Global Issues & Education
  • A GENERATION IN SEARCH OF A FUTURE:  A Speech Delivered by George Wald.  Cademan Records, New York.  Harvard's Nobel Laureate in biology, George Wald, gives his perspectives on learning, double-talk, the terror of nuclear weapons, and of death and the future of M.I.T. on March 4, 1969.
  • AMERICA IN THE WORLD.  Intercom #80, GPE*. Four varied activities which deal with the American dream and American economic, social, and geopolitical global power.
  • BASIC FACTS ABOUT THE UNITED NATIONS.  This remarkably thorough resource summarizes the past and ongoing efforts of the UN and its affiliated agencies.  The book begins with an explanation of the UN Charter and the structure of the organization.  Subsequent chapters describe in detail what the UN does in the areas of peacekeeping, economic and social development and human rights.
  • CARRIBEAN CONNECTIONS:  Edited by Catherine A. Sunshine and Deborah Menkart.  Lesson Plans By Catherine A Sunshine and Erland Zygmuntowicz.  NECA, 1991.  This book is centered around Jamaica.  It covers many historical events and folklores.  Some include:  The Marcus Garvey Movement, Louise Bennett, National poetess of Jamaica, and From Rasta to Reggae.
  • CATCHING UP WITH A CHANGING WORLD.  A Primer on World Affairs.  by Leonard S. Kenworth. This book is a selection of ten major themes concerning our contemporary global society and brief writing concerning them.
  • CURRENT ISSUES IN GLOBAL EDUCATION.  By C. Jefferson, D. Lavdis, Renaldo Rivera.  The Center for Learning, Reprinted 1998.  This activity book covers a variety of issues about Global Education such as Population, World Hunger, Health and Environmental Issues, Foreign Affairs, Science and Technology, and Social Justice.  The lessons are intended to inspire students to think on a global scale and to act on a local level.  Grades 7-12.
  • EARTH GAME.  World Futures Society.  A cooperative game whose players work as a team moving about the earth's surface in order to deal with emerging problems.  3rd grade and up.
  • EARTHSHAPES.  by Joseph N. Portney. Creative Publications, 1976.  Twelve charts mapping the world in different shapes.  Includes questions for discussion, summary of characteristics and a bibliography of materials relating to Earthshapes, mapping, geometry and navigation.
  • EARTHSHIP.  By James M. Oswald and Estela Matriano.  Four dimensional fluid geography of Spaceship Earth.  This book is intended to sharpen the basic skills and understandings required by earthmanship.
  • EARTHSHIP.  Institute for World Order, 1974.  Activity book to help students develop understanding of the whole earth system.  Grades 1-12.
  • EDUCATION IN A WORLD OF CHANGE.  Intercom 84/85 GPE*.  Sample lessons, activities and guidelines to stress common elements in every culture as a way of overcoming misperceptions and stereotypes.
  • EXPLORATIONS IN THE EMERGENT PRESENT.  Intercom 77, GPE*.  Discussions and lessons dealing with the future.  Activities include thinking about and predicting the future, choosing alternatives based on limits to growth, and a national policy choices' simulation.
  • EXPLORING COMMUNICATION.  by Peter R. Stillman, Cathryn J. Long, and David C. King, GPE*. 1979.  A wide-ranging variety of activities that can be used to develop communication skills in English, social studies, or art.  Places a special emphasis on the barriers to clear and effective communication.
  • EXPLORING THE DEVELOPING WORLD:  Life in Africa & Latin America.  By Ronald S. Byrnes.  1993.  Designed to awaken curiosity and make foreign countries less foreign, these supplemental activities profile the emerging political and economic powers in Africa and Latin America.  Written with an eye for impartiality and the belief that teachers should promote student-centered activities.  Grades 7-12.
  • FIVE IDEAS FOR GLOBALIZING U.S. HISTORY.  by Angene Wilson. NCSS*, 1982.  Describes five examples of ways in which U.S history can be taught with a global dimension.  Examples include independence ideas--U.S. and Mozambique and a shirt factory in Ireland (Industrial Revolution).  Each example is developed fully and suggestions for further activities are included.
