New Yorker's "Talk of the Town" for his unorthodox method of controlling invasive species: he cooks and consumes them -- with style. Green crabs, introduced from Europe and now voracious and prolific, often out-competing native North American shore dwellers, Roman suggests enjoying soft-shelled in spring, sauté in butter, garnishing with parley and serving with French bread. Roman has also teamed with a New Haven sushi chef to turn pesky burdock into a comestible glazed with soy sauce and honey, "to give locals a taste of their own backyards." Read the story at NewYorker.com (subscription required)... or contact University Communications.

Long Walks, Deep Thoughts

The Chronicle LogoIn his essay for The Chronicle of Higher Education, Robert Manning, professor in the Rubenstein School of Natural Resources, explores the "biomechanical marvel" of bipedalism along with the powerful historical connection between walking and philosophy, scholarship, literature, human rights protests and spirituality, from Aristotle to Martin Luther King. Of John Muir, Manning says, "His walks offered him deep insights into our relationship with the natural world, writing, "'I only went out for a walk, and finally concluded to stay out until sundown, for, going out, I found, was really going in.'" The piece is excerpted from his book, Walking Distance: Extraordinary Hikes for Ordinary People. Read the story at Chronicle.com (subscription required)... or contact University Communications.

Can America Embrace Biking the Way Denmark Has?

Slate logoProfessor Austin Troy, head of the Transportation Research Center, visits Copenhagen, reporting for Slate on the infrastructure for bicyclists there. Troy writes that the city's dedication to cyclists -- building racks, lanes and timing traffic lights so bicycles never hit a green and can navigate intersections with ease -- has lead to 58 percent of Copenhageners getting on their bikes daily, a trend that saves energy and money. While only 0.4 percent of commuters currently bike in the United States, Troy believes we could catch up with a similar commitment to the needs of cyclists. Read the story at Slate.com...

The Energy Costs of Oil Production

The World LogoEric Zencey, a fellow with the Gund Institute for Ecological Economics, interviewed on Public Radio International's "The World," explains that renewable energy sources are yielding a higher rate of return than oil, asserting that, "the age of oil should be over." Zencey also talks to "The World" about reconsidering traditional measures of GDP, advocating "gross domestic transactions," to factor in additional barometers of productivity and of national happiness. Listen to the interview at The World.org here... and here...

Model Sheds Light on Chemistry That Sparked Origin of Life

Science Daily logoScience Daily and numerous other publications feature a study by experimental and theoretical biologist Stuart Kauffman and colleagues published in the journal Acta Biotheoretica that could help answer a longstanding scientific quandary: how life began on a molecular level. "By combining, splitting, and recombining to form new types of networks of their own subunits," the story explains, "the (team's molecular) models indicate that these subsets of molecules could give rise to increasingly large and complex networks of chemical reactions, and, presumably, life." Read the story at ScienceDaily.com...

A View From Doha: The Time to Tackle Climate Change Is Now

NPR LogoPosting from Doha, Qatar, at the United Nations-driven Conference of Parties (COP 18), Asim Zia, assistant professor in the Department of Community Development and Applied Economics, (with complex systems expert and co-author Stuart Kauffman), urges immediate and transformative economic shifts to avoid a widespread climate crisis. Read the post at NPR.org... Kauffman also contributed "Let's Look Beyond Random Trials When Assessing New Drug."

Two Wars Against Cancer

The New York Times logoKathryn E. Giusti '80 talks to The New York Times about her personal fight against cancer -- and her professional one, co-founding with her identical twin sister (also a UVM alumna) and becoming CEO of the Multiple Myeloma Research Foundation in Norwalk, Conn. Read the story at NYTimes.com...

University of Vermont Joins Move to End Bottled Water Sales

Reuters logoReuters, in a story that appeared widely, features UVM as the largest university to lead the trend of banning the sale of bottled water for ecological and economic reasons. Read the story at Reuters.com... and watch the Burlington Free Press video on the building of the eco-sculpture celebrating the move.

