University of Vermont

University Communications

Latest Professional News

Release Date: 12-08-2010

Contact: University Communications Staff
Email: newserv@uvm.edu
Phone: (802) 656-2005 FAX: (802) 656-3203

Professional News highlights the accomplishments of UVM's faculty, students and staff. Items may be submitted for publication to uvmtoday@uvm.edu.

December 8, 2010

Awards and Honors

Third-year Russian major, Tiana Gray, has been awarded a Gilman Scholarship to study at St. Petersburg University during the spring 2011 semester. The Gilman Scholarship Program offers awards for undergraduate study abroad and was established by the International Academic Opportunity Act of 2000. This scholarship provides awards for U.S. undergraduate students who are receiving Federal Pell Grant funding at a two-year or four-year colleges or universities to participate in study abroad programs worldwide

Joshua Lee Parker, UVM junior, was awarded the Vermont Student Tree Steward Award for his work last year in the Ecological Citizenship and Tree Guild. Parker will be presented with the award at the State House in Montpelier by the governor on Dec. 8.

Cameron Wesson, professor of anthropology, has won Public Anthropology's Eleanor Roosevelt Global Citizenship Award. Named to honor the 20th century's "First Lady of the World," this award recognizes Wesson's exceptionally effective participation in Public Anthropology's Community Action Online Project as well his wider activities in the public sphere. Fewer than 1 percent of the faculty teaching introductory anthropology courses across North America receive this award.

Publications and Presentations

At the Family Medicine Education Consortium (FMEC) Northeast Region Meeting held in Hershey, Pa., October 29 through 31, fourth-year medical student Dung Huynh, with support from Maine Medical Center-based family medicine clinical faculty members Peggy Cyr and Julie Schirmer, received a "Best Of" Poster Award for her presentation on "Depression Screening Among Non-English Speaking Patients." Comments specifically addressed Dung’s innovation, clarity of printed poster and professional and informed presentation skills. Jason Shen, also a fourth-year medical student, received the "This I Believe Award" at the FMEC Northeast meeting. Modeled on the successful "This I Believe" project heard on National Public Radio, the FMEC program offers physicians, physicians-in-training, and medical students engaged in Family Medicine organizations the opportunity to express their core beliefs about serving others. Shen's statement was chosen from a pool of essays by physicians, residents and students and was unanimously identified as the best. He shared his statement from the podium during the meeting on Oct. 30.

December 1, 2010

Awards and Honors

Bill Eddy, who was awarded an honorary doctorate from UVM in 1993 for his 22 years of service as an adjunct professor in the environmental studies program from 1977 to 1998, was given the prestigious Williams College Bicentennial Medal for his lifetime work as an environmental educator and activist. Established in 1993 on the occasion of the college's 200th anniversary, Bicentennial Medals honor members of the Williams community for distinguished achievement in any field of endeavor.

Twenty-nine students from Professor Cameron Wesson's Human Cultures class were winners of the Public Anthropology Award, a North American competition involving more than 4,000 students from 21 schools. The students, who wrote on the topic: "Who Should be the Beneficiaries of Anthropological Research?" are: Olivia Santiago, Catherine Comiskey, Hope Simpson, Adam Paronto, Shayna Lindquist, Jonathon Weber, Alex Poniz, Erin Kelley, Ashley Neuhof, Amanda Carmellini, Megan Kier, Borivoj Golijanin, Julia Robillard, Geoff Wilson, Edmund Pfleego, Vanessa Trengrove, Elizabeth Libby, Shane Deyette, Kathleen McDonnell, George Mirageas, Anh-Thu Lam, Silas Smith, Maria Donaldson, Jose Ovalle, Cameron Mack, Sylvia Sword, Lillian Altman, Ryan Baril, and Radu Florescu.

The National Science Foundation has awarded a $489,381 continuation grant to UVM to re-fund a program called "Satellites, Weather and Climate: A professional development teacher collaborative to enhance literacy in the climate, atmospheric and geospatial sciences." The Vermont-focused program, which will run through August 2014, continues and expands the work of a UVM pilot program, which NSF funded from 2008 through this year. The co-investigators are Regina Toolin, from the College of Education and Social Services; Leslie Morrissey, from the Rubenstein School for the Environment and Natural Resources; and Bruce Berryman and Jason Shafer, of Lyndon State College. The Lyndon State connection will bring SWAC to the Northeast Kingdom.

The board of directors of the Public Library of Science (PLoS) has appointed Gary Ward, professor of microbiology and molecular genetics, as board chairman, effective January 1, 2011. Ward, a charter member of the PLoS Biology Editorial Board, has a longstanding association with PLoS and was recognized by the organization for his expertise in and support of Open Access -- a policy of providing free, public online access to scientific research literature. Ward, who joined the UVM faculty in 1996, currently serves as co-director of the Vermont Center for Immunology and Infectious Diseases at UVM. In its appointment announcement, PLoS cited Ward's Open Access credentials, which include his present role as chair of the National Library of Medicine's (NLM) PubMed Central National Advisory Committee, past membership in the NLM Public Access Working Group, and membership in the Scholarly Publishing and Academic Resources Coalition Open Access working group.

Xindong Wu, professor for the Department of Computer Science in the UVM College of Engineering and Mathematical Sciences, has been named an IEEE Fellow for his contributions to data mining and applications. The Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers (IEEE) is a non-profit professional association dedicated to advancing technical innovation. The IEEE Fellow honor is a distinction reserved for select IEEE members whose extraordinary accomplishments in any of the IEEE fields of interest are deemed fitting of this prestigious grade elevation.

November 17, 2010

Publications and Presentations

Sylvie Doublié, professor of microbiology and molecular genetics, is lead author of a Proceedings of the National Academy of Science "PNAS Early Edition" article titled "tRNAHis guanylyltransferase (THG1) a unique 3?-5? nucleotidyltransferase, shares unexpected structural homology with canonical 5?-3? DNA polymerases" and published the week of Nov. 8. Co-authors on the paper include Samantha J. Hyde, graduate student in microbiology and molecular genetics, Brian Eckenroth, lab research technician in microbiology and molecular genetics, and Nicholas Heintz, professor of pathology.

November 10, 2010

Awards and Honors

Curtis Ventriss,professor of public policy, Rubenstein School of Environment and Natural Resources and adjunct professor of policy studies, Johns Hopkins University, has been invited by President Rubens Oliveria of the Brazilian affliate of the French Ecole Nationale d' Administration to be a keynote speaker at a international policy conference to be held Nov. 16-19 in Florianopolis, Santa Catarina, Brazil. This international policy conference will include public officials and public managers in Brazil as well as scholars throughout Latin America, Europe and the United States. Professor Ventriss' keynote address is titled, "Rethinking Public Policy in A Time of Economic Crises."

November 3, 2010

Awards and Honors

Robert Manning, professor in the Rubenstein School of Environment and Natural Resources, was presented with the Theodore and Franklin Roosevelt Award for Excellence in Recreation and Park Research. The award was presented at the National Recreation and Park Association Congress in Minneapolis on October 27. The award is presented to an individual whose contributions to recreation and research have significantly advanced the cause of the recreation movement and whose dedication to the field parallels the same dedication and zeal toward parks, recreation, and conservation that was exhibited by the presidents after whom the award in named.

Mary Val Palumbo, associate professor of nursing, was selected by the Eldercare Workforce Alliance (EWA) to lobby congress on October Hill Day in Washington, DC on October 21, 2010, regarding health care workforce issues affecting the nation's elders. The Eldercare Workforce Alliance is a group of 28 national organizations, representing consumers, family caregivers, the direct-care workforce, and healthcare professionals, that joined together to address our nation's worsening eldercare crisis. The Alliance is supported by member contributions and grants from the Atlantic Philanthropies and the John A. Hartford Foundation.

Publications and Presentations

Robert V. Bartlett, Gund Professor of Liberal Arts in the Political Science Department, presented a research paper, "Democratic Deliberation and the Normative Dimensions of Environmental Change: Mapping and Developing Consensus for Governance," at the 2010 Berlin Conference on the Human Dimensions of Global Environmental Change, on October 9. The paper was co-authored by Walter F. Baber, California State University Long Beach.

Director of UVM's Center for Cultural Pluralism, Sherwood Smith and lecturer in the Integrated Professional Studies Department of the College of Education and Social services, along with Amanda Flores and Salomon Rodenzo, master's students in the Higher Education and Student Affairs program, attended and presented at the New England Conference on Multicultural Education (NECME), on October 14, in Farmington, Conn. NECME is New England's oldest and largest annual conference on multicultural education. Their presentation and workshop titled "'I Don't Have Time for the Whole Film. What Should I Do?' Teaching Social Justice Issues with Film Clips," focused on curriculum design and classroom/workshop facilitation for teachers in grades 3-12 and higher education using film. The session provided specific resources and model pedagogical practices for addressing issues of culture and social justice using film and/or video clips.

October 27, 2010

Awards and Honors

Islam and Education: Conflict and Conformity in Pakistan, written by Saleem Ali, professor of environmental studies in the Rubenstein School of Environment and Natural Resources, has been awarded an honorary mention in the Asia Society’s 2010 Bernard Schwartz Book Award. An independent jury comprised of experts in the fields of policy, media, academia, cultural affairs, and business selected awardees from a pool of more than 85 books this year. As one of four books receiving an honorable mention, Ali received an award of $2,000.

Gale Holtz Golden, clinical associate professor of psychiatry, received the National Association of Social Workers Vermont's Social Worker of the Year for 2010. Golden, who is a licensed clinical social worker and psychotherapist with expertise in clinical sexology in full-time private practice, holds a master's degree in social work and has completed post-graduate work in psychology and psychiatry. For the past forty-five years, she has lectured extensively at colleges, universities, in the general community, appeared on radio and television, served as a forensic consultant and expert witness for a variety of sexual issues and behaviors, and consulted in areas of reproductive health, mental health, social planning, communications and women's issues.

Lewis First, professor and chair of pediatrics, received the 2010 Holroyd-Sherry Award at the American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP) National Conference and Exhibition on October 2 in San Francisco. Presented annually by the AAP Council on Communications and Media, the Holroyd-Sherry Award recognizes an AAP member whose outstanding contributions have demonstrated the powerful influence mass media have on the health and well-being of children and adolescents. Honorees' work in the areas of advocacy, legislation, research, and professional or public education must address and/or suggest solutions to the health implications raised by child and adolescent use of media. The chief of the Children's Hospital at Fletcher Allen Health Care, First was recognized for his role in the program "First with Kids" -- a medical advice program for families, which airs on television and radio and is featured in a column in community newspapers.

October 20, 2010

Awards and Honors

Hajra Atiq, a Fulbright Scholar from Pakistan pursuing a master's degree in the Rubenstein School of Environment and Natural Resources, was chosen as one of five students from across the U.S. to speak at the Library of Congress on October 16, during the awarding of the annual Fulbright Prize, this year given to Bill and Melinda Gates.

Michael Farber, assistant professor of medicine and pediatrics and medical director of the Office of Vermont Health Access of the State of Vermont Agency of Human Services, has been selected by the National Quality Forum (NQF) to serve on a committee to address "Multiple Chronic Conditions Measurement Framework." NQF seeks to develop and endorse a Measurement Framework for Multiple Chronic Conditions as a foundation for the future endorsement of performance measures that address care for those with multiple chronic conditions.

Brooke Mossman, professor emerita of pathology who received her B.S., M.S. and Ph.D. degrees from UVM, received the 2010 Graduate Alumni Award during the College of Medicine's Graduate Student Research Day held October 14. The award recognizes alumni from the college's Ph.D. or M.S. programs who have demonstrated outstanding achievement in basic, clinical or applied research; education; industry; public service/humanitarianism; and/or outstanding commitment to the College of Medicine community. Mossman, who directs UVM's Environmental Pathology Program and has received continued federal funding throughout her career, is an internationally recognized expert on mesothelioma, an asbestos-related cancer of the lining of the lung or abdominal cavity. She has authored more than 250 journal articles, book chapters and other publications, and has served on the National Cancer Institute's Board of Scientific Counselors and the Environmental Protection Agency's Scientific Advisory Board.

October 13, 2010

Awards and Honors

Elizabeth Greene, professor of animal science, has been recognized by The National Institute of Food and Agriculture of the USDA for her work on UVM's eXtension HorseQuest Leadership Team. The team was awarded the 2010 National Partnership Award for Effective and Efficient Use of Resources, an honor Greene accepted on Oct. 6 in Washington, D.C. Greene has served as mentor, contributor and collaborator of the program, which includes a national team from the University of Kentucky, Rutgers University, and the University of Nebraska. They are noted for their "innovative program of offering free, interactive, peer-reviewed, online resources on a variety of equine-related topics," and "they have adapted traditional educational content to the online environment."

October 6, 2010

Awards and Honors

Major Jackson, professor of English, has published his third book of poetry, Holding Company ( W. W. Norton & Company) and is featured in the current issue of Poets & Writers.

Robert Manning, a professor in the Rubenstein School of Environment and Natural Resources at the University of Vermont, was was presented the Benton H. Box Award Oct. 29 at Clemson University’s annual George B. Hartzog Environmental Awards luncheon. The Benton H. Box Award recognizes a teacher who "inspires in students the quest for knowledge and encourages curriculum innovation," especially that which involves the environmental ethic.

Publications and Presentations

Joshua Hanson, clinical instructor in pathology and fourth-year pathology resident at Fletcher Allen Health Care, presented a poster titled "The Use of a Fat-Dissolving Solution in Identifying Lymph Nodes in Colon Cancer Resection Specimens" at the College of American Pathologists' 2010 Meeting in Chicago on September 26. Co-authors on the poster include Laura Schned, clinical instructor in pathology and second-year pathology resident, Michelle Schwartz, clinical instructor in pathology, Shelly Naud, research analyst in medical biostatistics, and Donald Weaver, professor of pathology.

Alan Wertheimer, professor emeritus of political science and senior research scholar at the Department of Bioethics, National Institutes of Health, has published Rethinking the Ethics of Clinical Research: Widening the Lens (Oxford University Press, 2010).

September 29, 2010

Awards and Honors

On September 26, Saleem Ali received a peace-building and environmental stewardship award from the Arava Institute, an educational institution in southern Israel. Ali, professor of environmental planning and Asian studies in the Rubenstein School of Environment and Natural Resources, was honored in a ceremony by the Friends of the Arava Institute at the Congregation Mishkan Tefila, in Chestnut Hill, Mass.. His acceptance remarks are here.

Issei Shimada, postdoctoral associate in the department of Medicine, received a travel award to attend the annual Society for Neuroscience (SfN) meeting in San Diego, CA, November 13-17, 2010. Generously supported by the SfN Memorial Fund, the SfN Postdoctoral Trainee Travel Award honors outstanding trainees. Issei will present his project at the meeting titled: "Isolation of reactive astrocyte-derived neural stem/progenitor cells from the peri-infarct area following stroke." Learn more about the Vermont Chapter of the Society for Neuroscience.

Richard "Mort" Wasserman, professor of pediatrics, received a $3.5 million Health Resources and Services Administration grant through his role as director of the American Academy of Pediatrics' Pediatric Research Network in the Office Setting, which is the nation's largest pediatric primary care research network. The funding will support development of an electronic health record sub-network within the Pediatric Research Network in the Office Setting. The results from this work will be used to inform guidelines and policies of pediatric practice.

Publications and Presentations

Associate Professor David Jones and Professor Barbara McIntosh, both of the School of Business Administration, published an article in the recent issue of the Journal of Vocational Behavior, titled "Organizational and occupational commitment in relation to bridge employment and retirement intentions." Using a sample of older-aged pharmacists, the results showed that their commitment to the occupation versus the employing organization differentially predicted their intentions to fully retire and to pursue various types of bridge employment (e.g., transitioning to full retirement by working fewer hours in the same job versus working in a different occupational field).

September 22, 2010

Awards and Honors

The Akraia Chapter at the University of Vermont was among the outstanding chapters to be honored for its excellence at the 2010 Mortar Board National Conference, held July 23-25 in Chicago. The group was one of 77 chapters to receive the Silver Torch Award, presented to chapters meeting chapter management standards while exemplifying the ideals of scholarship, leadership and service.

Lauren Arms and Sarah Corey, graduate students in the Neuroscience Graduate Program, and Megan Doczi, postdoctoral associate in the Department of Anatomy & Neurobiology, received travel awards to attend the annual Society for Neuroscience (SfN) meeting in San Diego, Cal., November 13-17, 2010. Generously supported by Eli Lilly & Co. and the SfN Memorial Fund, the SfN Graduate Student and Postdoctoral Trainee Travel Awards honor outstanding trainees nominated by their local SfN chapter. Awardees are chosen based on the scientific merit of the abstract, evidence of outreach activities, and letters of nomination from the principal investigator or mentor and the local nominating chapter. The trainees will present their following respective projects at the meeting: Lauren Arms, "Regulation and function of phosphorylated AKT in rat urinary bladder after cyclophosphamide (CYP) - induced cystitis"; Sarah Corey, "Inflammation model of body-based treatment for chronic musculoskeletal pain"; Megan Doczi, "Developmental Changes in Ionic Current and Leptin Response in the Avian Embryonic Arcuate Nucleus." Learn more about the Vermont Chapter of the Society for Neuroscience.

Kenneth Mann, professor of biochemistry and medicine, received the Henri Chaigneau International Prize of the Association Francaise des Hemophiles at an awards ceremony held during the Congress of the World Federation of Hemophilia in Buenos Aires, Argentina from July 10 to July 14. The award honors "the impact of (his) seminal work on phenotype and genotype on future therapeutic interventions for haemophiliac patients." This annual, juried award is in its 18th year.

Publications and Presentations

Dennis Mahoney, professor of German, recently published "'Ubi bene, ibi patria' oder: Amerika, hast du es besser?" in the Goethe-Jahrbuch. In this article he discusses how the literary sources Goethe drew on for his knowledge of the United States explain the rather pessimistic image of the country in Goethe's novel Wilhelm Meisters Wanderjahre. Mahoney is also the author of an encyclopedia entry on Romanticism which appeared in the Enzyklopädie der Neuzeit.

Russell Tracy, professor of pathology and biochemistry, co-authored a Plenary Paper in the July 1, 2010 issue of the journal Blood, titled "Duffy antigen receptor for chemokines (Darc) polymorphism regulates circulating concentrations of monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 and other inflammatory mediators." Only one paper is noted as such in each issue of this journal.

September 15, 2010

Awards and Honors

The Wilderness Society announced the 2010 recipient of the Gloria Barron Scholarship. The $10,000 annual scholarship was awarded to graduate student Rose Graves. Tom Barron, a Wilderness Society Governing Council Member, created this scholarship in honor of his mother Gloria Barron who is a dedicated educator and tireless advocate for wilderness protection. Through this scholarship, Barron "hopes to encourage some of our nation's best conservationists at a crucial point in their careers. We want nothing less than to identify, support, and honor the future Aldo Leopolds in our midst -- as well as future Rachel Carsons, Mardy Muries, John Muirs, Howard Zahnisers, Bob Marshalls, and Gaylord Nelsons."