  • GETTING STARTED IN GLOBAL EDUCATION:  A Primer for Principals and Teachers.  by Thomas Collins and Sally Banks Jakariyeu.  Arlington, Virginia, 1982.  Sponsored by the National Association of Elementary School Principals, this paper defines and discusses global education, and outlines possible goals.
  • GLOBAL EDUCATION AT THE GRASS ROOTS PROFILES OF SCHOOL BASED PROBLEMS.  by David Dembo, Brent Feigenbaum, and Ward Morehouse. Contains initiative, focus, curriculum, instruction, staff, scheduling, students, administration, community, facilities, external relations and evaluation brief on over 40 programs in the United States. For all levels (K-12).
  • GLOBAL EDUCATION AT THE GRASS ROOTS PROFILES OF SCHOOL BASED PROBLEMS.  by David Dembo, Brent Feigenbaum, and Ward Morehouse. Contains initiative, focus, curriculum, instruction, staff, scheduling, students, administration, community, facilities, external relations and evaluation brief on over 40 programs in the United States. For all levels (K-12).
  • GLOBAL HISTORY: A Curriculum Guide.  Office of Curriculum Development and Support, N.Y.C. Public Schools, Curriculum Production Unit, Rm. 617, 131 Livingston St., Brooklyn, NY. 11201.  This guide has two major emphases, first it deals with regional history including contacts and interactions among groups and, second it deals with the interrelationships among the world's regions since 1500.  Secondary.
  • GLOBAL ISSUES IN THE MIDDLE SCHOOL, 3rd EDITION.  By John Benegar, Jacquelyn Johnson, and Laurel R. Singleton.  SSEC and CTIR Publications, updated 1994.  Presenting concepts and information related to global issues at an early age is important in developing an understanding of and an appreciation for other cultures.  Seeing other peoples' commonalities can help break down the myths and stereotypes that form around groups who are perceived as “strange” and encourage open attitudes toward new ideas.  This book contains 27 activities. Grades 6-8.
  • GLOBAL ISSUES:  Activities and Resources for the High School Teacher.  by Kenneth A. Switzer and Paul T. Mulloy. CTIR*, 1979. A valuable guide to teaching about contemporary global concerns in the classroom.
  • GLOBAL PERSPECTIVES HANDBOOK.  by Dick Kraft and David Victor. Indiana University, Mid-America Program, Social Studies Development Center, Bloomington, 1975.  This handbook contains six lessons which can be applied to any course to provide a global perspective and a greater understanding of interdependence.
  • GLOBAL PERSPECTIVES:  Bridging Social Studies and Language Arts.  by Peter R. Stillman, David C. King and Sharon Flitterman King, Intertcom 88, GPE*. Provides creative new ways to deal with such themes as effective communication, barriers to communication, and analyzing opinions and values in the media.
  • GLOBAL PERSPECTIVES:  The Human Deminsion, Part 1, Self-Knowing and Humanity-Knowing.  Intercom #86, GPE*. Suggests ways of adding a humanistic perspective to four diverse topics: colonialism in Africa, sports, scientific discovery, and human rights.
  • GLOBAL PERSPECTIVES:  The Human Deminsion, Part 2, Planet Knowing, and Planet-caring.. Intercom #87, 1977.  GPE*.  Focus is on tensions between the need for change and the need to care for the natural environment.  Examines ways diverse groups--in India, Antarctica, and the United States--deal with specific environmental issues.
  • GLOBAL PERSPECTIVES: A Humanistic Influence on the Curriculum.  (Series of K-12 guides) from Interdependence by David C. King.  Center for Global Perspectives.  New York, 1975.  Series of guides, geared to existing texts, focuses on developing curriculum with a global perspective.  The objective is to provide students with ways of seeing relationships between course material and one's own life, and relating self and subject matter to a world view.