New Saudi Interior Minister Moves Up Succession Ladder

The World logoPolitical scientist Gregory Gause, an authority on the Middle East, talks to Public Radio International's "The World" about King Abdullah's sudden appointment of Prince Mohammed bin Nayef as interior minister, considered an unusual maneuver in "the complex political chess game" the Saudi royal family appears to be engaged in. Listen to the interview at The World.org...

More select print stories

Can Obama Dodge the Second-Term Trap?

The National Journal interviews political scientist John P. Burke, a scholar of presidential transitions and author of the study "Planning a Second Term: Challenges Continue." Burke warns that a president must choose second-term advisors carefully, "because we've seen a lot of second-term presidencies unravel because of various scandals." Read the story at NationalJournal.com...

Multiple Sclerosis Linked to Vitamin D Levels

In a Wall Street Journal interview, Andrew Solomon, M.D., professor of neurology and MS specialist, says "there's mounting evidence" that low vitamin D levels influence the disease. The article covers a recent Swedish study published in the journal Neurology -- Solomon already tells his patients suffering from MS to take 2,000 to 4,000 international units of vitamin D each day. Read the story at WSJ.com...

Climate Change Threat Looms Over Ski Industry

David Kaufman of the Rubenstein School of Environment and Natural Resources talks to The Boston Globe about the potential evolution of ski resorts as the potential for erratic weather appears to grow. Read the story at Boston.com...

Happiness, GDP, and the Presidential Race

An opinion piece for ABCNews.com on a global movement proposing that emotional well-being is as significant to measure as GDP (evidenced by a groundbreaking high-level meeting at the UN last April), notes that Vermont is one of the first U.S. states to embrace the idea, charging UVM's Gund Institute for Ecological Economics with developing recommendations. Read the story at ABCNews.go.com...

Breaking: Six in Ten Men Will Get This

In a story on heart disease risk, Prevention references a study by medical professor Ira Bernstein, M.D. and his research team, recently published in the Journal of Preventive Medicine, showing that financial incentives can help with smoking cessation. Read the story at Prevention.com...

Digestion System: The Nine Biggest Myths of Digestion, Debunked

The Huffington Post picks up this story in which Peter Moses, M.D., professor of gastroenterology and hepatology, dispels common digestive myths. Read the story at HuffingtonPost.com...

Conspiracy Theories Won’t Lead to Truth

Among other editorials for GulfNews.com, political scientist Gordon Robison argues conspiracy theories linking the Libya consulate's death with Petraeus' affair are publicized because of counterproductive political motivations to criticize the current administration for the Benghazi assassination. Read the story at GulfNews.com...

Asperger's Dropped from Revised Diagnosis Manual

Professor of psychiatry David Fassler, M.D. comments for this widely distributed Associated Press story about the decision to classify Asperger's under the umbrella of "autism spectrum disorders" in the new psychiatric diagnostic manual. Read the story at News.Yahoo.com...

Obesity Research Gets Weightier

Science News in a story that looks into the complexities of why people become obese, talks to biochemist Russell Tracy who references atherosclerosis, metabolic problems and other chronic diseases as potential problems created by obesity. Read the story at ScienceNews.org...

Your Body on a Long Flight

Mary Cushman, M.D., director of the Thrombosis and Hemostasis Program, contributed to this Woman's Health story on the physical effects of flying. Read the story at WomensHealthMag.com...

Sullivan Wants Tuition Hike of Less Than Three Percent

In its coverage of President Sullivan's first address to the Board of Trustees, the Burlington Free Press notes his stated priorities: to cultivate a selective research university with a high ratio of professors on a track to tenure and students on track to graduate. Citing affordability as an imperative, he urged that the board keep tuition hikes to the lowest level in sixteen years. Read the story at BurlingtonFreePress.com...

Bramley to Oversee Changes Suggested by UVM Advisory Panel

According to the Burlington Free Press, former interim president John Bramley will serve as an advisor to the president on the implementation of Gov. Shumlin's advisory committee's suggestions for maximizing the state's investment in higher education, focusing on making UVM accessible to Vermonters; investment in research; and training graduates for the fields of science, technology, engineering and mathematics. Read the story at BurlingtonFreePress.com...