Luther Martin, professor of religion was honored at the XXth Quinquennial World Congress of the International Association for the History of Religions (IAHR) by becoming an "Honorary Life Member" of the IAHR, an honor conferred every five years on no more than five senior scholars in the field. Martin was also presented with a festschrift at the event, where he chaired a panel on "Data from Dead Minds? Challenges on the Interface of History and Religions (in Graeco-Roman Antiquity) and the Cognitive Science of Religion." Erica Andrus, lecturer in religion, also attended the Congress and chaired the section on "Alternative Approaches to Understanding Religion" in which she presented the paper, "Monotheism and the Debunking of the Clash of Civilizations in American Popular Culture.

Jill Jemison, instructional technology director and technology services co-director at the College of Medicine, was named chair-elect of the Association of American Medical Colleges' Group on Informational Resources at the Group's May 2010 Spring Meeting in Scottsdale, Ariz.

Publications and Presentations

David Brock, assistant professor of rehabilitation and movement sciences, published an article titled "Differences emerge in visceral adipose tissue accumulation after selection for innate cardiovascular fitness" in the July 20, 2010 Advance Online publication of the International Journal of Obesity.

Wolfgang Mieder, professor of German, published "Spruchschlösser (ab)bauen." Sprichwörter, Antisprichwörter und Lehnsprichwörter in Literatur und Medien. The volume comprises 20 of Mieder's essays tracing the use of proverbs and proverbial expressions in contemporary aphorisms, poems and everyday speech. Mieder also published an article titled "'Der Mensch lebt nicht vom Brot allein.' Vom Bibelsprichwort über das Volkssprichwort zum Antisprichwort" that analyzes the various interpretations of the biblical proverb "Not by bread alone" in German literature. In addition, Professor Mieder is the author of "The Golden Rule as a Political Imperative for the World: President Barack Obama’s Proverbial Message Abroad." In this article, Mieder argues that Barack Obama's use of proverbial language gives his speeches a colloquial and metaphorical expressiveness that enables him to communicate effectively with people of different ethnic and social backgrounds.

Rory Waterman, assistant professor in the Department of Chemistry, and Sarah Leshinski (M.S. in chemistry, 2010) coauthored a paper titled "Insertion reactivity of a triamidoamine-supported zirconium complex" in the journal Dalton Transactions. The paper, which is available online, will be in print later this year. Waterman and chemistry PhD student Andrew Reoring each gave presentations at the 240th American Chemical Society National Meeting in Boston.

Denise J. Youngblood, professor of history, co-authored Cinematic Cold War: The American and Soviet Struggle for Hearts and Minds, University Press of Kansas, 2010.

September 8, 2010

Awards and Honors

The American University in a Postsecular Age: Religion and the Academy, co-edited by Douglas Jacobsen and Rhonda Hustedt Jacobsen, published by Oxford University Press, 2009, and containing a chapter titled "The Different Spiritualities of the Students We Teach," co-authored by Robert J. Nash, professor of integrated professional studies, and DeMethra L. Bradley, assistant dean for Student Services, has won the highly prestigious 2010 Lilly Fellows Program Book Award.

Publications and Presentations

Daniel Gade, professor emeritus of geography, has published in recent months the following: "Formation régionale et force denominative des Bois Francs au Québec," Cahiers de Géographie du Québec, Vol.53, pp.7-27; "Shifting Synanthropy of the Crow in Eastern North America," Geographical Review, Vol. 100, pp. 152-175; and "Sucre, Bolivia, and the Quiddity of Place," Journal of Latin American Geography, Vol. 9, 99-117.

Wolfgang Mieder, Professor of German co-edited Phraseologie global—areal—regional, an essay volume containing 43 of the 200 presentations given at the international conference EUROPHRAS at Helsinki, August 13-16, 2008. Mieder was also involved in editing the remaining presentations which will be made available on a CD. In addition, Wolfgang Mieder edited three decades of his correspondence with UCLA folklorist Shirley L. Aurora which was published in a volume entitled True Friends Are Like Diamonds.

Azur Moulaert, research associate in the Community Development and Applied Economics Department, is the lead author on a recent report "Applied Solutions Across Disciplines for the Sustainable Development of the Terraba-Sierpe Region of Costa Rica." With leadership from several UVM researchers, an international team explored this important mangrove wilderness area, gathering ecological, land use, and cultural data, and contributing expert information to a management plan aimed at sustainable development and conservation.

Helga Schreckenberger, chair of German and Russian, is the author of the article "Suffering from Austria: Social Criticism in Prose Fiction of the Seventies and Eighties" published in Shadows of the Past. Austrian Literature of the Twentieth Century, ed. by Hans Schulte & Gerald Chapple. Schreckenberger disputes the notion of a predominantly apolitical Austrian literature by tracing critical reactions to Austria's social and political structures in the literature of the 1970s and 1980s.

September 1, 2010

Awards and Honors

Joshua Bongard, assistant professor of computer science, has been named the recipient of a National Science Foundation CAREER Award by Division of Information & Intelligent Systems. This prestigious award, in the amount of approximately $310,000, supports the early career-development activities of those teacher-scholars who most effectively integrate research and education within the context of the mission of their organization. Read the full story.

Yves Dubief, assistant professor of mechanical engineering, received $400,000 from the National Science Foundation and will lead a collaborative effort with Christopher White from the Mechanical Engineering Department of the University of New Hampshire. White will conduct an experimental investigation of turbulent ablation of low-melting point temperature materials. Dubief and his students will perform massively parallel simulations of similar flows using the Vermont Advanced Computing Center and NSF Teragrids. Read the full story.

Jane Hill, assistant professor in the School of Engineering, has been named as the recipient of the 2010 Milt Silveira Distinguished Faculty Award by Bernard "Chip" Cole, interim dean of the UVM College of Engineering and Mathematical Sciences. The award consists of a plaque and is accompanied by a $2,000 prize. This award, established in 2008 by Milton Silveira, recognizes the junior faculty member in the College of Engineering and Mathematical Sciences who "best embodies a 'pioneering spirit,' drive and potential to succeed at the highest levels of his or her profession." Read the full story.

At the annual Academy of Management (AOM) meeting this August, David Jones, associate professor in the School of Business Administration, and his co-authors, Chelsea Willness (University of Saskatchewan) and Sarah Madey (a UVM graduate), presented a paper titled, "Why are job seekers attracted to socially responsible companies? Testing underlying mechanisms." They were honored to have their paper chosen for inclusion in the best paper proceedings. David was also the recipient of a 2010 Outstanding Reviewer Award from AOM's Organizational Behavior Division. At the editorial board meeting for the Journal of Organizational Behavior held at the same conference, David received an Excellence in Reviewing award, and was chosen as runner-up for the best 2009 article published in the journal (Jones, 2009: "Getting even with one's supervisor and one's organization: Relationships among types of injustice, desires for revenge, and counterproductive work behaviors").

George Pinder, professor of Civil and Environmental Engineering, has been elected to the National Academy of Engineering, one of the highest professional distinctions accorded to an engineer. The Vermont Academy of Science and Engineering (VASE) will celebrate this accomplishment at its snnual meeting on Wednesday, Sept, 15 in Davis Auditorium at UVM at 5 pm. Pinder, a member of VASE, will speak on, "Computer Aided Solutions to Environmental Problems: The Case for Ground Water."

The American Society of Horticultural Science honored the UVM Horticulture Club with the "2010 Outstanding Club Award" in the "small club" category. This is the third time in 10 years that the UVM Horticulture Club has won this national award

John Voight, assistant professor in the Department of Mathematics and Statistics, received the Selfridge Prize for the best paper presented during the Ninth Algorithmic Number Theory Symposium (ANTS IX) held July 19-23, 2010 at INRIA in Nancy, France. Voight, in recognition for his paper titled, "Computing automorphic forms on Shimura curves over fields with arbitrary class number". Read the full story.

Publications and Presentations

Christopher W. Allen, emeritus professor of chemistry, coauthored (with Robert Hayes) an article titled "Polymerization of Cyclophosphazenes with Spriocyclic Methacrylate Containing Substituents" which appeared in the Journal of Inorganic and Organometallic Polymers, 20, 528( 2010). He recently attended the International Conference on Phosphorus Chemistry in Wroclaw Poland and visited the Center of Polymer Chemistry of the Polish Academy of Sciences in Zabrze Poland as well as the Chemistry Department of the University of Opole also in Poland.

Robert V. Bartlett, Gund Professor of Liberal Arts, Political Science Department, attended a workshop on Earth System Governance: Accountability, Legitimacy, and Democracy in Wageningen, The Netherlands on June 28-29, 2010. Bartlett and his co-author, Walter F. Baber of California State University Long Beach, were invited to the workshop to present their research paper on "Juristic Democracy: A Deliberative Common Law Strategy for Earth System Governance," which had originally been presented at the Conference on the Human Dimensions of Global Environmental Change--Earth System Governance: People, Places, and the Planet, Amsterdam, on Dec. 2, 2009.

Wolfgang Mieder, professor in the Department of German and Russian, published International Bibliography of Paremiology and Phraseology with the prestigious German De Gruyter publishing house. The two volumes list 10,027 publications in the fields of paremiology and phraseology. Each bibliographical entry is followed by a number of alphabetically arranged key-words. In addition, the bibliography contains both a subject and a name index. In addition, Mieder edited Proverb Semantics. Studies in Structure, Logic, and Metaphor, a collection of the most important articles by the Estonian folklorist and paremiologist Arvo Krikmann. Mieder is also the author of the article "'Theorie erklärt, Praxis lehrt.' Zu den sprichtwörtlichen Aphorismen von Hans-Jürgen Quadbeck-Seeger," which provides an overview and analysis of the aphoristic writings of the renowned German chemist Hans-Jürgen Quadbeck-Seeger.

July 28, 2010

Awards and Honors

The International Mineralogical Association's commission on new minerals approved a nomination from researchers at Maimi University to name a mineral in honor of provost emeritus and professor of geology John Hughes. The mineral, vanadium oxide Hughesite (Na3Al(V10O28)*22H2O), was named to honor his life-long contributions to mineral structures,chemistry, and classification using X-ray techniques.

Rory Waterman, assistant professor of chemistry, was named to the editorial board of the journal Current Chemical Research.

Publications and Presentations

Robert V. Bartlett, Gund Professor of Liberal Arts, Political Science Department, presented a paper, "Loss Aversion and Rationality in Cutback Management: A Deliberative Democratic Approach to Contingent Valuation" at the Sixth Transatlantic Dialogue held at the R. Goodwin Faculty of Economics at the University of Siena in Siena, Italy, June 2010. The paper was co-authored by William Moore and Walter F. Baber.

Ted Flanagan, emeritus Professor of chemistry, presented invited talks in May 2010 at Sandia National Laboratory, Livermore Cal. titled "The Effect of Non-ideality on the Diffusion Parameters of H in Pd and its Alloys" and at Choonam University, Gwangju, South Korea titled "The Pd and Pd Alloy-H Systems". Flanagan and his co-workers published the following articles: "Hydrogen Solubilities and Permeabilities in Un-oxidized and Partially Internally Oxidized fcc Pd-Fe and (Pd0.77 Ag0.23)1-xFex Alloys", Journal of Alloys and Compounds, vol. 488 (2010) 72-78 and "Thermodynamics of Hydrogen in fcc Pd-Au Alloys", J. Physical Chemistry B, vol. 114 (2010) 6117-6125.

June 30, 2010

Awards and Honors

Professor Robert Manning has been selected by the National Recreation and Park Association as this year's winner of the Theodore and Franklin Roosevelt Award for Excellence in Recreation and Park Research. This award recognizes Manning's sustained program of excellent research. The award will be presented at the NRPA Congress in the fall.

Judith Van Houten, University Distinguished Professor and Vermont State EPScoR Director, was elected Vice- Vice Chair of the NSF EPSCoR Project Director's Executive Committee at the May 2010 Project Directors Meeting in Arlington, Virginia. There are 29 EPSCoR states and jurisdictions including Vermont. Van Houten also assumes the Chair of the National IDeA PI Association Council Executive Committee in June 2010. Currently she serves as Vice-Chair. The Vermont Academy of Arts & Science (VAAS) Board of Trustees elected Van Houten as a Fellow of the Academy in 2010. The VAAS Fellow criteria states that Fellows must: "have made an extraordinary contribution in or to the arts, humanities, science or teaching; Contributions must have made a substantial impact on the life and conditions in Vermont." The board recognized Van Houten for her "work as a scientist and as a teacher and mentor to students which together have made a substantial impact on life and conditions in Vermont." The Board went on the cite especially Van Houten's contributions as the "Vermont State Director of EPSCoR, the HELiX Program, and the Vermont Genetics Network". Of particular note was her "work to keep students interested in science". Van Houten will be presented with her award at the annual conference, this year on "Utilizing Wood Chips as a Source of Renewable Energy" at Green Mountain College in Poultney, Vermont on Oct. 2.

May 26, 2010

Awards and Honors

Kalev Freeman, assistant professor of surgery, was recently appointed to serve as a research methodology editor on the editorial board of the Annals of Emergency Medicine.

Publications and Presentations

Robert Althoff, assistant professor of psychiatry, published a paper titled "Dysregulated children reconsidered" in the April 2010 Journal of the American Academy of Adolscent Psychiatry.

James Hudziak, professor of psychiatry, is a coauthor of a paper titled "Moderation of genetic factors by parental divorce in adolescents' evaluations of family functioning and subjective wellbeing" in the April 2010 Twin Research and Human Genetics.

Gail Rose, research assistant professor of psychiatry, was lead author of a study titled "Utility of Prompting Physicians for Brief Alcohol Intervention" in the May 2010 issue of the journal Substance Use & Misuse. Co-authors on the paper include John Helzer, professor emeritus of psychiatry, and Dennis Plante, associate professor of medicine.

May 5, 2010

Awards and Honors

Christopher Berger, associate professor of molecular physiology & biophysics, has been named director of graduate student education at the College of Medicine. In this new role, which reports to Senior Associate Dean for Research Ira Bernstein, Berger will have responsibility for coordinating support for existing College of Medicine graduate student programs, as well as helping to guide the reorganization and realignment of the graduate student biomedical programs affiliated with the College of Medicine.

Wolfgang Mieder, professor of German, was elected to membership in the P.E.N. Center for German-Speaking Authors Abroad, which is a chapter of the International P.E.N. Club.

Scott Morrical, professor of biochemistry, accepted an invitation to serve a four-year term as a member of the Molecular Genetics A Study Section of the Center for Scientific Review at the National Institutes of Health begining July 1, 2010. Members are selected on the basis of their demonstrated competence and acheivement in their scientific discipline as evidenced by the quality of research accomplishments, publications in scientific journals, and other significant scientific activities, achievements and honors.

Fred Friendly Seminars and Vermont Public Television (VPT) were selected to jointly receive the National Alliance on Mental Illness (NAMI) Outstanding Media Award for Public Service in recognition of the national PBS-broadcasted program's contribution to public education and VPT's community engagement campaign. NAMI cited the notable role of Thomas Simpatico, professor and director of public psychiatry, as a panelist in the national Fred Friendly program, as well as in VPT's "boot camp" for legislators, town hall screenings and other local activities in their award notice. The award will be presented at NAMI's national convention in Washington, D.C. on July 3, 2010.

Burton Sobel, professor of medicine and biochemistry, was presented with an inaugural Distinguished Scientist Award at the Society for Experimental Biology (SEBM) annual meeting in Anaheim, Calif. on April 25. The award, which was presented to eight past presidents of SEBM, including Sobel, recognizes biomedical scientists whose seminal research accomplishments have established them as leaders in biomedicine, and who have made significant contributions to SEBM.

Publications and Presentations

Richard Pratley, professor of medicine and director of the Diabetes and Metabolism Translational Medicine Unit, is lead author of a paper in the April 24 Lancet titled "Liraglutide versus sitagliptin for patients with type 2 diabetes who did not have adequate glycaemic control with metformin: a 26-week, randomised, parallel-group, open-label trial".

Susan Wallace, professor and chair of microbiology and molecular genetics, is lead author of a March 16 paper in Proceedings of the National Academy of Science titled "The mouse ortholog of NEIL3 is a functional DNA glycosylase in vitro and in vivo." Co-authors on the paper include Minmin Liu, graduate student in microbiology and molecular genetics, and Jeffrey Bond, research associate professor of microbiology and molecular genetics.

An advanced copy of "Insertion Reactions and Catalytic Hydrophosphination by Triamidoamine-Supported Zirconium Complexes," an article by Rory Waterman, assistant professor, graduate students Andrew Roering and Sarah Leshinski, and former Project SEED researcher Stephanie Chan in the Department of Chemistry, has appeared on the website of the journal Organometallics in advance of print. The work describes the Waterman group's efforts in bond formation between carbon and phosphorus to make biologically relevant molecules.

April 28, 2010

Publications and Presentations

Carlene Raper, associate professor of microbiology and molecular genetics, emerita, is joint author of the introductory chapter, "History and Importance [of Fungi] to Human Affairs" in the book Cellular and Molecular Biology of Filamentous Fungi, eds. K. A. Borkovich and D. J. Ebbole, ASM Press, January, 2010. The chapter, co-written by Joan Bennett and Rowland Davis, traces the history of fungi from 185 BCE when such organisms were considered "the evil ferment of the earth" through a few centuries later when they were thought of as "bastard plants derived by spontaneous generation, possibly from thunder" to the present time as organisms of the Fungal Kingdom more akin to animals than plants. Research with fungi have revealed their importance as carbon recyclers, benefactors of forest growth, animal and plant pathogens, producers of food products and antibiotics, as well as model organisms for studying an array of biological phenomena such as metabolism, cell cycle, environmental sensing, and regulation of gene expression.

April 14, 2010

Publications and Presentations

Saleem Ali, associate professor of environmental studies, has been invited to speak at a Congressional Briefing before the U.S. Commission on Security and Cooperation in Europe on April 15. Part of a three-person panel discussion on "Natural Resources, A National Responsibility," Ali will speak to this independent federal agency chaired by U.S. Senator Benjamin L. Cardin (D-MD) and Congressman Alcee L. Hastings (D-FL). Ali will draw on his expertise in mineral and resource extraction and policy. He is the author of the new book Treasures of the Earth: Need, Greed and a Sustainable Future.

April 7, 2010

Publications and Presentations

David Jones, assistant professor in the School of Business Administration, is presenting three papers at scholarly conferences this year. At the annual meeting of the Society for Industrial and Organizational Psychology this April, David presented a paper, co-authored by Derek Chapman (University of Calgary), titled "Is unfair stronger than fair?" in which they found that degrees of perceived unfairness are more predictive of employee behavior than degrees of perceived fairness. At that same conference, David and Chelsea Willness (Brock University) presented a paper, titled "Making green by being green: How environmentally-friendly practices affect recruitment." This August at the annual meeting of the Academy of Management, David and his co-authors, Willness and UVM grad Sarah Madey, are presenting a paper titled, "Why are some job seekers attracted to socially responsible companies? Testing underlying mechanisms," that is based on an independent research study completed by Sarah when she was an undergraduate business major at UVM. Their paper was also chosen for inclusion in the 2010 AOM Best Paper Proceedings.

March 31, 2010

Publications and Presentations

Rory Waterman, assistant professor, and graduate students Michael Ghebreab and Andrew Roering from the Department of Chemistry each gave presentations on research at the American Chemical Society National Meeting in San Francisco.

Awards and Honors

The Davis Center was recognized by the National Association of College Auxiliary Services as a leader in the area of environmental stewardship. Read more in "Walking the Walk" in the NACAS College Services publication.