  • GLOBAL PRIMER:  Skills for a Changing World.  By H. Thomas Collins and Fred Czarra.  Center for Teaching International Relations,  1991.  Designed for elementary and junior high students, this series of global studies learning activities with reproducible student handouts provides practice in a variety of skills, including social studies, math, science, and language arts.  Divided into four major areasÐ World Basics, World Awareness, World Communications, and Map of Global SkillsÐ the book contains activities such as "Population and Size of Continents," "What Is a World Problem?," "Reading Latitude and Longitude," "We Are All Immigrants," and "How Do We See Others?"  Grades K-8.
  • GLOBAL STUDIES FOR AMERICAN SCHOOLS.  by Howard Mehlinger and Harry Hudson.  National Education Association, Washington.  Offers rationale, lessons, evaluation and resources for global study.  Six units of study are discussed--planet earth, families, community, food and energy, working and human rights.
  • GLOBAL STUDIES: A Look at History through Political Cartoons.  By Leonard F. Romano.  The Perfection Form Company, 1990.  Timely and divisive issues in global studies are explored through political cartoons in these two reproducible activity books.  GLOBAL STUDIES I covers apartheid in South Africa, foreign aid, political assassination, the domino theory, U.S.-Japanese relations, and reform in China.  GLOBAL STUDIES II probes the importance of oil, the Israeli-PLO dispute, reform in the former Soviet Union, change in Poland, the Cold War, and conflict in North Ireland.  Grades 7-12.
  • GLOBAL WINNERS: 74 Learning Activities for Inside and Outside the Classroom.  Edited by Jan Drum, Steve Hughes, and George Otero.  Intercultural Press. 1994.  A rich resource book containing 74 exercises, role plays, simulations and other activities for use inside and outside the  classroom.  The materials cover a broad range of global environmental, demographic, intercultural, economic, social and political issues and are grouped under six themes: state-of-the-planet awareness, developing perspective consciousness, valuing diversity, living responsibly with others, understanding issues and trends, and building the capacity for change. Grades K - 12.  229 pp.
  • HELPING BOYS AND GIRLS DISCOVER THE WORLD.  by  Leonard S. Kenworthy,(ed.)  UN Association of USA, New York, 1978. Suggested activities and resources for promoting a global awareness among children are presented in this guide.  Elementary-Junior High.
  • HELPING OURSELVES: Local Solutions to Global Problems.  by Bruce Stokes.  W.W. Norton and Company, New York, 1981.  A description of efforts made at the community level to solve housing, food, health, energy, and other problems.  Community gardening, cooperative housing, preventive health care are among the considered.
  • INTERDEPENDENCE-CURRICULUM AID.  The World Affairs Council of Philadelphia, 1976.  Provides good general background to the study of Interdependence including topics; Food and Nutrition, Global Economy, Money, Trade, Development, Human Rights, Oceans, The New Frontier, Peace and Disarmament, Resource Scarcity, Science and Technology, World Law and International Institutions.
  • INTERNATIONAL EDUCATION FOR SPACESHIP EARTH.  by David C. King, Thomas Y. Crowell. New York, 1971.  Suggests a "spaceship earth" perspective for education, reviewing recent curriculum projects, innovations in teaching methods and resources, and strategies for change.
  • MATHEMATICS AND GLOBAL SURVIVAL.  by Richard H. Schwartz. College of Staten Island, New York, 1979.  A selection of mathematical problems related to current global issues, e.g. pollution, hunger, etc.  College.
  • MOVING TOWARDS A GLOBAL PERSPECTIVE:  Social Studies and Second Languages.  Intercom 104, GPE*.  Develops a rationale and goals for the cooperative involvement of language and social studies educators in global education.  Eight lessons act as models to illustrate how educators can incorporate greater global understanding in their lessons.  Grades 7-12.
  • SKILLS FOR THE FUTURE.  by Gary R. Smith. CTIR*, 1979.  (grades 5-12.  Designed to prepare students for the Twenty-First Century, the activities in this unit focus on the rate of change and exponential growth of population.