A Seat for Students: Ludlow Chairmaker Supplies UVM

The Rutland Herald applauds Vice President Richard Cate's decision to meet UVM's furniture needs locally. The Herald profiles Brent Karner, owner of Clear Lake Furniture of Ludlow, who won the contract, engineered and built 150 "Waterman Stackers" in three months. Karner was able to source the cherry lumber locally, keep his employees working during the recession and win an award for the innovative chair design. Read the story at RutlandHerald.com...

Creative Corner: The Trick to Getting Started

The Burlington Free Press features UVM Start, a student entrepreneurship program that helps students starting businesses find mentors and raise funds through the university's vast alumni base. The program, according to the story, partnering with the UVM Foundation and John Evans, M.D., former dean of the College of Medicine and member of the Vermont Technology Council, ties UVM into the local economy by catalyzing the "entrepreneurial ecosystem of Vermont." Read the story at BurlingtonFreePress.com...

Student Entrepreneurship Takes Off Like a Flying Robot

Inspired by a day of skiing he wishes he could have captured on video, senior engineering student Julian Tryba chose a team and wrote a grant to design and build a device combining a remote control hexicopter with a video camera programmed to follow a user's smartphone. According to the Burlington Free Press, the team was awarded $2,000 by UVM's Senior Experience in Engineering Design to launch the project. Branding the business Eleview, the design is one of the seven inaugural projects seeking funds and advice from alumni through the UVM Start "crowd-based donating platform" mentioned above. Read the story at BurlingtonFreePress.com...

Side-Stepping Supply Side: Why Aren't We Discussing 'Nega-Miles?'

In a Burlington Free Press Q & A with Professor Richard Watts of the Transportation Research Center discussing the political rhetoric surrounding energy independence, Watts says, "We’re not going to solve this problem by increasing supply... the cheapest and cleanest mile of travel is going to be the mile that's not travelled in an automobile," a concept for which Watts coined the term "nega-mile." Read the story at BurlingtonFreePress.com...

Cynic Wins another Pacemaker Award

The Burlington Free Press reports that UVM's student newspaper has won a Pacemaker Award, considered the Pulitzer Prize of campus journalism, for the second year in a row, this time for its online version, validating a decision to focus on improving the paper's online presence. Contact University Communications.

From the Animals' View

If there's a celebrity in the field of animal science it's Temple Grandin who, as the Burlington Free Press reports, drew a "near-capacity" crowd to Ira Allen Chapel to hear her talk about how animals perceive the world and how their handlers can engage them with humanity. Known for working with major corporations to design better systems to reduce animals' stress before slaughter, Grandin said "an animal is a sensory-based thinker," as she listed specific, practical advice on the sensitive care of livestock. Read the story at BurlingtonFreePress.com...

Theater Review: Out of the Past, 'Arabian Nights' Provides Stories for Our Times

The Burlington Free Press calls UVM's interpretation of The Arabian Nights "a beautiful, exotic production," with gorgeous sets by Jeff Modereger and mesmerizing choreography led by sophomore Emily Evans. Admitting that filling every role in 1,001 nights of stories with an ensemble of 15 actors is ambitious, the cast, says the Free Press, expertly navigates multiple roles and "keeps The Arabian Nights flowing smoothly." Read the story at BurlingtonFreePress.com...

At Youth Summit, Rays of (Renewable) Sunshine

The Burlington Free Press features the Youth Environmental Summit organized by UVM's Extension 4-H program, with the aim of empowering young people to learn about and get involved in environmental issues at the community level. Contact University Communications.

Basement Treasure Gives Insight Into History of Ruggles House

According to the Burlington Free Press, Bailey Howe Special Collections accepts -- and pledges to restore -- a donation of 5,000 papers found in the boiler room of the Ruggles House, including ledger books, correspondence and loose papers extending back more than 100 years and telling the saga of the mansion built in 1820. After various owners (some with a UVM connection), the most compelling papers reveal the story of Lucy Ruggles who, upon her death, dedicated her life savings to the creation of a retirement home for female teachers and her lawyer, Charles H. Darling, who fulfilled her dream when, after 50 years of investing, bought the house in her name. Read the story at BurlingtonFreePress.com...