March 17, 2010

Awards and Honors

Bill Ballard, associate vice president of administrative and facilities services and long-standing advisor of UVM Rescue, was named the National Collegiate EMS Foundation Outstanding Collegiate EMS Advisor of the Year. Ballard has been the advisor for UVM Rescue for 17 years, overseeing many changes, including the acquisition of several new ambulances, the addition of billing for service, and the redistricting of UVM Rescue's primary service area. The National Collegiate EMS Foundation says the purpose of this award is to "honor a faculty advisor or college administrator who has given a significant amount of time and effort to the organization and success of a campus-based EMS organization." UVM Rescue is an entirely student run EMS squad operating at the EMT-Intermediate level, providing primary service to the UVM Campus, helipad, and University Health Center. It's also an active part of the Vermont EMS District 3 mutual aid plan, providing secondary and tertiary service to much of Chittenden County.

Senior Robert Just was elected to the regional board of directors of the North East Affiliate of College and University Residence Halls (NEACURH). NEACURH is one of eight regions within the National Association of College and University Residence Halls (NACURH), which is the largest student-run organization in the world and has a national board of directors composed of undergraduate and graduate students. Just was appointed associate director of administration and finance, which serves both on the regional and national board. He's the first student from UVM to serve in this capacity and is also the first student since Kenrick Ali '96 to hold a position on the regional board.

College of Medicine Dean Frederick C. Morin, College of Nursing and Health Sciences Dean Patricia Prelock and Fletcher Allen CEO Melinda Estes have announced the appointment of Michael Ricci, professor of surgery, as director of clinical simulation at UVM/Fletcher Allen. Ricci has provided leadership for the development of clinical simulation programs and other innovative educational initiatives over the years and served as clinical director of telemedicine from 1996 to 2004. Since joining UVM/Fletcher Allen in 1989, Ricci has also served as vice chair of surgery and director of the division of surgical research and was chief of vascular surgery from 2002 to 2005, when he was named vice president for clinical services at Fletcher Allen.

Frank Zelko, assistant professor of history, participated in two-week study trip in January and February to Germany and Denmark as part of the Round Table USA group, a program organized by a consortium of German foundations and designed to foster trans-Atlantic relations. The subject of this year's Round Table was "Societies in Transition: Energy, Climate and Oceans--Impacts on the Global Economy." Zelko, an expert on environmental history, and other invited scholars and journalists from around the world, met with members of the Foreign Affairs Committee of the German Bundestag and well as with European environmental experts, including the Lykke Friis, the new Danish Minister for Climate and Energy; Klaus Topfer, former director of the UN Environment Program; Jacqueline McGlade, executive director of the European Environment Agency; and numerous others.

March 3, 2010

Publications and Presentations

Judith Aiken, associate professor of education is author of "Curriculum Reconceptualists" which appeared in the recently published 2-volume Encyclopedia of Educational Reform and Dissent.

The late Glen Elder, associate dean of the College of Arts and Sciences and associate professor of geography, was lead author on a paper, "The Geography of Civil Union Households,: published in the January to March 2010 issue of the Journal of GLBT Family Studies. Sondra Solomon, associate professor of psychology and their colleague Esther Rothblum, now at San Diego State University, coauthored the article.

Garrison Nelson, professor of political science, presented a paper with Maggie Taylor (UVM '08), " Due Diligence: The Senate and the Supreme Court Confirmation Process, 1937-2009," and served on the roundtable "The Party System in the Obama Era: An Eye Toward 2010 and 2012" and as a discussant on the panel "Issues, "Ideology, and Party Development," at the 41st Annual Meeting of the Northeastern Political Science Association, November 19-21 in Philadelphia. His most recent articles are "Vermont," in Donald P. Haider-Merkel, ed., Political Encyclopedia of U.S. States and Regions, and "Running from New England: Will It Ever Lead the Nation Again?" for the online New England Journal of Political Science.

Travis Nelson, assistant professor of political science, served as a chair/discussant on the panel "New and Critical Approaches to International Relations," and as a discussant on the panel, "Civil War and Peace" at the 41st Annual Meeting of the Northeastern Political Science Association, November 19-21 in Philadelphia.

Gail Rose, research assistant professor of psychiatry, authored a paper in February 2 online edition of the Journal of General Internal Medicine titled "Interactive Voice Response Technology Can Deliver Alcohol Screening and Brief Intervention in Primary Care." Co-authors on the paper include Charles MacLean, professor of medicine, Joan Skelly, researcher/analyst in medical biostatistics, Gary Badger, researcher/analyst in medical biostatistics, Tonya Ferraro, psychiatry staff member, and John Helzer, professor emeritus of psychiatry.

February 24, 2010

Awards and Honors

Senior Lecturer Amy Tomas has been selected as one of ten marketing professors nationally to receive the 2010 Hormel Meritorious Teaching Award. Tomas, who was nominated by Dean Larry Shirland, will be recognized at the Marketing Management Association conference for her commitment to teaching excellence. The conference will be held on March 25 in Chicago

The women's swimming team was recognized with the College Swimming Coaches Association of Ameria Scholar All-American Team honors for the 2009 fall semester. To earn these honors, a swimming team must have a minimum of a 3.0 GPA for the semester.

February 17, 2010

Publications and Presentations

Christopher Koliba, associate professor of community development and applied economics, recently presented a paper titled, "The Analysis of Complex Governance System Dynamics: Emergent Patterns of Formation, Operation and Performance of Regional Planning Networks," at the Policy Informatics Workshop at Arizona State's Decision Theater. Koliba, along with Asim Zia, assistant professor, CDAE, will have an article titled, "Gordian Knot or Integrated Theory? Critical Conceptual Considerations for Governance Network Analysis" published in "The Future of Governance: 5th Annual TransAtlantic Dialogue Proceedings." Koliba's article, "Communities of Practice as an Empirical Construct: Implications for Theory and Practice," published in the International Journal of Public Administration, was recognized as the most frequently downloaded article of 2009.

Awards and Honors

Two faculty in the Department of Animal Science received grants from the USDA-NIFA, Agriculture and Food Research Initiative competitive program. Julie Smith, Extension dairy specialist in the Department of Animal Science, and collaborators were awarded $470,894 to study "Costs and Challenges Associated with Developing and Implementing a Community-wide Biosecurity Plan." Dr. Smith will lead this dairy and community-centric integrated research and extension project in collaboration with Robert Parsons, UVM Extension Agricultural Department of Community Development and Applied Economics, and Ellen Rowe, UVM Extension community and leadership specialist. David Kerr, associate professor of animal science, received $360,000 to study "Effects of Variation in Pathogen Detection and Signaling Pathways on Resistance to Bovine Mastitis." Graduate students, Sukumar Kandasamy and Benjamin Green, will work with Dr. Kerr.

February 10, 2010

Publications and Presentations

Judith Shaw, research associate professor of pediatrics and executive director of the Vermont Child Health Improvement Program, was interviewed live at the Vermont Council for Quality 2009 Fall Quality Conference on December 7 by WDEV radio program host Mark Johnson regarding her presentation topic "State Improvement Partnerships."

Sharyl Toscano, assistant professor of nursing, published an article titled "The Lived Experience of Pregnancy via IVF" in the November 2009 Health Care for Women International. The study both explores the positive and negative emotions that accompany the experience of pregnancy via in vitro fertilization (IVF) as well as investigates the psychological impact of sharing these experiences on an on-line community support system.

Awards and Honors

The College of Medicine Class of 2012 held an awards ceremony and reception on Jan. 29 in honor of their completion of the Foundations level of the Vermont Integrated Curriculum (VIC). Foundations is the first of three levels in the medical curriculum, which the class began in August 2008. The awards, which were presented by class representatives Tristram Arscott, Andrew Erb, Martha Choate Monson, and Auna Otts, included:

Outstanding Foundations Course: Cardiovascular, Respiratory and Renal Systems

Foundations Course Director Award: William Hopkins, associate professor of medicine and course director, Cardiovascular, Respiratory and Renal Systems

Foundations Teaching Award: William Hopkins, associate professor of medicine. The recipient of this award will be hooding the Class of 2012 at their graduation and will be recognized with other Teachers of the Year from the past.

The Dean Warshaw Integration Award: Richard Salerno, assistant professor of pediatrics. This award recognizes the faculty member whose teaching best captured the spirit of the VIC.

The Silver Stethoscope Award (a.k.a. "Inspirational Cameo of the Year"): Lewis First, professor and chair of pediatrics. This award recognizes the faculty member who had few lecture hours, but made a substantial contribution to students' education.

Above and Beyond Award: Ellen Cornbrooks, lecturer in anatomy and neurobiology. This award recognizes the faculty member (not necessarily a lecturer) who went above and beyond the call of duty to help the students in their learning objectives.

Best Support Staff (Non-teaching): Mike Cross, custodial maintenance worker. This award recognizes the staff member who best supported students in areas besides teaching.

Outstanding Department Award: Pathology

Outstanding Teaching Assistant Award: Michael Goedde, Class of 2009, clinical instructor and resident in psychiatry at Fletcher Allen Health Care.

In addition, student representatives of the American Medical Student Association (AMSA) and American Medical Women's Association (AMWA) Student Chapter presented the AMSA Golden Apple Award for Excellence in Teaching to William Hopkins, associate professor of medicine; the AMWA Gender Equity Award to Jean Szilva, lecturer in anatomy and neurobiology, in recognition of her promotion of a gender-fair environment for the education and training of physicians.

January 27, 2010

Publications and Presentations

Christopher W. Allen, emeritus professor of chemistry, co-authored a paper titled "1-Methyl-1-Vinyl-3,3,5,5-Tetraphenylcyclotrisoxane: An Organofunctional Cyclotrisiloxane" in the Journal of Inorganic and Organometallic Polymers and Materials. He also wrote a book review of Inorganic Rings and Polymers of the p-Block Elements: From Fundamentals to Applications by T. Chivers and I. Manners which appeared in the Journal of the American chemical Society.

Saulius Butenas, research associate professor of biochemistry, is lead author of a January 29 article in The Journal of Biological Chemistry titled "Carbohydrates and Activity of Natural and Recombinant Tissue Factor". Coauthors on the paper include Jolanta Krudysz-Amblo, senior lab/research technician in biochemistry, Kenneth Mann, professor of biochemistry and medicine, and Mark Jennings, research associate in medicine and the proteomics facility.

Richard Greggory Johnson III, associate professor of education, is coeditor of a new series of books for Peter Lang Publishing, Black Studies in Critical Thinking. The series will include books for individuals and classroom use, an online journal, and supplemental web-based content.

Mark Nelson, professor and chair of pharmacology, is lead author of an article titled "Astrocytic endfoot Ca2+ and BK channels determine both arteriolar dilation and constriction" in the January 18-22 PNAS (Proceedings of the National Academy of Science) Online Early Edition. Coauthors include Helene Girouard, former postdoctoral associate in pharmacology, Adrian Bonev, research assistant professor of pharmacology, and Rachael Hannah, neuroscience graduate student.

January 20, 2010

Publications and Presentations

Michael Giangreco, professor of education, and Jesse Suter, research assistant professor of education, are co-authors of two forthcoming journal articles and a book chapter: "Guidelines for selecting alternatives to overreliance on paraprofessionals: Field-testing in inclusion-oriented schools" will appear in Remedial and Special Education, "Recent research on paraprofessionals in inclusion-oriented schools" will appear in the Journal of Educational and Psychological Consultation, and "Supporting students with disabilities in inclusive classrooms: Personnel and peers" will appear in Confronting obstacles to inclusion: International responses to developing inclusive schools (Routledge).

Jennifer Hurley, assistant professor of integrated professional studies, is author of "Promoting self-determination in students with developmental disabilities: A review," to appear in Intellectuals with Developmental Disabilities.

Awards and Honors

Two UVM students are winners of the Biophysical Society's 2010 student travel award to attend the organization's 54th Annual Meeting at the Moscone Convention Center in San Francisco, Ca., Feb. 20-24. The recipients of this competitive award are selected based on scientific merit, with priority given to those who will present a paper at the conference. Justin Decarreau will present "Loop 1's Role in a Novel Step on the ADP Release Pathway of Smooth Muscle," and Matthew Nystoriak, from the College of Medicine, will present "KV Channel Suppression and Enhanced CaV Arterioles from Subarachnoid Hemorrhage Model Rats."

UVM Environmental Safety recognized the 2009 winners of the "Excellence in Laboratory and Community Safety Leadership" awards at the annual Laboratory Safety Partnership Meeting in December. The winners included Sayamwong Hammack (Jom) and John Green from the Department of Psychology, John Barlow from the Animal Science Department, Mildred Beltre from the Art Department, Michael Rosen from the College of Engineering, Ed Curtiss from the Biology Department, Shelley Jurkiewicz from the Biochemistry Department, and Travis Verret, Mike McCormack and Jodi Wyman from the Chemistry Department.

The Excellence in Laboratory and Community Safety Leadership awards are given annually to a few laboratory faculty and/or staff who exhibit extraordinary attention to UVM's Laboratory Safety Program protocols and procedures. Also included may be those who have gone above and beyond the required laboratory safety protocols to make their work areas safe for all who may enter.

Greek Life at UVM received the national award for diversity initiative from the Association of Fraternity/Sorority Advisors at the Annual Meeting held in Jacksonville, Fla. Established in 1994, this award is presented to an individual, institution or organization that has contributed significantly to the development of multicultural relations or diversity education in a college or university fraternity/sorority community.

December 9, 2009

Publications and Presentations

Penny Bishop, associate professor of education, together with John Downes graduate teaching fellow, are authors of "Technology and learning in the middle grades" to appear in the second edition of What Research Says to the Middle Level Practitioner . Bishop and Cynthia Reyes, associate professor of education, have co-authored "The hazards of engaging teacher identity in preservice teacher education" in to appear in Teacher Identity and the Struggle for Recognition. Bishop has also co-authored The Education of Years 7-10 Students in New Zealand with Nicola Durling and Lisa Ng from the New Zealand Ministry of Education.

In a recent Dalton Transactions editorial, assistant professor of chemistry Rory Waterman's article "Metal-Phosphido and -Phosphinidene Complexes in P—E Bond-Forming Reactions" was noted as one of the top ten most cited articles in that journal for 2009.

December 2, 2009

Publications and Presentations

Judith Aiken, associate professor of education, has recently had two articles accepted for publication. The first, co-authored with Wanda Heading-Grant, associate provost for multicultural affairs, titled, "Faculty Mentors and their Perspectives on Cross-Cultural Mentoring Relationships," will appear in Women of Color and Leadership: Taking Their Rightful Place, a book edited by Richard Johnson, III, associate professor of education, and Gigi Harris. Aiken's second article, co-authored with Cynthia Gerstl-Pepin, chair of the Department of Education, is titled "Democratic School Leaders Advocating for Ethical Responsibility in a Standardized Context" and will appear in the Journal of School Leadership

Several Master's Entry Program in Nursing (MEPN) students, along with their community partners and Rycki Maltby, associate professor of nursing, will deliver poster presentations at the Research & Evidence-Based Practice Symposium presented by the Kappa Tau Chapter of the Sigma Theta Tau International Honor Society of Nursing and Fletcher Allen Health Care at Davis Auditorium on Dec. 4 and 5. Presentations and their respective MEPN student presenters include: "Health screening and medical assessment workshop plan for the 2010 Northeast Organic Farmers Association Conference" by Sarah DeSilvey, Callan Janowiec, Molly Michaud, Sally Kerschner, and Hendrika Maltby; "Senior aging safely at home (SASH) program assessments" by Bethany Bartlett, Mohamad Moussawi, Margaret Aitken, Elizabeth Davis, Nancy Eldridge, Molly Dugan, and Hendrika Maltby; "Health and well-being of Lamoille County residents" by Celeste Michaud, Ruth Polishuk, Katy Cahill, Linda Shaw, and Hendrika Maltby.

Awards and Honors

A journal article authored by David Brock, assistant professor of rehabilitation and movement science, was featured on the MDLinx.com site on Oct. 14. Titled "Perception of Exercise Difficulty Predicts Weight Regain in Formerly Overweight Women," the article appears in the Oct. 8 epub version of the journal Obesity. MDLinx provides an index of articles of interest to physicians and other healthcare professionals. Every day MDLinx sends almost 1 million free briefings across 35 specialty areas.

Biology major Dan Koenemann was a finalist for a Rhodes Scholarship in November. Koenemann was a winner of the prestigious Goldwater Scholarship in the spring of 2008.

November 18, 2009

Publications and Presentations

Robert J. Kelm, Jr., associate professor of biochemistry, is co-author of a paper in the November 20 Journal of Biological Chemistry titled "A Bifunctional Intronic Element Regulates the Expression of the Arginine/Lysine Transporter Cat-1 via Mechanisms Involving the Purine-rich Element Binding Protein A (Purα)".

Aaron Kindsvatter, visiting assistant professor of integrated professional studies, has co-authored an article, titled, "Client perceptions of pre-treatment change," that will be published in the Journal of Counseling and Development.

Fabiola Parussini, a postdoctoral associate in microbiology and molecular genetics, is coauthor of an articled titled "Toxoplasma gondii Cathepsin L Is the Primary Target of the Invasion-inhibitory Compound Morpholinurea-leucyl-homophenyl-vinyl Sulfone Phenyl" in the September 25 issue of The Journal of Biological Chemistry.

Awards and Honors

Elizabeth "Betsy" Greene, associate professor of animal science, was recently honored with two awards from "eXtension", a program within the National Cooperative Extension Service. The Community of Practice Individual Achievement Award was received in recognition of her service as vice-chair and chair of the group and her roles as contributor, mentor and collaborator. The second honor, 2009 Outstanding Community of Practice Award, was presented for her team's (HorseQuest) efforts in innovation and leadership in their area of expertise. They mentored others and created online information (www.extension.org/horses) for the new and experienced members of the national equine industry.

November 11, 2009

Publications and Presentations

Saleem Ali, associate professor of environmental studies, is helping to organize the "Greening Borders: Cooperation, Security and Diplomacy" conference, Nov. 18-19, at the Joan B. Kroc School of Peace Studies, University of San Diego.

Robert Althoff, assistant professor of psychiatry and pediatrics, delivered the 2009 Richard Todd Award Lecture at the 17th World Congress on Psychiatric Genetics in San Diego, Calif. on Nov. 6. The lecture was titled "Whole Genome Methylation Study of 48 Monozytgotic Pairs Concordant or Discordant for Attention Problems."

The Oct. 28 issue of the Journal of the American Medical Association included a two-page medical news piece on the American Heart Association's recent statement recommending a upper daily limit on added dietary sugar. Rachel Johnson, associate provost and professor of nutrition, was lead author of the statement.

Kathleen Manning, professor of integrated professional studies, received the Sister Elizabeth Candon Award from Vermont Women in Higher Education (VWHE) at the 2009 annual fall conference held Oct. 30 at Lake Morey Inn, Fairlee, Vt.

November 4, 2009

Publications and Presentations

Kevin McKenna, professor of Russian, published "Proverbs in Sergei Eisenstein's Aleksandr Nevsky" in the journal Proverbium. The article examines the functional and thematic roles of proverbs in Eisenstein's anti-German propaganda film constructed around the historical figure of Aleksandr Nevsky. McKenna argues that Eisenstein's employment of an unusually large number of proverbs reflects his desire to enhance the film's message of patriotism and nationalism.

Professor Wolfgang Mieder from the Department of German and Russian is the author of 'Geben Sie Zitatenfreiheit!' Friedrich Schillers gestutzte Wort in Literatur, Medien und Karikaturen. The book provides extensive documentation of the ever increasing presence of Friedrich Schiller — whose two hundred fiftieth birthday falls on Nov. 10, 2009 — in contemporary literature and culture. Quotations from many of Schiller's plays have been used in literary works, editorials, advertisements, and comics since the 19th century either in their original form or as caricatures. Wolfgang Mieder has also edited the 26th volume of Proverbium: Yearbook of International Proverb Scholarship to which he contributed the article "New Proverbs Run Deep: Prolegomena to a Dictionary of Modern Anglo American Proverbs." In addition, Wolfgang Mieder edited Otto von Reinsberg-Düringsfeld's Die Frau im Sprichwort. This collection of proverbs which originally was published in 1862 focuses specifically on women. Mieder provides an introduction and extensive bibliography for the edition. Together with David Scrase, professor emeritus, Department of German and Russian, Wolfgang Mieder edited Reactions to the Third Reich Then and Now, the fourth collection of the Harry H. Kahn Memorial Lectures (2005-2009). This volume focuses on local Holocaust scholars and contains lectures by UVM faculty Frank Nicosia, David Scrase, Helga Schreckenberger, and Mark Stoler, and Burlington lawyer and legal scholar Robert Rachlin.

Awards and Honors

Alison Brody, professor of biology, received the 2009 Jackie M. Gribbons Leadership Award from the Vermont Women in Higher Education on Oct. 30. The award is given for a person who has demonstrated leadership ability and effectiveness; served as a model and mentor for aspiring professionals; developed innovative programs/activities in higher education; contributed significantly to her institution and/or profession. Brody was praised for her exceptional mentoring; innovative curriculum reform; generous service to UVM and her profession; and leadership in the Biology Department. Also discussed as evidence of her accomplishments were her active research program in Colorado and Kenya and teaching awards.

An article co-authored by Kathleen Liang, titled "Entrepreneurial Characteristics, Optimism, Pessimism, and Realism - Correlation or Collision?", won the 2009 Outstanding Paper Award in the 2009 Association for Small Business and Entrepreneurship Conference. This marks the fourth time Liang and co-author Paul Dunn have won the Outstanding Paper Award in the history of the association. Previous years included 2008, 2007 and 2002. Liang was also named president of the association for 2009-2010.

October 28, 2009

Publications and Presentations

Michael Ghebreab and Lyndelle LeBruin each gave presentations about their research at the National Organization of Black Chemists and Chemical Engineers Northeast Regional Meeting in Boston, MA, October 23-24.

Rory Waterman, assistant professor of chemistry, completed a lecture tour in October at the Universities of Lethbridge, Calgary, and Alberta, speaking on discoveries relating to new bond-forming catalysis in his laboratories.

David Jones, assistant professor in the School of Business Administration, and his co-author Martin Martens of Concordia University, published a paper in the most recent issue of the Journal of Organizational Behavior. In their paper, titled "The mediating role of overall fairness and the moderating role of trust certainty in justice-criteria relationships: The formation and use of fairness heuristics in the workplace," they present the results from three studies. Using a sample of 1,340 members of a blue-collar union and a sample of 881 professionals from an international transportation company, the researchers found considerable support for theory about how employees combine different types of information to form perceptions about the overall fairness of a company's senior leadership team. They also found support for hypotheses specifying the processes through which employees respond to their fairness perceptions (e.g., commitment and loyalty to the company).

In addition to giving numerous talks in the U.S. and abroad, including a workshop for farmers in Venezuela, Fred Magdoff emeritus professor in Plant & Soil Science, has co-written or edited three books and one magazine special issue published this year all through Monthly Review Press. He co-authored "The Great Financial Crises: Causes and Consequences" with John Bellamy Foster that took a broader approach to the recent financial crisis by presenting a "rigorous and sorely needed historical and forward-looking perspective of the capitalist system out of control," according to Nomi Prins, author of "Other People's Money" and "Jacked." Magdoff co-edited a magazine article titled "The Crises in Agriculture & Food: Conflicts, Resistance, & Renewal" with Brian Tokar in the July/August issue of Monthly Review. He also joined forces with Michael Yates to co-author the book The ABCs of the Economic Crisis: What Working People Need to Know that tells the story of how rich, powerful, highly-educated people created the economic crisis of 2008-09, while hundreds of millions of working people suffered the consequences of lost homes, lost jobs, rising insecurity, and falling living standards. Magdoff also co-authored the book Building Soils for Better Crops (3rd Edition) with Harold van Es. The book is being hailed as one of the most practical guides on soil management available.

Awards and Honors

David Aronsson, professor of orthopaedics and rehabilitation, received the 2009 Distinguished Service Award from the American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP) Section on Orthopaedics (SOOr) during the Academy's national conference in Washington, D.C. in October. The award was established by the SOOr in 1995 to recognize an individual in the field of pediatric orthopaedics who has contributed to the AAP's mission of excellence in patient care, research and teaching. Specifically, Aronsson was recognized for his tireless dedication and commitment to caring for the well being of children afflicted with musculoskeletal diseases and disorders.

Sarah Corey, a graduate student in the Neuroscience Graduate Program, has been awarded a pre-doctoral fellowship from the National Center for Complementary and Alternative Medicine at the NIH for her work with Drs. Helene Langevin and Margaret Vizzard in neurology. Her work explores the mechanism of body-based treatment for chronic musculoskeletal pain. She will use the $84,352, two-year award to continue her study on the innervation of the connective tissues of the low back and how these tissues are altered with injury and inflammation. To gain a better understanding of chronic low back pain this project will involve the development of a connective tissue inflammation model in a rodent. This model will be used to measure the inflammatory response of these connective tissues to the application of body-based treatments (yoga, massage).

October 21, 2009

Awards and Honors

Issei Shimada, a graduate student in anatomy and neurobiology, received a travel award to attend the annual Society for Neuroscience (SfN) meeting in Chicago. Supported by Eli Lilly & Co., the SfN Graduate Student Travel Award honors outstanding students nominated by their local SfN chapter. Awardees are chosen based on the scientific merit of the abstract, evidence of outreach activities, and letters of nomination from the principal investigator or mentor and the local nominating chapter. Issei will be presenting his work titled "Radial glial-like cells control immune cell invasion into the penumbra and reduce stroke injury."

October 14, 2009

Publications and Presentations

David A. Shiman, professor of education and director of the Center for World Education, had an article titled "Human Rights Education in Costa Rica: More Expectation than Implementation" in the June, 2009 issue of the Inter-American Journal of Education for Democracy.

Awards and Honors

Declan Connolly, professor in the department of education, received a service award from the American Alliance for Health, Physical Education, Recreation and Dance (AAHPERD) research consortium for service as section editor for Research Quarterly in Exercise & Sport from September 2005 to August 2009. He also gave a keynote address at the True Symposium at the Maine Medical Center & American Academy of Family Practice in September titled "Staying Active until your 401K Recovers." Connolly also gave keynote addresses over the summer at the Nike Invitational Running Camps in Lyndon, Vt., on "Rest, Recovery & Nutrition for Distance Runners" and at the Irish Professional Sports Science Annual Meeting in Dublin, Ireland on "Treatment of Delayed Onset Muscle Soreness."

October 7, 2009

Publications and Presentations

Mary Cushman, professor of medicine, is lead author of a paper titled "Implications of increased C-reactive protein for cardiovascular risk stratification in black and white men and women in the US" in the September Clinical Chemistry. Nancy Jenny, research assistant professor of pathology, was a co-author on the paper.

Rachael Hannah, a graduate student in anatomy and neurobiology, has been awarded a travel award from the Committee on Women in Neuroscience to attend the annual Society for Neuroscience meeting in Chicago. Awardees (men and women) are chosen on the basis of the scientific merit of their abstracts, a letter of nomination from a principal investigator or adviser, research and career goals, and an essay. She will be presenting her work, titled "Regulation of brain parenchymal arteriolar diameter by the vascular endothelium: Roles of calcium-sensitive potassium channels," with University Distinguished Professor and Chair of Pharmacology Mark Nelson. Research Assistant Professor of Pharmacology Adrian Bonev is a co-author on the abstract. Hannah is also presenting an additional abstract at the same meeting titled, "Neuroscience Outreach in Vermont: Creating sustainable resources for Vermont classrooms." Co-authors on that abstract include Neuroscience Graduate Program students Jill Hoffman, Sarah Corey, Kim Moore, Vanessa Ochoa, Simone Otto, as well as Brigitte Lavoie, postdoctoral associate in anatomy and neurobiology, Abby Dattilio, technician in neurology, Emily McLaughlin, neuroscience graduate program assistant, and Rae Nishi, director of the neuroscience graduate program and professor of anatomy and neurobiology.

Betty Rambur, professor of nursing, presented as a panelist on "Addressing Primary Care Workforce Challenges" at the Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality 2009 Annual Conference in Bethesda, Md., on Sept. 14.

Awards and Honors

Robert Hondal, associate professor of biochemistry, received a 2009 Journal of Peptide Science Best Publication Award for his paper titled "Studies on deprotection of cysteine and selenocysteine side-chain protecting groups." This award honors the best paper published in the Journal of Peptide Science. The winner is chosen every year from all research articles published in Journal of Peptide Science in the two previous years. Stevenson Flemer, Jr., research associate in biochemistry, was a co-author on the paper.

The Cystic Fibrosis Center at the The Children's Specialty Center at Fletcher Allen Health Care and the University of Vermont has been selected as one of the 2009 recipients of the annual Cystic Fibrosis Foundation's Quality Care Award, titled "Recognizing Outstanding QI Processes and Accomplishments." Instituted in 2008, this award recognizes Center's that demonstrate sustained quality improvement work that improved outcomes. Thomas Lahiri, associate professor of pediatrics and director of the Cystic Fibrosis Center, will receive the award at the annual U.S. Center and Program Directors' meeting held in conjunction with the Cystic Fibrosis Foundation North American Cystic Fibrosis Conference in Minneapolis, Minnesota on October 17.

September 30, 2009

Publications and Presentations

Saleem Ali, associate professor of environmental planning at the Rubenstein School of Environment and Natural Resources, has a new book coming out titled "Treasures of the Earth: Need, Greed, and a Sustainable Future (Yale University Press)." The book deals with equity and ethical dimensions of production and consumption across the planet and hows how treasures of the earth should be utilized equitably would help in framing appropriate policies for the future. In his preface, Ali askes the question: "Would the world be a better place if human societies were somehow able to curb their desires for material goods? Such a simple question prompted the writing for this book."

Walter F. Kuentzel, associate professor in the Rubenstein School of Environment and Natural Resources, had a book published through the Public Policy Institute, Trinity College Dublin, titled "Comparing Rural development Strategies in Four Irish Communities, 1930-2005." In the book, Kuentzel, whose research focuses on rural change, rural tourism development, and natural resource management, explores rural change as a process of adaptation. He tells a story of how rural Irish communities have been able to adapt to to the pressures of the nation-building, to the pressures of modernization and the pressures of globalization which are carving out new options and new identities for Irish rural places.

Awards and Honors

Lydia and Elise Corriveau, nursing majors from Underhill, Briana Martin, a social work major from the Bronx, and Jessica Serrante, an environmental studies major from Bridgewater, NJ, were awarded $500 Jeffrey Brace Book Award scholarships for 2009-2010 by United Academics (AAUP/AFT). The scholarships, named in honor of an early 19th-century Black Vermonter named Jeffrey Brace, are to be used for books and supplies by students who exemplify not only academic excellence, but also an active commitment to achieving social justice.

The Vermont Academy of Science and Engineering (VASE) held its annual meeting on September 22nd. William Geiger, professor of chemistry, and Gary Ward, professor in the department of microbiology and molecular genetics, were inducted into the Vermont Academy of Science and Engineering at the VASE annual meeting. Emeritus Professor of chemistry Christopher Allen started a two year term as VASE president.

September 23, 2009

Publications and Presentations

Professors from the Political Science Department made a variety of presentations at the 2009 American Political Science Association Convention in Toronto, Sept. 3-6. Among them were Caroline Beer, on "Women's Participation in Mexican State Legislatures," Alec Ewald, "Why do States Adopt Collateral Sanctions Laws?," Lisa Holmes, on "The Public Treatment of Judicial Nominees," and Peter VonDoepp, on "The Leadership Variable in Africa: Situating Structure and Agency in Governance Trajectories." Panel participants included Ellen Ann Andersen, "Comparative State Reactions to LGBT Rights Claims," John Burke, "Reflections on Presidential Transitions: The Role of Political Science and Public Administration," and Gregory Gause, "The Nuclear Proliferation Challenge in the Middle East: Causes and Consequences." Andersen chaired a section on sexuality and politics, the panel, "Just How Different? Sexual Politics in Canada and the United States," and was elected section president for the 2010 conference. Ewald and Garrison Nelson were selected as Pi Sigma Alpha Campus Teaching Award recipients.

A book review by Robert Costanza, director of the Gund Institute, was published in the September issue of Nature. Costanza reviewed David Orr's book, Down to the Wire: Confronting Climate Collapse

Regina Toolin, assistant professor of education, co-authored a refereed article titled, "Conducting sustainable energy projects in secondary science classrooms," that will appear in the journal Science Activities. Toolin and graduate student John Downes are scheduled to give a presentation titled, "GEAR-UP and Close the Gap: Partnering with Middle Grade Students for Post-secondary Access and Success," at the Annual Meeting of the National Association for Multicultural Education in October of 2009.

Awards and Honors

Regina Toolin, assistant professor of education, Lesley-Ann Dupigny-Giroux, associate professor of geography, and Rory Waterman, assistant professor in chemistry, were awarded a $900,000 grant from the National Science Foundation: Robert Noyce Scholarship Program and a $75,000 grant from the Vermont Department of Education's Math and Science Partnership Program (MSP).

Barri Tinkler, assistant professor in education, received an award as the Outstanding Reviewer for the American Educational Research Journal's Section on Social and Institutional Analysis.

September 16, 2009

Publications and Presentations

Christopher Allen, emeritus professor of chemistry, attended the 12th international Symposium on Inorganic Ring Systems in Goa, India Aug. 16-21. He presented a paper titled, "Vinyl Borazines and their Polymers" and continues to serve on the International Advisory Board for the Symposium. Allen also co-authored a paper titled, "Stereodirective Effects in Mixed Substituent Vinyloxycyclotriphosphazenes," published in Inorganic Chemistry, Volume 48, 7576 (2009).

David Jones, assistant professor in the School of Business Administration, had an article published in the Journal of Business Ethics. Jones assessed change in UVM students' levels of moral reasoning following five 75-minute classes on business ethics and two assignments utilizing a novel pedagogical approach designed to foster ethical reasoning skills. Results showed that, controlling for pretraining levels of moral reasoning, students in the training group demonstrated higher levels of post-training principled moral judgment than students in the control group.

Jane Kolodinsky, professor and chair of the Department of Community Development and Applied Economics, and CDAE graduate students recently had two articles published related to the food system and obesity. Kolodinsky, Travis Reynolds , Mark Cannella , David Timmons, and Daniel Bromberg co-authored "U.S. Consumer Demand for Restaurant Calorie Information: Targeting Demographic and Behavioral Segments in Labeling Initiatives" that appeared in the Sept/Oct 2009 issue of the American Journal of Health Promotion. Kolodinsky and Reynolds published "Social Marketing and Segmentation of Overweight Americans" in the March 8 issue of the International Journal of Behavioral Nutrition and Physical Activity.

Robert Nash, professor of integrated professional studies, co-authored Helping College Students Find Purpose: The Campus Guide To Meaning-Making (Jossey-Bass/Wiley, 2009). Nash and Penny A. Bishop, associate professor in education, co-wrote Teaching Adolescents Religious Literacy in a Post-9/11 World (Information Age Publications, 2009).

An article by Susan Ryan, professor and director of the Center on Disability and Community Integrated Professional Studies, "Left behind: Lack of research-based interventions for children and youth with fetal alcohol spectrum disorders" was published in Rural Special Education Quarterly. She also co-authored "Inclusion for students with fetal alcohol syndrome: Classroom teachers talk about practice" in the March 22 issue of Preventing School Failure."

September 9, 2009

Publications and Presentations

Rodger Kessler, research assistant professor of family medicine, was featured in an article titled "New Subnetwork Seeks Evidence to Support Collaborative Care" in the August 5 issue of the American Academy of Family Physician publication aafp NEWS NOW.

Richard Pratley, professor of medicine, delivered a presentation titled "The Pharmacology of GLP-1 Signaling: GLP-1 Agonists and DPP-4 Inhibitors" and a poster session titled "Once-daily human GLP-1 analog liraglutide improves plasma lipids and metabolic syndrome in type 2 diabetes: a meta-analysis of 6 clinical trials" at "ENDO 09," the Endocrine Society's annual meeting in Washington D.C. in June.

Several faculty presented at the July 2009 International Society on Thrombosis and Haemostasis 22nd Congress, "ISTH 2009," in Boston July. Paula Tracy, professor and interim chair of biochemistry, was co-chair of the Scientific Program Committee (basic science) for the meeting. Mary Cushman, professor of medicine, was chair of the Sol Sherry Memorial Lecture. Edwin Bovill, professor and chair of pathology provided introductory comments for the Presidential Plenary Session. Among the presenters from UVM were Maria Ramos-Nino, research assistant professor of medicine; Benjamin Littenberg, professor of medicine; Kathleen Brummel-Ziedins, research associate professor of biochemistry; Kenneth Mann, professor of biochemistry; Chris Holmes, assistant professor of medicine; Nadia Bambace, clinical instructor in medicine; Salius Butenas, research associate professor of biochemistry; Matthew Gissel, research specialist in biochemistry; Thomas Orfeo, research associate in biochemistry; Nancy Jenny, research assistant professor of pathology; Neil Zakai, assistant professor of medicine; Beth Bouchard, research assistant professor of biochemistry; among others.

Awards and Honors

Issei Shimada, a graduate student in anatomy and neurobiology, has been awarded a Pre-doctoral Fellowship from the Founders Affiliate of the American Heart Association for his work with assistant professor of medicine Jeff Spees exploring mechanisms to protect the brain following stroke. He will use the two-year, $42,000 award to continue his studies of stroke, focusing on cells named "reactive astrocytes." In preliminary studies, Shimada and Spees identified a subpopulation of reactive astrocytes that are likely to play a key role in the protection of neurons from ischemic damage after stroke. The proposed research will use pharmacological tools and transgenic mouse models to better define signal transduction pathways that regulate the appearance the specialized cells in the peri-infarct area and that control their protective abilities.

September 2, 2009

Publications and Presentations

Bryan Dague of the Center on Disability and Community Inclusion, was the closing plenary speaker at the National Conference of Executives of the The Arc Summer Leadership Institute on Aug. 9 in Nashville, Tenn. His presentation, "A Time for Change: Vermont's Conversion from Sheltered Workshops to Community Employment for All," focused on the daunting task of converting sheltered workshops to community-based employment. Dague explained how Vermont became the first state to eliminate sheltered workshops and discussed the timeline, actions taken, and barriers experienced along their journey to full community employment as a supported service for all. He plans to give a similar the presentation on Nov. 11 at the The Arc National Convention in Pittsburgh.