Shop Till You Drop? Holiday Spending an Economic Indicator

In this "How We're Doing" piece for the Burlington Free Press, associate professor of economics Arthur Woolf writes that Black Friday sales indicate the amount of holiday shopping merchants can expect -- though profits are not extreme, this year is slightly up from last year. Read the story at BurlingtonFreePress.com...Woolf also contributed "The Ebb and Flows of Vermont Voter Turnout," "How do Vermonters Heat Their Homes?" and "Rising Vermont Unemployment Shouldn't Last."

The Aiken Center Is Far More Than an Ultra-Green Building

Gary Hawley, research associate faculty in the Rubenstein School of Environment and Natural Resources, in an "I Believe" piece for the Burlington Free Press, lauds the multifaceted benefits of the super-efficient restored Aiken Building, noting that for him the most exciting part of the project "has been the unending passion of our students for the project. They constantly want to use their young brain power to solve problems." Contact University Communications.

A Portrait in Black

The Burlington Free Press features the Fleming Museum's John Singer Sargent exhibit, From Mourning to Night, which highlights the daring of the portrait artist who painted women in black, preferring the allure of the sharp contrast against pale skin to the whites and pastels women of the late 1800s typically wore. Sargent's work, according to the exhibit, helps explain the role he had in American society and in fashion as black moved from the dress code of mourners and prostitutes into haute couture. Read the story at BurlingtonFreePress.com...

New Dance Collective Offers an Evening of Foot-Stomping Bluegrass and Blues

In advance of an upcoming FlynnSpace performance, The One-Stop Dance Tramp Family Band Tour, Seven Days discusses the work with choreographer and associate professor of dance Paul Besaw. The unique project features lively old-time church music played by local musicians (including Jom Hammack, associate professor of psychology) for a core group of dancers from the new collective Dance Tramp, among them UVM choreographer Clare Byrne. Read the story at SevenDaysVT.com...

Industrial Evolution

Seven Days visits Pine Street Studios, an industrial-arts studio founded by metal sculptor Lars Fisk '93. Today, fellow classmates John Marius creates custom metal art and pours iron, and Sarah Ryan creates art for guitars, along with a handful of other artists with unique projects. Read the story at SevenDaysVT.com...

Is the F-35 Harmful to Health? Burlington Board Seeks Answers

In a Seven Days blog post covering a Burlington Board of Health hearing, Mark Gorman, M.D., associate professor of neurological sciences, is quoted, noting the difficulty of correlating high decibels with the incidence of stroke. Read the story at SevenDaysVt.com...

UVM President Stresses Partnership and Economic Impacts with Business Leaders

Vermont Digger reports that President Sullivan shared his vision with the Burlington Business Association at an on-campus breakfast, stressing the benefits the university offers Vermont's economy: a medical college which brings in more grant money and provides more physicians per capita than any other in the country; 30,000 alumni who live in-state and bring in $1.7 billion annually; and more "patents and innovations per capita" than any other state. Read the story at VTDigger.com...

Measuring Political Risk in Emerging Markets (and Vermont)

Vermont Business Magazine looks at how Allison Kingsley, assistant professor in the school of business administration, used the Political Constraints Index to determine that Vermont is "as politically risky to conduct business in as many emerging markets." Kingsley describes her paper in The Academy of Management saying, "My fundamental argument is that Vermont lacks meaningful competition in its political institutions, making arbitrary policy change more likely." Read the story at VermontBiz.com...

Take a Tour of UVM's Presidential Mansion

The Burlington Free Press visits Englesby House, UVM's 98-year-old presidential home, as necessary renovations for President Sullivan's move-in near completion. Read the story and take a video tour at BurlingtonFreePress.com...

Horses Help Host Halloween Happening

With one horse and student pair dressed as gypsies, and others in costume as well, the student-run Horse Barn Cooperative hosted its annual Halloween Barn event at the Ellen A. Hardacre Equine Center at the UVM farm, to the delight of nearly 400 community members, including 100 children, reports the Burlington Free Press. Contact University Communications for information.