Anne Geroski, associate professor in integrated professional studies, published a CourseSmart eTextbook with Pearson titled, Groups in Schools: Preparing, Leading, and Responding.

Kathleen Liang , associate professor in the Department of Community Development and Applied Economics, was selected for the 2010 Edition of Who's Who in America, which has chronicled the lives and careers of America's most noteworthy people since 1899. Liang recently published a new book to demonstrate how to engage students in entrepreneurial activities on campus. The book, titled Dollar Enterprise - From Theory to Reality - An Experiential Learning Exercise Applying Community Entrepreneurship to Plan and Operate a Small Venture on Campus (Kendall Hunt Publishing company) is one of the first books to describe procedures of entrepreneurship and new venture creation in a campus environment.

Lance C. Smith, an instructor in integrated professional studies, had an article titled, "The anxiety of affirming heterosexuals when negotiating heteronormativity" accepted for publication by the peer reviewed journal Human Services Education.

Rory Waterman, assistant professor of chemistry, gave an invited lecture at the 2009 Organometallic Gordon Conference in Newport, R.I., on July 14. His talk titled, "Zirconium-Mediated Bond Formation: Stripping off Hydrogen to Make sigma- and pi-Bonds," was given to an audience of organometallic chemists from around the world. A research paper by graduate student Michael Ghebreab and Waterman has been accepted for publication in the journal Polyhedron. The paper, titled "Triamidoamine-Supported Zirconium Complexes in the Catalytic Dehydrocoupling of 1,2-Bisphosphinobenzene and Ethane" describes some of their recent advances in bond-forming catalysis. The paper was submitted by Waterman as a contribution to Polyhedron's "The Next Generation" special issue highlighting inorganic chemists under 40 years of age from around the world.

Awards and Honors

Shirley J. Gedeon, associate professor of economics, has been awarded an Individual  Advanced Research Opportunities (IARO) grant from the International Research and Exchanges Board to pursue research in Bosnia, Croatia, and Montenegro on the role that financial markets and institutions play in shaping economic outcomes in Bosnia and Herzegovina under the currency board regime. Sponsored by the U.S. Department of State's Title VIII Program, the IARO program seeks to attract, select and support in-depth field research by U.S. scholars and experts in policy-relevant subject areas related to Eastern Europe and Eurasia, as well as to disseminate knowledge about these regions to a wide network of constituents in the United States and abroad.

August 26, 2009

Publications and Presentations

Jason H. T. Bates, professor of medicine and a Vermont Lung Center scientist, is author of a new textbook published by Cambridge University Press, titled Lung Mechanics: An Inverse Modeling Approach. Bates specializes in the mechanics that make lungs work and developing instruments that mimic and measure that function in the lab.

Ethan Guth, a postdoctoral fellow in biochemistry, is first author of a study titled "Asymmetric Amino Acid Activation by Class II Histidyl-tRNA Synthetase from Escherichia coli" in the July 31 issue of The Journal of Biological Chemistry. Christopher S. Francklyn, professor of biochemistry, is senior author on the paper, and Matthew Bovee, professor of management information systems in the School of Business, is a co-author.

Ted James, assistant professor of surgery, was elected to a partial term ending in 2011 as a member of the board of directors of the American Cancer Society's New England Division. James, a member of the Vermont Cancer Center, is active in research, including exploring novel therapies for the treatment of breast cancer. He serves as chairman of the Fletcher Allen Health Care Cancer Committee, Cancer Liaison Physician to the American College of Surgeon's Commission on Cancer.

Awards and Honors

David Jones, assistant professor in the School of Business Administration, and his colleagues (Dr. Chelsea Willness at Brock University and Shannon MacNeil at the University of Calgary) were recently honored at the annual meeting of the Academy of Management in Chicago. Their paper, "Corporate social responsibility and recruitment: Person-organization fit and signaling mechanisms," was selected from among 291 submissions as the best conference paper in the Human Resources division. In their study they tested reasons why some job seekers are attracted to companies that are known for corporate social responsibility (CSR). They found that some individuals want to work in companies that engage in CSR because it represents a good fit between their own values and those of the company (e.g., people who cared more about helping others were particularly attracted to a company that gave back to its community and encouraged its employees to volunteer). They also found that job seekers tend to be attracted by CSR because it provides them with signals about expected working conditions (e.g., "if the company cares so much about people in the community then they probably treat their own people really well").

August 14, 2009

Publications and Presentations

Robert V. Bartlett, Gund Professor of Liberal Arts in the Political Science Department, is the co-author (with Walter F. Baber) of a new book published by The MIT Press, Global Democracy and Sustainable Jurisprudence: Deliberative Environmental Law. Arguing that environmental protection is ultimately dependent on the democratization of global politics and policy, the book proposes a philosophical foundation and realistic deliberative mechanism for creating a transnational common law for the environment. Baber and Bartlett are authors of a previous book published by The MIT Press, Deliberative Environmental Politics: Democracy and Ecological Rationality (2005).

Matthew Bovee, professor of management information systems in the School of Business, recently had his paper on accounting information usefulness models accepted by peer review for presentation at the 2009 Americas Conference on Information Systems in San Francisco. The paper, titled "Decision-Useful Financial Reporting Information Characteristics: An Empirical Validation of the Proposed FASB/IASB International Accounting Model," was also selected as "Best-In-Track" and one of 33 papers entered into the competition for "Best-In-Conference." The "Best-In-Track" papers represented the top 5 percent of more than 660 peer-reviewed papers at the conference.

Alan Wertheimer, professor emeritus of political science and senior research scholar in the Department of Bioethics, Clinical Center, at the National Institutes of Health, was co-author of an article, "The Obligation to Participate in Biomedical Research," that appeared in the July 1 issue of The Journal of the American Medical Association. In the article, Wertheimer and his co-authors, G. Owen Shaefer and Ezekiel J. Emmanuel, argue that there is a obligation for patients to participate in biomedical research for the public good.

July 29, 2009

Publications and Presentations

A research paper proposal by Dorian McCoy, assistant professor of higher education and student affairs, titled, "A Phenomenological Exploration of First-Generation Students of Color Experiences," was accepted for the 2009 Association for the Study of Higher Education Conference in Vancouver, British Columbia, Nov. 4-7.

Susan Ryan, executive director of the Vermont University Center on Excellence in Developmental Disabilities, will present a workshop on early intervention social emotional competence at Trinity College, Dublin July 27-30. This is a return trip for Ryan; she lived in Ireland from 2004-2005, researching fetal alcohol spectrum disorders under a Fulbright Research Scholars Award.

Awards and Honors

The Association for the Advancement of Medical Instrumentation Foundation presented the 2009 Robert L. Morris Humanitarian Award to J. Tobey Clark, director of Instrumentation and Technical Services at UVM. The award recognizes individuals whose humanitarian or education efforts have applied health technology to improving global human conditions. "Tobey epitomizes the spirit of this award in many ways," a spokesperson for the foundation said. "With over thirty years of dedicated experience and providing leadership in organizations supporting the global clinical engineering field as well as through developing courses, teaching and publishing articles, Tobey works diligently to improve the safe use of medical technology around the globe."

Fayneese Miller, dean of the College of Education and Social Services, presented Sen. Sheldon Whitehouse of R.I. with the first annual National Truancy Prevention Association (NTPA) HOPE award for his work and commitment to truancy and dropout prevention issues. Miller, whose research has made national impact on truancy policy and prevention, serves as a member of the board of directors for the NTPA.

Student Glory O'Neil finished ahead of nearly 500 other Army ROTC cadets in the Army Physical Fitness Test (APFT) held as part of cadet training in Fort Lewis, Wash. Passing the test is a prerequisite for becoming commissioned as a U.S. Army lieutenant. O'Neil scored 373 points on an extended scale; 300 is the Army's standard maximum score. Her achievement on the APFT placed her in the top two percent of her 500-person regiment. The test, which measures the student's strength and endurance, consists of sit-ups and push-ups, each timed over two minutes, and a two-mile run.

June 24, 2009

Publications and Presentations

Penny Bishop, associate professor and director of Middle Level Teacher Education, delivered and invited lecture, "Middle Years Teacher Credentialing in Aotearoa/New Zealand," at the New Zealand Embassy in Wasthington, D.C. on June 5.

Frank Bryan, the John G. McCullough Professor of Political Science, was invited to deliver a paper before the 5th Annual Montreal Citizen Summit at the University of Quebec at Montreal on June 7 titled: "Real Democracy in Cities: Lessons from the New England Town Meeting."

The Vermont Business Center has announced that Greg Dana, project director in The Office of Health Promotion Research, successfully completed The Professional Certificate In Leadership and Management. The program, run by UVM, is unique in that it focuses on key concepts, vocabulary and analytical tools essential for effective management and strategic decision making. Dana successfully completed courses in Strategic Human Resources, Organizational Performance, Business Finance, Accounting, Negotiations Strategies, Strategic Marketing, Financial Analysis, Increasing Sales, Marketing, Gaining Competitive Advantage, and Business Coaching

Ted Flanagan, professor emeritus of chemistry, recently published the following two articles in the Journal of Physical Chemistry: "Hydrogen Solubility in Pd/chromia Composites Prepared by Internal Oxidation of Pd-Cr Alloys. Equilibrium Pressure-Composition Data", with D. Wang, Gauthoma and R. Balasubramaniam (IIT Kanpur India) and "Hydrogen Solubility in Pd/chromia Composites Prepared by Internal Oxidation of Pd-Cr Alloys. Calorimetric Determination of Enthalpies", with S. Luo.

Sean Hurley, assistant professor of education, recently co-authored the following articles and book chapter: "Solving Problems Using Matrix, Network, and Hierarchy Diagrams: The Consequences of Violating Construction Conventions" in the Quarterly Journal of Experimental Psychology; "Design Sensitivity: Statistical Power for Applied Experimental Research" in The SAGE Handbook of Applied Social Research Methods; and "Disentangling Ethnic and Contextual Influences Among Parents Raising Youth in High-Risk Communities" in Applied Developmental Science.

Dorian McCoy, assistant professor of higher education and student affairs, co-authored a chapter on social organizations in the oral history project-based book, Old South Baton Rouge: The Roots of Hope.

Wolfgang Mieder, professor of German and Russian, is the author of "NIeman hât ân arebeit wîstuom". Sprichwörtliches in mittelhochdeutschen Epen, a study of the use proverbs in the major German mediaeval epics. In addition to identifying proverbial expressions and explaining their origin and history of usage, Mieder analyses their specific function in each work. They are used as commentaries, to characterize protagonists, or to express the main idea of the work. The book also contains a detailed review of the thirteen-volume Thesarus proverbiorum medii aevi. Mieder also published "Yes We Can". Barack Obama's Proverbial Rhetoric. In this book, Mieder shows Barack Obama's rich knowledge and appreciation of proverbs and proverbial expressions in his two books Dreams from My Father (1995) and Audacity of Hope (2006) as well as in his campaign speeches, news conferences, radio addresses, and interviews. In addition to detailed analyses of Obama's proverbial rhetoric within the context of the respective works and speeches, the book contains a comprehensive contextualized index of 1714 proverbial expressions found in Obama's writings and speeches.

Ken Nalibow, associate professor of German and Russian, has published the article "The USSR and LGBT Intolerance" in the essay volume The Queer Community. Continuing the Struggle for Social Justice. The article chronicles Nalibow's experiences of hostility and violence in the Soviet Union during the eighties where homosexuality is a criminal offense carrying a prison sentence.

Helga Schreckenberger, professor and chair of German and Russian, published "Literarische Reaktionen zur ostjüdischen Zuwanderung nach 1918," in the essay volume Österreich 1918 und die Folgen. The article provides an examination of the literary representation of East European Jewish emigrants in post World War I Austrian literature. It shows that the figure of the Eastern European Jew is used to expose the alienated and ambivalent existence of the assimilated Western Jew. Schreckenberger also published "Aimless Travels: Deromanticizing Exile in Irgmard Keun's Kind aller Länder" (1938) which appeared in Exiles Traveling. Exploring Displacement, Crossing Boundaries in German Exile Arts and Writings 1933-1945. Schreckenberger argues that by focusing on the constitutive aspects of traveling, like class privilege, means of conveyance, agents, frontiers, documents and gender, Keun exposes the differences between the privileged, voluntary travel of tourists and the forced wanderings of refugees.

Awards and Honors

Lee Corbett, a graduate student in geology, has been awarded a National Science Foundation Graduate Research Fellowship for her work exploring the geological past of the Greenland Ice Sheet. Working with professor Paul Bierman, she will use the prestigious $30,000 grant to continue her study of the age of rocks found in and at the margin of the ice sheet. Using a technique called cosmogenic nuclide dating, Corbett is helping to create a portrait of times when the ice sheet was smaller than today. This research is of pressing relevance in understanding the current impact of climate change on Greenland's ice — and its effect on sea level.

May 20, 2009

Publications and Presentations

Sylvie Doublié, associate professor of microbiology and molecular genetics, and Susan Wallace, professor and chair of microbiology and molecular genetics are co-lead authors of a study in the May Structure titled, "Crystal structures of two archaeal 8-oxoguanine DNA glycosylases of the Ogg2 family provide structural insight into guanine/8-oxoguanine distinction."

May 13, 2009

Publications and Presentations

Jennifer Jewiss, research assistant professor of education, has been re-elected as co-chair of theQualitative Methods Topical Interest Group of the American Evaluation Association. Jewiss co-presented at that organization's annual conference; the title of the peer-reviewed presentation was, "National Heritage Areas: Building a Cyclic Program Theory Model from Qualitative Data and Practitioner Knowledge." She is also a co-editor of a book under contract with Jossey-Bass, Qualitative Inquiry in the Practice of Evaluation.

Cheryl Mitchell, lecturer of education, was invited to give the keynote address at the 6th annual Forum on Civic Engagement at Middlebury College on April 7. The address was titled, "Varieties of Civic Engagement." Mitchell also gave a talk at the National Assembly in Korea on March 4 on "Reducing Stigma and Increasing Support for Unwed Mothers: reflections on Practice in Vermont and the US."

Awards and Honors

Senior nursing student Colleen McColgan was the winner of the Community University Partnerships and Service-Learning Office 2009 Service Learning Photo Contest. Her photo, taken in Manikganj, Bangladesh during her Community/Public Health Nursing course, features two children that lived in one of the villages her group was working in and her group's guide/interpreter Selma, who was a student at the Independent University of Bangladesh.

May 6, 2009

Publications and Presentations

A book review by Robert Costanza, director of the Gund Institute, appeared in Nature on April 30. Costanza weighs in on Nicholas Stern's book, A Blueprint for a Safer Planet: How to Manage Climate Change and Create a New Era of Progress and Prosperity. Read the article.

Richard Johnson III, assistant professor of education, is editor of the recently released book, The Queer Community: Continuing the Struggle for Social Justice.

David Jones, assistant professor in the School of Business Administration, had an article published in the May issue of the Journal of Organizational Behavior, titled "Getting even with one's supervisor and one's organization: Relationships among types of injustice, desires for revenge, and counterproductive work behaviors." In this study, Jones showed that different types of perceptions of unfairness in the workplace are associated with counterproductive behaviors (e.g., theft, undermining a supervisor) that tend to be directed toward the source of perceived unfairness, whether that be one's supervisor or the larger organization. Challenging researchers' assumptions that revenge motives underlie the relationships between perceived unfairness and counterproductive work behavior, Jones showed that desires for revenge mediated only some of these relationships, suggesting that other motives are at work (e.g., thrill seeking, equity restoration).

Dorian McCoy, assistant professor of education, gave a research presentation, "The Power of Research - Students of Color and EPWIs," and a paper presentaton, "Employment to Full-Time Graduate Student," at the American College Personnel Association Convention in Washington, D.C.

David Shiman, professor of education, presented a workshop for teachers, "Responding to the Needs of Low-Income Students: Examining One's School" at the Vermont National Education Association conference in Burlington and also presented on education for citizenship to the South Burlington school board.

Awards and Honors

Jerold Lucey, professor of pediatrics and Wallace Professor of Neonatology, received the 2009 American Pediatric Society (APS) Howland Medal Award at the Pediatric Academic Societies Annual Meeting in Baltimore and was honored at a special APS Members' Dinner on May 4. The John Howland Medal, the APS's highest award, has been given since 1952 to honor those who, by their contribution to pediatrics, have aided in its advancement.

April 29, 2009

Publications and Presentations

Cambridge University Press recently published a collection of original essays co-edited by Alec Ewald, assistant professor of political science. In Criminal Disenfranchisement in an International Perspective leading scholars and advocates offer the first international examination of the nature, causes and effects of laws regulating voting by people with criminal convictions — vital questions about democratic self-definition, constitutional values, and, increasingly, the scope of judicial power.

The George Washington Institute for Spirituality and Health highlighted the College of Medicine's Vermont Integrated Curriculum and Robert Macauley, assistant professor of pediatrics, in its winter 2009 newsletter in an article titled "Spirituality . . . New England Style." Macauley, who also serves as clinical director of ethics at Fletcher Allen, teaches a class in the Generations course titled "Spirituality in Childhood."

Awards and Honors

Anurag Shukla, a junior double-major in microbiology and molecular genetics, won received third place prize with a cash award of $200 for a presentation titled "Analyzing the Histological Patterns of Breast Cancer Stem Cells in a Xenograft Model Targeted with Phage Displayed Antibodies" at the 4th Annual AACR Undergraduate Student Caucus and Poster Competition, held on April 18, 2009, during the 100th Annual Meeting of American Association of Cancer Research at Denver, Colorado.

April 22, 2009

Awards and Honors

Mark Nelson, professor and chair of pharmacology, was awarded the honor of Fellow in the Biophysical Society. This award is designed to honor the Society's distinguished members who have demonstrated excellence in science and to the expansion of the field of biophysics.

April 15, 2009

Publications and Presentations

Cathy Beaudoin, assistant professor, and her co-authors, Drs. Christopher Agoglia and George Tsakumis (University of Massachusetts and Drexel University, respectively) had an article published in the most recent issue Behavioral Research in Accounting. The authors showed that when engaged in a financial statement audit, preparers using a component documentation structure provided more favorable (and lower quality) assessments of control weaknesses than those preparers using either a supporting or balanced documentation structure. Results also indicate that reviewer task-specific experience moderated the effect of documentation structure. That is, when conducting an audit of financial statements, the task-specific experience of those reviewing audit workpapers may help reduce the previously observed "flow-through" effect of preparer workpaper deficiencies on reviewer judgments. These findings provide support for new regulations emphasizing the role of experience during the control assessment process of the audit.

Chun Zhang, assistant professor in the School of Business, recently had a paper titled "Do buyer cooperative actions matter under relational stress? Evidence from Japanese and U.S. assemblers in the U.S. automotive industry" accepted for publication in the Journal of Operations Management. Using data on 2,012 buying situations collected from Tier-1 suppliers to the three U.S. domestic automotive assemblers (Chrysler, Ford, and General Motors) and three Japanese transplant automotive assemblers (Honda, Nissan, and Toyota) over three consecutive years (2003-2005), Zhang and her co-authors John W. Henke Jr. (Oakland University) and David A. Griffith (Michigan State University) found that the relationship-enhancing effect of buyer assistance increases under high relational stress, while the effectiveness of buyer communication decreases. The effect of supplier involvement is not significantly influenced by relational stress levels. Furthermore, they found that supplier relations with Japanese transplant assemblers are characterized by higher levels of cooperative actions, lower levels of relational stress, and higher levels of supplier willingness to invest in technology when compared to those of U.S. domestic assemblers.

Awards and Honors

Robert Manning, professor of natural resources, was recently named the first ever recipient of the George Wright

Society Social Science Achievement Award, which was created in recognition of the increasing importance of the social sciences to park research, management, and education.

April 8, 2009

Publications and Presentations

Kathleen Liang, associate professor in the Department of Community Development and Applied Economics, will receive the 2009 Outstanding Research Award in the division of Entrepreneurship Education by Allied Academy, one of the largest organizations for entrepreneurship and business disciplines in the world. The award is based on a paper that Liang co-authored an article with Paul Dunn, Distinguished Professor of Entrepreneurship and Small Business at the University of Louisiana in Monroe, titled "Are We On The Same Page On Financial Issues? A Comparison of Entrepreneurship/Small Business and Finance Professors' Reaction."

David Jones, assistant professor in the School of Business Administration, presented three papers at the annual meeting of the Society for Industrial and Organizational Psychology in April in New Orleans. Jones and his co-authors Chelsea Willness (Brock University) and Derek Chapman (University of Calgary) presented a paper titled "Attracting applicants through corporate social responsibility: A real world test" in which they found that the fit between job seekers' self-identities and companies' performance on specific dimensions of corporate social responsibility (CSR) predicted job seeking decisions. Jones also served as an expert panel member on a session about the science and practice of CSR; in this paper, titled "There is nothing more practical than good theory: How firms can (and do) use social exchange and organizational identification theories to inform CSR practice" Jones reviewed his work with Vermont companies to design and manage employee volunteerism programs. Jones also presented findings from a study on how employees respond to their companies' CSR, titled "Feeling proud of the company's community service and environmental initiatives: Relationships with perceived value fit, organizational identification, and other attitudes." Jones also led and facilitated a community of interest session on corporate social responsibility.

George S. Leibowitz, assistant professor in the Department of Social Work, recently had a paper titled "Comparison of juvenile sexual offenders and nonsexual offending delinquents on pornography exposure: the absence of relationships between exposure to pornography and the majority of later sex offense characteristics" in the Journal of Forensic Nursing. Leibowitz, who was also invited to speak in the adolescent track at the annual Association of the Treatment of Sexual Abuse conference in Dallas in the fall of 2009, had another co-authored conference paper on the differences between adult sex offenders and sexual abusive youth accepted by the same journal.

April 1, 2009

Publications and Presentations

A CD titled, "Night Pageantry: Music of Thomas L. Read," featuring Donna Amato and Cynthia Huard (piano); Rachel Elliott and Janet Polk (bassoon); Neil Boyer (oboe); Steven Klimowski (clarinet); and Bonnie Klimowski (cello) will be released in 2009 by Zimbel Records. The release honors the music of Professor Emeritus Thomas L. Read, a composer and violinist.

Rory Waterman, assistant professor of chemistry, and some of his students presented papers at the American Chemical Society National Meeting in Salt Lake City. Senior Jillian Davidson and Waterman presented, "Insertion reactivity of zirconium-arsenic bond." Graduate student Andrew Roering and Waterman presented "Insertion reactivity of zirconium-phosphorus bonds." Matthias Brewer, assistant professor of chemistry, also presented a paper titled Synthetic routes to bicyclic diazenium salts" with graduate students Muhammad Javed and Jodi Wyman at the same meeting.

March 25, 2009

Publications and Presentations

Hendrika Maltby, associate professor of nursing, led a three-week field experience trip in Bangladesh involving nineteen University of Vermont nursing students. The program was sponsored by Independent University, Bangladesh and included visits to Manikganj and Sylhet and presentations on the citizens' health, nature of diseases, barriers to health care services. An article about the group was featured in the Jan, 18, 2009 issue of the Dhaka, Bangladesh daily English newspaper New Age.

At the recent March meeting of American Physical Society in Pittsburgh, the following physics faculty and graduate students gave contributed talks: "Exciton Recombination in Nanometer-Wide GaN/AlN Quantum Wells," Zhenwen Pan, graduate student, and Professor Madalina Furis; "Hydration and phase separation of polyethylene glycol in copolymers of tyrosine derived carbonates" and "Diamond-shaped small-angle scattering and the deformation of fibrous textures," Wenjie Wang, graduate student; "Interfacial Structure imaging of Pentacene/Si(111) by model-independent method," Songtao Wo and Hua Zhou, graduate students, and Professor Randall Headrick.

March 18, 2009

Publications and Presentations

John P. Burke, professor of political science, delivered an address on March 2, on the Obama presidential transition at the sixth annual "Public Affairs Week" at Baruch College-CUNY.

Dennis Clougherty, professor of physics, co-authored a recently published an article in the journal Physical Review Letters. The article, "Polarization and Adiabatic Pumping In Inhomogeneous Crystals," provides a way of calculating the effects of slowly varying fields on the electronic polarization of a crystal. This new theory provides insight into the fundamental nature of a new class of materials known as multiferroics where both electric and magnetic polarization coexist. It also sheds light on the nature of fractionally charged solitons, exotic excitations that can be used for quantum information processing.

Benjamin King, graduate student in community development and applied economics will present the poster, "Farm-to-School Programs Build Social Equity in Vermont" at the National Farm-to-Cafeteria Conference in Portland, Oregon March 19-21, on behalf of himself, Jane Kolodinsky, Erin Roche, and Linda Berlin of UVM, as well as Abbie Nelson and Kim Norris of Vermont FEED.

Lawrence Shelton, associate professor in the human development and family studies program in the College of Education and Social Services, delivered a presentation on "Teaching Parents How to Divorce" at the 17th Annual International Conference on Parent Education and Parenting held at the University of North Texas in February. The presentation featured Shelton's recent sabbatical project and the 17 years of experiences of the instructors in the Vermont Family Court parent education workshop sponsored by UVM Extension.

Asim Zia, assistant professor in community development and applied economics, will present "Implementation Dilemmas of International Climate Policy: Revisiting the Problem of 'Fair' Allocation of Green House Gas Emission Allowances in a Post-Kyoto Governance Regime" as part of the session "Tackling Global Warming" at the 2009 annual meeting for the American Society for Public Administration held in Miami, Florida March 20-24.

March 4, 2009

Publications and Presentations

Madalina Furis, assistant professor of physics, published an article titled, "Anomalous Circular Polarization of Photoluminescence Spectra of Individual CdSe Nanocrystals in an Applied Magnetic Field" in a recent issue of Physical Review Letters. The work was done in collaboration with researchers at Los Alamos National Laboratory.

Jane Kolodinsky, professor and chair of Community Development and Applied Economics, has authored and co-authored several recently published articles, including "Affect or Information? Labeling Policy and Consumer Valuation of rBST Free and Organic Characteristics of Milk" in Food Policy, "The Use of Nutritional Labels by College Students in a Food-Court Setting" in the Journal of American College Health, and "Gender and Cultural Differences in the Acceptance of Functional Foods: A Comparison of American, Canadian and French College Students," also published in the Journal of American College Health

Sharyl Toscano, assistant professor of nursing, presented a session titled "Nature and Characteristics of Dating Relationships of Female Adolescents — Exploring Group Dynamic Effect" at the second annual Teen Intimate Partner Violence (IPV) Forum at the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation in Princeton, New Jersey on Jan. 29.

Awards and Honors

The American Heart Association recognized Jennifer Nachbur, senior communications specialist for the College of Medicine, with the 2009 Crystal Heart Award during the Annual Vermont Go Red for Women "Queen of Hearts" Luncheon on Feb. 19. Nachbur, who joined UVM in 1995, is a long-time volunteer with the American Heart Association, serving as Club Red Chair for the annual luncheon and major fundraising event. The Crystal Heart Award is given to an individual who exhibits great community spirit, goodwill, personal initiative and selflessly devotes their personal time to community causes.

A grant proposal submitted by Brian Reed, associate dean of the College of Nursing and Health Sciences and associate professor of rehabilitation and movement science, has been accepted for funding by the UVM International Incentives Committee (IIC). Reed will conduct a pilot project to support English as a second language services for CNHS students in need. UVM International Incentive Grants are intended to encourage and support faculty-sponsored international education efforts by UVM faculty. Funding for these grants is provided by the Provost's Office via the IIC.

February 25, 2009

Publications and Presentations

Declan Connolly, professor of education, will give the keynote address, "Energy System Considerations in Designing Training Programs," at the Collegiate Strength and Conditioning Coaches Association annual meeting in Nashville, May 6-8. Connolly will also give an invited talk at the American College of Sports Medicine annual meeting in Seattle, "Recent Advances in Muscle Adaptation to High Intensity Exercise," in May and will address the Nike National Running Camps in Beaverton, Ore. in August. That talk, "Using Heart Rate to Guide Training Intensity," resulted from new book contract Connolly has signed with McGraw Hill, The Heart Rate Training Bible.

Sean Hurley, assistant professor of education, is co-author of an article, "Solving Problems Using Matrix, Network, and Hierarchy Diagrams: The Consequences of Violating Construction Conventions," appearing in The Quarterly Journal of Experimental Psychology.

Kathy Manning, professor of Integrated Professional Studies, is the editor of the new publication, Journal of Student Affairs Research and Practice, which is dedicated to scholarship and innovation in student affairs.

Michael Radermacher, associate professor of molecular physiology and biophysics, and Kathleen Trybus, professor of molecular physiology and biophysics, will be presenting their research at the 53rd Annual Meeting of the Biophysical Society in Boston, Mass. on March 1 and 2, respectively. Radermacher is chair of a workshop, titled "Enzymes in Energy Metabolism". Trybus will be one of four presenters at a symposium titled, "Cargo Transport by Single Molecular Motors " and will discuss "Class V Myosins in Budding Yeast: Theme and Variations." Twenty-one symposia, four minisymposia, and five workshops will take place during the five-day meeting, which begins Feb. 28. The meeting is expected to be covered in the journal Analytical Chemistry and weekly magazine Chemical and Engineering News.

Julie Richards, undergraduate program coordinator and senior lecturer in the Department of Social Work, is author of an invited chapter, "Boundary Dilemmas and the Privilege of Knowing Heroes: Rural School Social Work," in a book tentatively titled Working in Social Work: The Real Work Guide to Practice Settings (Routledge Publishers). An article by Richards, "International Service-Learning (ISL):Creating an Intersession Social Work Course in India," has also been accepted by Quick Hits for Service-Learning: Successful Strategies from Award-winning Teachers, and is due out this fall.

Awards and Honors

Stanley L. Witkin, professor of social work who recently returned from Hong Kong where he was a visiting professor at the Hong Kong Polytechnic University, will be a visiting scholar at the University of York, England in March of 2009.

February 18, 2009

Publications and Presentations

An article by Cynthia Gerstl-Pepin, chair of the Department of Education, will be published in Qualitative Research in 2009. The article, in press now, is titled, "Learning from Dumbledore's pensieve: Metaphor as an aid in teaching reflexivity in qualitative research." Gerstl-Pepin is also author of a chapter titled, "When worlds collide: Navigating poverty, scholarship and motherhood," in the forthcoming book Trajectories: The Social and Educational Mobility of Education Scholars From Poor and Working Class Backgrounds.

Jane Okech, assistant professor, Department of Integrated Professional Studies, is the lead author of a March 2009 article in the Journal for Specialists in Group Work titled, "The experiences of expert group work supervisors: An Exploratory Study." Her co-author on the paper is Deborah Rubel, an assistant professor of counselor education at Oregon State University.

Alan Wertheimer, professor emeritus of political science and senior research scholar in the Department of Bioethics, National Institutes of Health, has recently published (with Govind Persad and Ezekiel Emanuel) "Principles for allocation of scarce medical interventions," in The Lancet (2009) 373: 423-31.

Awards and Honors

A paper titled, "Accountability in Governance Networks: Implications from Hurricane Katrina," co-authored by Christopher Koliba, associate professor in community development and applied economics and his former graduate student, Russell Mills, won the best unpublished paper on public accountability and ethics from the Johnson Institute for Responsible Leadership at the University of Pittsburgh. Koliba also recently published a paper titled, "Communities of Practice as an Empirical Construct: Implications for Theory and Practice" in the International Journal of Public Administration.

February 11, 2009

Publications and Presentations

Christopher W. Allen, emeritus professor of chemistry, presented a talk titled, "How Molecules Move Electrons" on Jan. 23 at Machine Project in Los Angeles California. Machine Project provides educational resources to people working with technology, collaborates with artists to produce site-specific works, and promotes conversations between scientists, poets, technicians, performers, and the community of Los Angeles as a whole.

Dennis Mahoney, professor of German, published "'Tails of Hoffnung': Transatlantische Metamorphosen unterdrückter Menschlichkeit in Marc Estrins Insect Dreams: The Half Life of Gregor Samsa" in Kulturökologie und Literatur. Beiträge zu einem transdisziplinäären Paradigma der Literaturwissenschaft (Heidelberg: Winter, 2008). Mahoney analyzes Marc Estrin's creative "recycling" of possible variations of Kafka's works in his novel. Relating American and European cultural, social and scientific history of the first half of the twentieth century from the perspective of the man-turned-insect Gregor Samsa, Mahoney argues, allows Estrin to combine culture-critical meta-discourse with ecological counter-discourse.

Wolfgang Mieder , professor of German and Russian, published "'New Proverbs Run Deep': Prolegomena to a Dictionary of Modern Anglo-American Proverbs" in the proceedings of the 1st Interdisciplinary Colloquium on Proverbs. In the article, Mieder presents the procedures for putting together the first comprehensive collection of modern Anglo-American proverbs for which he and his collaborators, Frank Shapiro, Jane Garry (both Yale University) and Charles Doyle (University of Georgia) secured a contract with Yale University Press. The collection will include 500 proverbs that originated after 1900, contextualized references from literature and mass media as well as illustrations in forms of cartoons, advertisements or caricatures. Professor Mieder is also the author of "Sein oder Nichtsein" — Das Hamlet—Zitat in Literatur, Übersetzungen, Medien und Karikaturen, a book that traces occurrences of the famous quotation from Shakespeare's Hamlet,"To be, to be or not to be, that is the question," in translations, parodies, poems, advertisements, graffiti or headlines. Mieder not only documents the continued use of the original quote over the centuries but also the attempts of translators, writers and cartoonists to revitalized the much-used phrase and give it new meaning.

Denise Pickering, assistant professor of integrated professional studies, has been invited to be a panelist at the American Counseling Association Convention in Charlotte, N.C. in March on "ism" intersects with heterosexism and homoprejudice. Pickering, who is a member of the Transgender Committee developing transgender competencies for the counseling profession, will represent sexism/transgender issues.

Pickering will also co-chair the second Social Justice Summit for the 2009 Association for Counselor Education and Supervision Conference in San Diego, Cal. in October 2009.

Helga Schreckenberger , professor and chair of the German and Russian departments, is the author of "'Heimat,' Exile, and Modernity in Carl Zuckmayer's Vermonter Roman." Schreckenberger reads the novel as Zuckmayer's literary exploration of the existential consequences of exile for individual identity. Rural Vermont, where Zuckmayer spent the majority of his years in exile, serves as model for the idea of "Heimat," a counter image to urbanization, industrialization, transience, relativity and self-reflexivity associated with modernity and exile. Schreckenberger also published "The Destruction of Idyllic Austria in Wolf Haas's Detective Novels," in Crime and Madness in Modern Austria: Myth, Metaphor and Cultural Realities (Cambridge, New York: Cambridge University Press, 2008). She argues that Wolf Haas masterfully appropriates the formal and thematic conventions of the traditional detective story for his satirical criticism of Austrian society.

Katharine Shepherd, associate professor of education, published a co-authored article, "Preparing school leaders to build and sustain engagement with families and communities" in The 2008 Yearbook of the National Council of Professors of Educational Administration, and was invited to submit a book chapter, " Leading beyond labels: Re-defining the principal's role through a social justice framework," in a recent book by Richard Johnson III, assistant professor of education, Transformative Leadership: Preparing Students for Global Social Justice.

Jesse C. Suter, research assistant professor of education, published a number of co-authored articles in journals in 2008 and the following this year: "Recent research on paraprofessionals in inclusion-oriented schools" in the Journal of Educational and Psychological Consultation (currently in press); "Special education personnel utilization and general class placement of students with disabilities: Ranges and ratios." in Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities. Suiter will present "Effects of wraparound from a meta-analysis of controlled studies" at the 22nd Annual Research Conference, A System of Care for Children's Mental Health: Expanding the Research Base in Tampa, Fla. in March.

Awards and Honors

On January 29, the College of Medicine's Class of 2011 celebrated their completion of the challenging 18-month-long Foundations level of the Vermont Integrated Curriculum with a special awards ceremony.

Awards and recipients included:

  • Outstanding Foundations Course: "Cardiovascular, Respiratory and Renal Systems"
  • Foundations Course Director Award: William Hopkins, associate professor of medicine and course director, "Cardiovascular, Respiratory and Renal Systems."
  • Foundations Teaching Award: William Raszka, professor of pediatrics and course director, "Attacks and Defenses." The recipient of this award will be hooding the Class of 2011 at their graduation and will be recognized with other Teachers of the Year from the past.
  • The Dean Warshaw Integration Award: Richard Salerno, assistant professor of pediatrics. This award recognizes the faculty member whose teaching best captured the spirit of the Vermont Integrated Curriculum.
  • The Silver Stethoscope Award (a.k.a. "Inspirational Cameo of the Year"): Jean Szilva, lecturer in anatomy and neurobiology. This award recognizes the faculty member who had few lecture hours, but made a substantial contribution to students' education.
  • Above and Beyond Award: Ellen Cornbrooks, lecturer in anatomy and neurobiology. This award recognizes the faculty member (not necessarily a lecturer) who went above and beyond the call of duty to help the students in their learning objectives.
  • Best Support Staff (Non-teaching): Sarah Keblin, director of annual giving in the medical development and alumni relations office. This award recognizes the staff member who best supported students in areas besides teaching.
  • American Medical Women's Association (AMWA) Gender Equity Award: Pamela Gibson, associate professor of pathology
  • Wellness Committee Peer Recognition Award: Presented jointly to second-year medical students Matthew Meyer and David Diller "for their ability to create a team atmosphere and community of inclusion" in organizing and leading the UVM College of Medicine Marathon Team.

Michael Lahey, a senior majoring in medical laboratory science, received a $2,500 scholarship from the American Society for Clinical Pathology. Scholarship awards of $2,500 are available from Siemens each year for 34 students in their fourth year or final clinical year of a NAACLS accredited Medical Technologist/Clinical Laboratory Scientist (MT/CLS) program. Siemens Healthcare Diagnostics is working with the American Society for Clinical Pathology as its administering partner for this scholarship.

February 4, 2009

Awards and Honors

The Center on Aging at the University of Vermont has announced the following appointments: Deborah Worthley, director of the Osher Lifelong Learning Institutes of The University of Vermont, as associate director of education; Paul Newhouse, professor of psychiatry, as associate director of research; Barbara McIntosh, professor of business administration, as associate director, policy; Jeanne Hutchins, manager, Elder Care Services, Fletcher Allen Health Care Program Manager.

Publications and Presentations

John P. Burke, professor of political science, served as a roundtable panelist in a discussed entitled "White House Transitions: Moving Out/Moving In." The event was sponsored by the National Archives and the White House Historical Association.

Lesley-Ann Dupigny-Giroux, associate professor of geography, gave an invited talk titled "Challenges to Promoting Climate Literacy at the Secondary and Undergraduate Levels" at the January 25-28 Global Climate Change Research and Education Workshop, World Meteorological Organization, Geneva Switzerland.

Juliet L. Halladay, assistant professor in the College of Education & Social Services has had the following three papers accepted at conferences: Rethinking text difficulty: Relationships between text difficulty, motivation, and comprehension for second grade readers. American Educational Research Association (AERA), April13-17, 2009, San Diego, CA; Text difficulty, reading comprehension, and reading motivation: An investigation of second graders' experiences with self-selected texts. International Reading Association (IRA), May 6, 2009, Minneapolis, Minn.; and "Testing the frustration reading level: Connections between word recognition, comprehension, and frustration" at the Society for the Scientific Study of Reading (SSSR), June 25-27, 2009, Boston, Mass. Halladay was also selected to serve as a member of the editorial review board for the Journal of Literacy Research, which is the research journal for the National Reading Conference (NRC).

Diane U. Jette, professor and chair of rehabilitation and movement science, authored an article in the February 2009 issue of the journal Physical Therapy titled, "Use of Standardized Outcome Measures in Physical Therapist Practice: Perceptions and Applications." Co-authors are James Halbert, Courtney Iverson, Erin Miceli, and Palak Shah, all doctoral in physical therapy students graduating in May.

Brenda Solomon, associate professor in social work, was as invited to give a talk based on a recent paper titled, "Classing the profession: The production of practitioner difference/status" at the Memory, Myth & Meaning In a Time of Turmoil National Conference of the American Association for Psychoanalysis in Clinical Social Work on March 1 in New York City.

January 28, 2009

Publications and Presentations

Daniel Van Der Vliet, Director of Vermont Family Business Initiative in the School of Business Administration, was named a member of the Board of Advisors for FamilyBusinessWiki.org. The Family Business Wiki was founded to create "a publicly available resource for family businesses around the world" and has the vision to "be the 'Wikipedia' for family business — the first-stop global resource for knowledge and links to other resources about family business." The site was used as an active part of the curriculum taught by Dean Rocki-Lee DeWitt and Mr. Van Der Vliet in Fall, 2008, named BSAD 195C, Leading & Managing the Family & Closely Held Business. Read more about FamilyBusinessWiki.org. Read more about the course.

David Brock, assistant professor of rehabilitation and movement science, co-authored a paper titled "Association Between Insufficiently Physically Active and the Prevalence of Obesity in the United States" in the January 2009 Journal of Physical Activity and Health.

Harold Dauerman, professor of medicine, was one of three co-chairs of the 4th Annual Platelet Colloquium held January 22 to 24 in Washington, D.C., where he also presented a lecture titled "Platelet-Directed Antithrombotic Therapy: Are We Failing to Bridge a Gap Between Trials and Clinical Applications in Elderly Patients?" Dauerman is also director of the Cardiovascular Catheterization Laboratory at Fletcher Allen Health Care.

Alisa Johnson, clinical instructor in radiology, presented research titled "Feasibility of 3T MR in the Evaluation of Acute Abdominal Pain in Children and Young Adults"

at the annual Radiologic Society of North America meeting in Chicago on December 1, 2008. Co-authors on the study include Trevor Andrews, adjunct instructor in radiology, Jay Gonyea, researcher/analyst in radiology and manager of the UVM Research MRI Facility; Janice Gallant, associate professor of radiology and pediatrics; Timothy Higgins, assistant professor of radiology; and Steven Braff, professor and chair of radiology.

Vikas Anathy, research associated in pathology, is first author on a paper titled "Redox amplification of apoptosis by caspase-dependent cleavage of glutaredoxin 1 and S-glutathionylation of Fas" in the January 26 online edition of the Journal of Cell Biology. Lead author on the article is Yvonne Janssen-Heininger, professor of pathology. Co-authors include Scott Aesif, M.D./Ph.D. student; Amy Guala, lab research technician in pathology; Marije Havermans in pathology; Niki Reynaert, visiting scholar in pathology; and Ralph Budd, professor of medicine and director of immunobiology.

Rodger Kessler, research assistant professor of family medicine, published a paper titled "Across the Great Divide: Introduction to the Special Issue on Psychology in Medicine" in the January Journal of Clinical Psychology.

Katanna Conley, assistant professor of education, will give a presentation titled "Just Regular Talking: Undergraduates as Book Club Leaders in a Rural Working-Class High School" at the New England Campus Compact Regional Conference in March of 2009.

Awards and Honors

Mackenzie Leonard, a senior member of Delta Delta Delta, VP of Order of Omega, second time co-chair of Relay for Life and past VP for Panhellenic, is a recipient for an Order of Omega academic/leadership scholarship. Andrew "PJ" Kasprisin, also a PJ senior member of Phi Delta Theta and past president of Phi Delt who is currently serving his second term as a VP on IFC and has been the chair of Summer Greek Council and an active committee member for Relay for Life, was recently named a recipient of one of the Order of Omega scholarships to NGLA (Northeast Greek Leadership Association).

January 21, 2009

Publications and Presentations

Mary Cushman, professor of medicine, is the lead author of a November 2008 Annals of Neurology article titled, "Estimated 10-Year Stroke Risk by Region and Race in the United States: Geographic and Racial Differences in Stroke Risk."

January 14, 2009

Publications and Presentations

Frank Bryan, John G. McCullough Professor of Political Science, presented a paper titled "Collective Law-Making in the New England Town Meeting" at an international conference of the Santa Fe Institute: "Collective Decision-Making: From Neurons to Societies." According to Bryan, the town meeting anchored the "human activity" range of a continuum of collective decision-making venues — like hives of honey bees.

Richard G. Johnson III, assistant professor of educational leadership and policy studies in the College of Education and Social Services, authored the book A 21st Century Approach to Teaching Social Justice: Educating for both Advocacy and Action and the co-authored Resilience: Queer Professors from the Working Class.

Juliet Halladay, assistant professor of education, presented a paper at the National Reading Conference titled "Reconsidering frustration-level texts: Second graders' experiences with difficult texts" in Orlando, Fla. in December.

Randall Headrick, associate professor of physics, gave an invited talk on Dec. 4 at the 2008 meeting of the Materials Research Society in Boston. Headrick's talk, "Real-time Studies of Roughness Evolution and Pattern Formation During Thin Film Growth and Surface Processing," details a way of studying the structure of surfaces and interfaces with ripples and dots. The work was funded by the National Science Foundation and Department of Energy.

Cynthia C. Reyes had an article titled "El Libro de Recuerdos [Book of Memories]: A Latina Student's Exploration of Self and Religion in Public School" in Research in the Teaching of English, Vol. 43, No. 3, pps. 263-285. Reyes also published an article, "Disturbing the Waters": Using Relational Knowledge to Explore Methodology," in The Journal of Educational Foundations, Vol. 22, No. 3-4.

Lance Smith, an instructor in integrated professional studies, had an article titled "Social Privilege, Social Justice, and Group Counseling: An Inquiry" published in the Journal for Specialists in Group Work, 33, 351-366 that was also accepted for presentation at the 26th Annual Winter Round Table on Cultural Psychology and Education at Columbia U. The theme for this year's conference is "Incorporating Multicultural Models in Psychology and Education." The editors of The Journal For Specialists in Group Work invited Smith to be a reviewer for an upcoming special issue entitled "Social Justice Issues in Group Work" wherein "The focus will be on group work research and practice that attends to inequities in power, privilege, and access to resources experienced by diverse populations through forces such as racism, sexism, heterosexism, classism, ableism, and ageism."

Rory Waterman, assistant professor of chemistry, published a cover article in Dalton Transactions, a leading European chemistry journal. The article, "Metal-phosphido and -phosphinidene complexes in P—E bond-forming reactions," describes a selection of recent advances in the developing field of metal-mediated reactions that catalyze bonds between phosphorous and other elements.

December 10, 2008

Publications and Presentations

Mark Youndt, associate professor of business administration, was appointed to the editorial board of Journal of Management Studies. International in scope and readership, the JMS is a multidisciplinary journal, publishing articles on organization theory and behaviour, strategic and human resource management — from empirical studies and theoretical developments to practical applications. Youndt and his coauthors, Caroline D'Abate (Skidmore College) and Kathryn Wenzel (Vitale, Caturano, and Company), had an article titled "Making the Most of an Internship: An Empirical Study of internship Satisfaction" accepted for publication in the Academy of Management Learning and Education Journal. Internships are becoming more widely used as learning tools for students to help fill in the gap between classroom learning and the practice of business; thus, it is important to understand what aspects of these experiences make them the most worthwhile. This particular study examined three broad factors (job characteristics, work environment characteristics, and contextual factors) which may contribute to internship satisfaction. Results indicate that characteristics of the job (specifically, task significance and feedback) and characteristics of the work environment (in particular, learning opportunities, supervisor support, and organizational satisfaction) are the best predictors of internship satisfaction. Business schools, faculty, students, and host companies can use these findings to design these key developmental experiences in such a way as to maximize intern satisfaction and learning.

Barbara McIntosh, professor of business administration, served as a moderator at a Grafton Conference in November that focused on Vermont Aging Workforce Issues. McIntosh also spoke about older workers at an expert panel conference sponsored by the Society for Human Resource Management (SHRM) in Washington D.C. In addition, McIntosh was an author/co-author of three papers presented at the Gerontological Society of America meetings in Washington, D.C. The papers were titled "Changes in the Determinants of Financial Satisfaction Among Those 65 and Older: Results from the General Social Surveys" with Nick Danigelis, professor of sociology; "Commitment and Retention: Older Nurses compared to Their Younger Colleagues"; "Cross Sectoral Inter-organizational Partnerships: A Blueprint for Capacity-building in Local Aging-related Networks" with Barbara Hirshorn.

An article by Kevin C. Chiang, associate professor of business administration, was accepted for publication in the Journal of Real Estate Finance and Economics. The article is titled "Discovering Reit Price Discovery: A New Data Setting." The study decomposes real estate investment trust (reit) returns into two components: real returns and public returns. The real returns are based on the changes in the private, appraisal-based net asset values of reits, whereas the public returns are measured by the variations in reits' premiums/discounts. This study then investigates the price discovery of reit prices. The results indicate that lagged public returns are useful in predicting real returns. In addition, the study documents concurrent factor exposures for public returns and lagged factor exposures for private returns under a variety of asset pricing models. Overall, the results are consistent with the notion that public markets are more efficient in processing information. Chiang also co-authored an article with Thomas zhou that was accepted for publication in the Journal of Accounting and Finance. The article is titled "Do Aggressive Funds Reallocate their Portfolios Aggressively?" The study examines pairs of asset allocation mutual funds that are controlled for all informational attributes, except for the level of risk aversion. Standard mean-variance models of portfolio choice suggest that the percentage rebalancing of common stocks in aggressive funds would be the same as that in conservative funds. However, the study finds the rebalancing of common stocks in aggressive funds to be disproportionally less intense.

Four current and former graduate students in Communication Sciences and one current undergraduate student (a McNair Scholar) presented their research papers with their faculty collaborators at the annual convention of the American Speech-Language-Hearing Association (ASHA) in Chicago, Illinois this November. Patricia Prelock, a member of the Board of Directors of the American Speech-Language-Hearing Association as Vice President for Standards and Ethics in Speech Language Pathology, Blake Clifton, Rebecca McCauley and Efleda Preclaro Tolentino presented a paper titled "Pen Pal Exchanges Between Children with Autism & Their Typical Peers." Laura Bonazinga, Tiffany Hutchins, Prelock, McCauley and Timothy Stickle presented a paper titled "The Revised Maternal Perception of Children's Theory of Mind Measure." Michael Cannizzaro and Herald Bonnici presented a paper titled "A Case study in Myotonic Dystrophy: Measures over 15 intervention sessions." Erin Ferland-Maskell and Prelock presented a papep titled "Maternal Perceptions & Observations of Play in Children with Autism." Prelock, Hutchins, Tiffany Hartwell and Gayle Belin, who also participated in the final portion of the ASHA Leadership Development Program, a group of 20 professionals chosen from a nationwide search, presented a paper titled "Retention of SLPs in Vermont: Relationships among caseload, workload, job satisfaction and Best Practice."

December 3, 2008

Publications and Presentations

David Brock, assistant professor of rehabilitation and movement science, is lead author of a paper for publication in the Journal of Physical Activity and Health. Titled "Association Between Insufficiently Physically Active and the Prevalence of Obesity in the United States," the paper will be published in January 2009. Brock's co-authors on the study are Charles Cowan, former chief statistician for the Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation and U.S. Department of Education and David Allison, president-elect of the North American Association for the Study of Obesity.

Jack Leahy, professor of medicine and chief of endocrinology, diabetes and metabolism, is lead author of a Nov. 21 Journal of Biological Chemistry paper titled "In Vivo and in Vitro Studies of a Functional Peroxisome Proliferator-activated Receptor γ Response Element in the Mouse pdx-1 Promoter." Co-authors on the study include Dhananjay Gupta, postdoctoral associate in endocrinology, diabetes and metabolism; Thomas Jetton, associate professor of medicine; and Mina Peshavaria, research assistant professor of medicine.

Awards and Honors

The YWCA of Vermont board of directors elected six new directors at its annual meeting of members on Nov. 19, including Jane Hill, assistant professor of engineering in environmental microbiology and biotechnology, and Regina Toolin, assistant professor of secondary education.

Robert Manning, professor of natural resources, is the first winner of the George Wright Society Social Science Achievement Award. This new award was established by the GWS Board of Directors to recognize outstanding achievements in social science research that influences management of parks, protected areas, and cultural sites. Manning is cited for his leadership in establishing and carrying out a long-term and nationally prominent program of applied research on visitor use and management in many units of the U.S. national park system, as well as his distinguished record of teaching and published scholarship in park-related social science and outdoor recreation issues. The award will be presented at a joint National Park Service/GWS Awards Banquet on the evening of Thursday, March 5, in Portland, Ore.

November 19, 2008

Publications and Presentations

Mary Cushman, professor of medicine, and Neil Zakai, assistant professor of medicine, are co-authors on a paper in the October 2008 Journal of the American Geriatrics Society titled "Anemia Is Associated with the Progression of White Matter Disease in Older Adults with High Blood Pressure: The Cardiovascular Health Study."

Awards and Honors

Three faculty members in the department of pediatrics were recognized at the recent fall meeting of the American Academy of Pediatrics Vermont Chapter. Paula Duncan, clinical professor of pediatrics and medical director of the Area Health Education Centers program, Joseph Hagan, clinical professor of pediatrics, and Judith Shaw, research associate professor of pediatrics and executive director of the Vermont Child Health Improvement Program, jointly received the 2008 Green Mountain Pediatrician award. Traditionally, this award is given to a chapter member who has shown outstanding service and dedication to the care of children. For the 2008 Green Mountain Pediatrician award, VT AAP members voted unanimously to present the award to this group for their incredible vision, work, and leadership. Duncan, Hagan and Shaw are editors of the new AAP Bright Futures Guidelines for Health Supervision. In addition, Shaw was awarded a special honorary membership in the Vermont Chapter due to her outstanding leadership and devotion to children's issues and improving the systems of care that affect the health and well-being of children. According to current Vermont Chapter President Kimberly Aakre, "Judy has been one of our Chapter's exceptional partners, working with us on behalf of Vermont's children and families. We believe she is truly a 'Vermont pediatrician' at heart and are honored to have her as one of our members."

John P. Burke, Professor political science, gave the keynote address on Nov. 14 on the "Presidency of George W. Bush," at a conference hosted by Grand Valley State University's Hauenstein Center for Presidential Studies, Grand Rapids, MI.

Mary Cushman, professor of medicine, has been named the chair of the American Heart Association (AHA) Council on Epidemiology and Prevention. This multidisciplinary council, a science arm of AHA, is dedicated to understanding the causes of cardiovascular disease and applying knowledge to optimize cardiovascular health across the lifespan in diverse populations, as well as promoting advocacy at all levels. With this post, Cushman serves on the Science Advisory and Coordinating Committee (SACC) of AHA. SACC reports to the AHA Board of Directors and in that function, serves as the final review group for all science statements or comments arising from the AHA, which publishes about 50 Scientific Statements and Guidelines each year.

November 12, 2008

Publications and Presentations

John Hughes, professor of psychiatry and psychology, authored a paper that was recently identified by Essential Science Indicators as the highest cited paper in the research area of Nicotine Replacement Therapy, an honor which also indicates it is one of the most-cited recent papers in its field. Titled "A meta-analysis of the efficacy of over-the-counter, nicotine replacement," the paper was originally published in the journal Tobacco Control in March 2003. A Q&A piece with Hughes, as corresponding author of this "Fast Moving Front" article is posted on the Thomson Reuters ScienceWatch® website for November 2008.

Christopher Francklyn, professor of biochemistry, and Anand Minajigi, graduate student in biochemistry, published a paper titled "RNA-assisted catalysis in a protein enzyme: The 2′-hydroxyl of tRNAThr A76 promotes aminoacylation by threonyl-tRNA synthetase" in the November 7 Early Edition of the Proceedings of the National Academy of Science (PNAS).

Wolfgang Mieder, professor of German and Russian, published "Proverbs Speak Louder Than Words" Folk Wisdom in Art, Culture, Folklore, History, Literature and Mass Media, a collection of ten essays illustrating the significance of proverbs in the past and present. Mieder documents their multifaceted use and occurrence in literature, politics, art, folklore, mass media, and popular culture including comic strips and bumper stickers. Each essay demonstrates the communicative value of proverbs, their versatility and universality, which makes them an inevitable prerequisite for cultural literacy. In addition, Mieder contributed an article to a volume dedicated to the Nobel Prize-winning German author Günter Grass. His contribution, "'Vermont.' Günter Grass' grünes Gelegenheitsgedicht," presents an analysis of Grass' poem on Vermont and its different translations into English provided by UVM German students.

Awards and Honors

Jane Okech, assistant professor in the Counseling program (IPS) and her collaborators Megan Johnson (Cross Roads Counseling Services & Counseling Program Alumni), Deborah Rubel (Oregon State University), Randall Astramovich and Wendy Hoskins (University of Nevada, las Vegas) were honored with the Western Association for Counselor Education & Supervision (WACES) 2008 Research Award. The award recognized the contribution of their empirically based article Doctoral research training of counselor education faculty" which was published in the December 2006 issue of the Journal for Counselor Education & Supervision. The award was presented at the recently concluded Western Association for Counselor Education & Supervision Conference (November 5-9), Palm Springs, California.

Deborah Worthley, director of the Osher Lifelong Learning Institute in UVM's division of continuing education, has been named associate director for education of the recently-announced Center on Aging at UVM. Jeanne Hutchins, current manager of Elder Care Services at Fletcher Allen, has been named program manager of the Center on Aging.

November 5, 2008

Publications and Presentations

Matthew W. Bovee, assistant professor of business administration, will present preliminary results in a peer-reviewed working paper entitled "Characteristics of Decision-Useful Financial Reporting Information: An Empirical Validation of the Proposed International Accounting Model" at the 13th International Conference on Information Quality, at MIT Sloan in Boston on 15th November. The paper empirically validates a foundational model influencing the quality of financial reporting information — the United States' accounting model of the attributes of useful information. In the near future this model is set to be incorporated into an international standard, globally affecting professional decisions about the characteristics of useful financial reporting information and thus its quality for a multitude of business users. While validated information quality models exist in Information Systems as potential substitutes, these have not been fully reconciled with descriptive models of information usefulness in accounting. Using survey data from business information users as defined by the accounting standards, and partial least squares analyses, the study empirically tests and compares the proposed model for the international accounting standard and a pre-existing empirically validated Information Quality model from Information Systems.

October 29, 2008

Awards and Honors

The Sister Elizabeth Candon Distinguished Service Award was presented to Gayle Wright Bress at the annual meeting of the Vermont Women in Higher Education on Friday October 24, 2008 at Lake Morey. This award is presented to a woman who has shown evidence of promoting and working toward the advancement of women in higher education and involvement at the national, regional, state, and local levels in related activities. Wright Bress was recognized for her commitment to the advancement of women and underrepresented minorities in sciences and higher education evident in her work as UVM's Hughes Endeavor for Life Science Excellence program coordinator. She was also credited for nurturing the careers of future scientists and engineers by administering programs such as Association for Women in science (AWIS), Society for the Advancement in Science (SACNAS), and Vermont Experimental Program to Stimulate Competitive Research (VT EPSCoR).

October 22, 2008

Publications and Presentations

Jeff Layne, a postdoctoral associate in the department of pharmacology, is lead author of a September 2008 article in the American Journal of Physiology - Cell Physiology titled "NFATc3 regulates BK channel function in murine urinary bladder smooth muscle." Co-authors on the article include David Hill-Eubanks, research assistant professor of pharmacology, and Mark Nelson, professor and chair of pharmacology.

October 15, 2008

Publications and Presentations

Cathy Beaudoin, assistant professor of business administration, presented a co-authored paper at the annual meeting of the American Accounting Association in Anaheim, Cal. in August 2008. The paper, "An Empirical Investigation of the Defined Benefit Pension Plan Freeze Decision," investigates key motivations underlying firms' decisions to freeze their defined benefit (DB) plans. It examines whether DB plan freeze decisions are motivated by: financial accounting considerations; cash flow related incentives; and improving a firm's competitive position. Based on a sample of S&P 500 firms, the findings indicate that DB plan contribution volatility and improving the firm's competitive position do not impact the freeze decision process as significantly as management might suggest. Instead, results imply that the effect of proposed pension accounting changes plays a primary role in the decision to freeze DB plans. Co-authors are: Nandini Chandar and Edward Werner, Drexel University.

Garrison Nelson, professor of political science, published "Democracy, Diversity, and the 2008 Presidential Election: Mapping State Electoral Votes by Diversity Propensity" in The International Journal of Diversity in Organisations, Communities & Nations.

David Novak and Christopher Hodgdon, assistant professors of business administration, and Lisa Aultman-Hall, director of the Transportation Research Center, recently had a paper accepted for publication in Network and Spatial Economics titled, "Nationwide Freight Generation Models: A Spatial Regression Approach." Feng Guo, professor of statistics, Virginia Tech, was co-author. The paper investigates spatial issues associated with freight generation models. A spatial regression modeling methodology is employed to correct for spatial autocorrelation — a linear correlation or dependence among variables based on spatial proximity. New variables are proposed, formulated, and then tested to capture spatial effects. Multi-zone spatial variables are proposed, based on the assumption that certain social-economic and/or transportation hubs will not only impact freight generation in the zone where they are located, but will also impact freight generation in the surrounding zones. The research demonstrates that linear regression models using widely available socioeconomic data suffer from spatially correlated residuals. The application of spatial regression modeling techniques can improve model fit and eliminate problems associated with the spatial autocorrelation.

October 8, 2008

Awards and Honors

Brooke Mossman, professor of pathology and director of the environmental pathology program, received the 2008 Wagner Medal Award at the 9th International Conference of the International Mesothelioma Interest Group (IMIG) in Amsterdam on September 25. The award recognizes an individual who, in the opinion of the IMIG committee, has made a major contribution to mesothelioma research, either clinical or laboratory, over a number of years. Established in 2002, the award is named in honor of the late Chris Wagner, who pioneered research into mesothelioma and was the first to identify the association between asbestos exposure and mesothelioma.

Paula Duncan, clinical professor of pediatrics, youth health director for the Vermont Child Health Improvement Program and medical director of the Office of Primary Care, received the Oral Health Service Award and Job Lewis Smith Award from the American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP). Awarded by the AAP Section on Pediatric Dentistry and Oral Health, the Oral Health Award recognizes an individual who, during the course of his/her career, has made significant contributions to the advancement of pediatric oral health through activities within the Academy. Duncan was honored with the Job Lewis Smith Award by the AAP Council on Community Pediatrics in recognition of her outstanding service in community pediatrics. Duncan is chair of the AAP Council Management Committee and chair of the AAP Bright Futures Implementation Advisory Committee. She is a co-editor of the third edition of Bright Futures.

Judy Cohen, professor of nursing, was selected by the Snelling Institute as a fellow for the 08-09 Vermont Leadership Institute.

Burton Wilcke, professor and chair of medical and laboratory sciences, will serve on the faculty of the George Washington University International Institute for Public Health Laboratory Management, a two-week program targeting laboratory directors from developing countries held in Washington, D.C. October 13 to 26. Participants from 13 different countries in South America, Africa and Southeast Asia are expected to attend. Wilcke was recently invited to serve on the Editorial Board for a special Supplement to the journal Public Health Reports titled "The US Public Health Laboratory System."

Publications and Presentations

Judy Cohen presented research titled "The experience of movement meditation: A dance of rhythmic paradox and time" at the Sigma Theta Tau International, Kappa Tau Chapter Research Night on October 2, 2008 with co-authors Betty Rambur, dean of the College of Nursing and Health Sciences, and Cheryl Laskowski, assistant professor of nursing.

October 1, 2008

Awards and Honors

Paula Duncan, clinical professor of pediatrics and youth health director of the Vermont Child Health Improvement Program (VCHIP), is the recipient of the American Academy of Pediatrics' (AAP) 2008 Clifford Grulee Award. Sponsored by the AAP Executive Committee and established in 1951, this award recognizes outstanding service to AAP beyond that required of the elected leadership. Duncan will be presented with the award at the Annual Business Meeting at the AAP National Conference and Exhibition in Boston, Mass., on October 13.

The Pediatric Inflammatory Bowel Disease Network for Research and Improvement (PIBDNet) Trailblazer Improvement Collaborative, led by Richard Colletti, professor and vice chair of pediatrics, has been selected as an Improve First initiative by the Alliance for Pediatric Quality (Alliance). Inflammatory Bowel Disease (IBD) is a serious chronic condition affecting 100,000 children and adolescents. This collaborative of PIBDNet will develop a guideline and algorithms for Model IBD Treatment, as well as measures to track performance and outcomes. The Trailblazer Improvement Collaborative was selected from more than 50 improvement initiatives associated with priorities identified by the Alliance's expert task force. The priorities are based on the Alliance's Improve First philosophy: Spreading well-designed, well-run improvement initiatives with demonstrated results is one of the most important first steps the pediatric community can take to measurably improve children's health outcomes and transform how care is delivered. To date, the Trailblazer Collaborative has enrolled more than 1700 patients, creating the largest pediatric IBD registry in the country.

September 24, 2008

Awards and Honors

Edwin Bovill, professor and chair of Pathology & Laboratory Medicine; Naomi Fukagawa, professor of medicine; and Judith Van Houten, Perkins Professor of Biology, Director of the VT EPSCoR, Vermont Genetics Network and HELiX Programs, were inducted into the Vermont Academy of Science and Engineering (VASE) on September 23, 2008.

Charles MacLean, associate professor of medicine, was named interim associate dean for primary care at the College of Medicine. MacLean will replace Dr. John Fogarty, who left UVM to become dean at Florida State University College of Medicine. MacLean will maintain his faculty appointment and role as research director for the Office of Primary Care, and continue his teaching, research and clinical practice within the Primary Care Internal Medicine division.

The Horticultural Research Center's rain garden won first place in Chittenden County in a statewide contest of gardens designed to aid in stormwater management. Rain gardens are designed to divert runoff from storm drains, reducing pollution while nourishing plants and flowers.

UVM's Vermont Institute for Artisan Cheese has been awarded a $99,000 grant to work on-site with 20 Vermont cheesemakers to develop protocols to help manage food safety issues. The well-timed grant follows a recent recall in Quebec after consumer illnesses and deaths linked to cheese consumption. "We hope this proactive approach," said Catherine Donnelly, professor and co-director of VIAC, "will help foster the growth of future successful cheesemaking enterprises in Vermont."

September 17, 2008

Awards and Honors

The department of medical laboratory and radiation sciences was one of seven university- and college-based programs to receive new state-of-the-art equipment through the Abbott Labs Are Vital® Equipment Donation Program. Recipients were selected from 225 grant applicants from 29 states across the United States. Christine Griffin, lecturer of medical laboratory and radiation sciences, submitted the grant application, which resulted in a donation of a HEMO Analyzer CD1800 valued at $38,000 with three years of full service and supplies. Recipients were announced July 30 at the American Association of Clinical Chemistry Annual Meeting in Washington, D.C.

Ödul "Laurie" Amburgey, a maternal-fetal medicine fellow in the department of obstetrics, gynecology and reproductive sciences, was selected as one of four recipients of a 2008 Vision Grant from the Preeclampsia Foundation for her study of brain vessel function in preeclamptic women. Preeclampsia, a condition characterized by high blood pressure, protein in the urine, as well as swelling in the hands and face during the second half of pregnancy, is responsible for at least 76,000 maternal deaths each year. Amburgey's research seeks to determine if some women have certain blood factors that make them more susceptible to brain swelling.

Bradley Palmer, research assistant professor of molecular physiology and biophysics, received a five-year, $1.25 million grant from the National Heart Lung and Blood Institute to support his research on the role of zinc in the relaxation processes of individual heart muscle cells known as cardiomyocytes. An essential mineral found in almost every cell of the human body, zinc stimulates the activity of dozens of enzymes responsible for critical chemical reactions. Palmer's research will specifically address the role of protein-bound zinc and free zinc ion in the heart's relaxation process. Relaxation plays a significant part in heart function, because it permits the chambers to fill with blood before the next contraction.

September 10, 2008

Publications and Presentations

Kevin McKenna, professor of Russian, published "Didactics and the Proverb: The Case of Alexander Solzhenitsyn's Literary Memoir, The Oak and the Calf." McKenna examines how Solzhenitsyn uses proverbs to illustrate and underscore the message of his five-hundred page memoir about his experiences as a writer in the Soviet Union during the tumultuous period from 1962 to 1974.

David Jones, assistant professor of business administration, and his coauthors, Drs. Neil Fassina and Krista Uggerslev (Asper School of Business, University of Manitoba) had an article published in the most recent issue of the Journal of Organizational Behavior. Their meta-analytic findings challenged accepted wisdom on the structure of cooperative work behaviors, and showed that employees tend to target the performance or withdrawal of these behaviors towards the sources of perceived fair and unfair treatment. They also showed that these cooperative behaviors are simultaneously influenced by gestalt perceptions of fairness based on treatment from both immediate supervisors and the larger organization. Also this September, David and his co-author, Dr. Martin Martens (John Molson School of Business, Concordia), presented a paper at the annual meeting of the British Academy of Management in Harrogate, England, titled "Justice, overall fairness, and employee attitudes: Using qualitative data to understand how context affects quantitative findings."

Wolfgang Mieder, professor of German and Russian, who stepped down as chairperson after 31 years, is the editor of the English translation of Lutz Röhrich's seminal work on fairytales titled, "And They Are Still Living Happily Ever After: Anthropology, Cultural History, and Interpretation of Fairy Tales." Mieder also edited the 25th volume of "Proverbium: Yearbook of International Proverb Scholarship." The volume contains Mieder's article "Let Us Have Faith that ‘Right Makes Might': Proverbial Rhetoric in Decisive Moments of American Politics," an examination of proverbs in American political discourse. He traces the use of proverbs in the political speeches of American presidents from Abraham Lincoln to George W. Bush as well as in those of political activists like Frederic Douglass, Elizabeth Cady Stanton, and Martin Luther King Jr. In addition, Mieder is the author of "Don't Swap Horses in the Middle of the Stream: An Intercultural and Historical Study of Abraham Lincoln's Apocryphal Proverb," which traces the origin of the proverb and documents its subsequent use throughout different centuries and cultures.

Jane Okech, assistant professor, Department of Integrated Professional Studies is the author of a September 2008 article in the Journal for Specialists in Group Work titled "Reflective practice in group co-leadership." She is also the lead author of a September 2008 article in the International Journal for the Advancement of Counselling titled "Informing culturally competent practice through cross-racial friendships." Her co-author on the paper is Julia Champe, assistant professor, Department of Educational Psychology and Special Education, Southern Illinois University, Carbondale.

Helga Schreckenberger, professor of German and Russian, published "Joseph Hahn: Kunst als Ehrfurcht vor dem Leben," illustrating the influence of the exile experience on Joseph Hahn's poetry. Hahn, a refugee from Nazi Germany, lived in Middlebury for the past eighteen years. He died on October 31, 2007. Schreckenberger argues that the experience of exile impacted not only the thematic aspect of Hahn's work but also its language.

Awards and Honors

Dr. Richard Colletti, professor of pediatrics, received the 2008 Distinguished Service Award from the North American Society for Pediatric Gastroenterology, Hepatology and Nutrition (NASPGHAN) in recognition of his excellence and service to the field. Colletti will be presented with the award at a ceremony during the NASPGHAN and Children's Digestive Health and Nutrition Foundation joint annual conference in San Diego on Saturday, November 15.

Dr. Roger Young, professor of obstetrics, gynecology and reproductive sciences, was elected to the national Board of Trustees of the March of Dimes Foundation. March of Dimes trustees, who serve as volunteers, represent the public in governing the organization and advancing its mission and serve five-year terms. Young has reviewed scientific grant applications for the March of Dimes for six years, and served as a member of the organization's Scientific Advisory Committee since 2006. He is a recognized leader in the field of uterine physiology of pregnancy, and has a long-range goal of decreasing the rising rate of prematurity in the United States, which is consistent with a component of the mission of the March of Dimes.

Karen Richardson-Nassif, associate dean for faculty and staff development and diversity in the College of Medicine, and colleagues will be receiving the Best Paper Award for 2007 from the Research In Medical Education Committee of the Association of American Medical Colleges at the organization's annual meeting in San Antonio on November 4. The group is being recognized for their joint paper titled "Crafting Successful Relationships with the IRB, which was presented at the AAMC annual meeting in 2007.

September 3, 2008

Publications and Presentations

Representatives of the UVM Area Health Education Center (AHEC) Program Office delivered a poster presentation and a workshop at the National AHEC Association (NAO) 2008 Conference in Denver, Colorado June 28 to July 1. Dr. Richard Pinckney, assistant professor of medicine, presented a workshop titled "Teaching health professionals about pharmaceutical advertising: experience from the Program in Wise Prescribing." Laurie Hurowitz, research assistant professor of medicine, delivered a poster presentation titled "Promoting Healthier Weight in Adult Primary Care in Vermont – A Public Health and AHEC Partnership." The NAO national conference takes place every two years and represents a nationwide sharing of successful efforts to connect students to careers, professionals to communities, and communities to better health.

Awards and Honors

Betsy Greene, associate professor of animal science, received the 2008 Communication Award in recognition of Excellence in Use of Communications Media from the National Association of County Agricultural Agents. Greene was the national winner for her work with eXtension's HorseQuest website. Greene is also co-chair of the "HorseQuest Community of Practice" which includes over fifty national equine experts throughout the country.

Dr. Ted James, assistant professor of surgery, received the Cancer Liaison Physician Outstanding Performance Award from the Commission on Cancer (CoC) for his leadership and guidance as a physician champion. This national award recognizes physicians who go above and beyond expectations to improve and provide direction to their cancer program. James is among 55 recipients nationwide to achieve this recognition.

Rex Forehand, Heinz and Rowena Ansbacher Professor of Psychology and director of the University's clinical training program, received the American Psychology Association's 2008 Award for Distinguished Career Contributions to Education and Training at their annual meeting on August 15.

Adam Lock, assistant professor of animal Science, received the 2008 Young Scientist Award for Research for the Northeast by the American Dairy Science Association and the American Society for Animal Science. Lock is noted for his research on the role of fats and lipids in animal and human nutrition as well as studies with ruminant nutrition.

Lee Nelson, clinical professor of rehabilitation and movement science, received Massachusetts General Hospital's Institute of Health Professions Distinguished Alumni Award at their commencement on May 3, 2008. This award recognizes individuals who have worked to expand and refine the scientific basis for clinical practice through research and scholarship; contributed to new models of practice to foster provision of effective, affordable and ethical care; and contributed significantly to advancing the mission, reputation and standards of the Institute.

Monica Patton is one of fifteen fourth-year medical students to receive an American Medical Association Foundation Physicians of Tomorrow Scholarship. Recipients were nominated by their medical school dean and chosen by a selection committee based upon their academic standing and financial status, as well as community involvement, letters of recommendation and personal statement. Each student will receive a $10,000 scholarship to help defray medical school expenses. Currently participating in a clinical rotation at Maine Medical Center, Patton recently completed "The CDC Experience: Applied Epidemiology Fellowship at CDC," a competitive fellowship program that selects eight medical students from around the country each year to spend 10 to 12 months at the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

Students in the Department of Animal Science won awards at the national meetings of the American Dairy Science Association and the American Society for Animal Science in Indianapolis. Emma Wall, a doctoral student also in the Vermont Genetics Network Bioinformatics Core was the sole recipient of the H. Allen Tucker National Appreciation Award for travel to the American Society of Animal Science's annual meeting in Indianapolis last week. She presented two papers of significance to the Vermont dairy industry with her advisor, Thomas McFadden, as coauthor. They were, "The acute response to milk removal and the long-term response to frequent milking treatment involve distinct mechanisms" and "The persistent milk yield response to frequent milking during early lactation is associated with persistent changes in mammary gene expression." She was presented with a check and plaque at the awards dinner. Lindsay Lord, a master of science candidate won second place in the Northeast Graduate Student Competition for her presentation, "Photoperiod regulates diurnal expression patterns of genes related to immune function in PBMC of heifers." Jennifer Scudder, also a master of science candidate, placed third in the Northeast Graduate Student Competition with her presentation, "Colicin E1 and EDTA have additive antimicrobial effects against E. coli isolates in bovine milk."

Denise Youngblood's book Russian War Films: On the Cinema Front, 1914-2005 was named a Choice Outstanding Academic Title. Youngblood, professor of history, has also received a grant from the Kennan Institute for Advanced Russian Studies to support her current project, "Double Vision: Soviet and American Films during the Cold War" (with Tony Shaw).