  • STATE OF THE WORLD ATLAS.  By Heidi Hursh and Michael Prevedel.  A variety of skill building activities coordinated with maps in The State of the World Atlas.  The adaptable format gives teacherrs a flexible way to raise complex global issues.  Grades 7-12
  • TEACHER'S RESOURCE MANUAL ON WORLDMINDEDNESS.  by Ida Urso. Graduate School of Education, Occasional Paper No. 8, University of CA at L.A., 1981.  An extensive K-12 annotated bibliography of materials, organizations, action groups and resource centers that deal with global education, the future, food and hunger, development, peace and other topics.
  • TEACHING ABOUT SPACESHIP EARTH (INTERCOM #71)  Center forWar/Peace Studies, New York.  A role-playing experience that focuses on the global problems of war, peace, conflict and social change.for the middle grades.
  • TEACHING TOWARD GLOBAL PERSPECTIVES.  Intercom 73, GPE*. Nine suggestions which deal with interdependence, prejudice, energy, the environment and development through simulations and activities.
  • THE EARTHPEOPLE.  by Joe Abruscato and Jack Hassard. Goodyear Publishing Company, Santa Monica, 1978.  Activity book about people, places, pleasures and other delights.  All ages.
  • THE GEOGRAPHY ROUTE TO A GLOBAL PERSPECTIVE.  Intercom 101, GPE*. A sequence of eleven lessons helps students discover the effects of culture on our perception of and relationship to the environment.  Students examine the relationship between human survival needs and the environment, and the influence of culture on how we meet our basic needs.
  • THE STATE OF THE WORLD ATLAS.  By Dan Smith.  Offering an instant graphic view of the world from a socioligical and global perspecitve, this newly revised atlas features full color maps and charts that reveal timely information about the state of the world.  Among the topics covered are world trade, international debt, inflation, military expenditures, gender inequality, racism, illiteracy, censorship, rligion, AIDS, ecology and the world wide effects of dramatic political changes in Eastern Europe, Russia, Central Asia and elsewhere.  Short reading sections explain each of the 50 main mpas presented.  The coordinated activity book provides approximately 20 self directed exercises.
  • THE WORLD IN A CHOCOLATE BAR.  UNICEF*.   A poster which uses the production of a chocolate bar to explore the idea of global systems.  Shows how problems in one part of a system affect another part, via a mapping activity.
  • U.S. TRADE POLICY:  Competing in a Global Economy.  Choices Education Project, Brown University, Box 1948, Providence, RI  02912.  Guides students in exploring how the debate over trade policy fits into our country's overall role in the world.  The unit considers the growing importance of economic issues in the international arena, especially with respect to our country's closest allies in Western Europe, East Asia, and North America.  Revised January 1995, 58 pages.
  • UNDERSTANDING THE UNITED NATIONS: Model Teaching Units for Primary, Secondary, and Teacher Education.  United Nations Association of Minnesota. 1992.  A valuable curriculum guide encouraging students to identify world problems, recognize the need for interdependence, and examine the UN's role as world problem-solver.  Suitable for a United Nations unit in a U.S. history or world area studies course, the eight lesson plans include objectives, teaching procedures, issues, and reproducible handouts. Instructions on how to establish a Model UN program included. Loose-leaf format. Revised edition. Grades 7-12.   
  • UNICEF'S FRIENDSHIP CIRCLE PUZZLE.  U.S. Committee for UNICEF.  Contents: 200 pieces.  Elementary.
  • WALK AROUND THE BLOCK.  By Ginny Graves.  Copyright 1997.  This book uses our communities in the present to learn about the past and plan for the future.
  • WORK IN TOMORROW'S WORLD.  by Rudie W. Tretten, Cathryn J. Long, and Margaret S. Branson.  GPE*.   Many lessons involve going outside the classroom for interviews and first-hand information.  A variety of in class scenarios are suitable for many different high school courses.
  • WORLD CORE CURRICULUM, JOURNAL AND MANUAL.  By Robert Muller School, 1989.  Educating our children for tomorrow:  that's what the WORLD CORE CURRICULUM is all about.  This comprehensive journal and teacher's guide offers a framework for both global and spiritual education. Adult.  
  • WORLD HISTORY TIME CHART.  Pictorial Charts Educational Trust, London. This time chart ranges from 3000 BC. to the mid 1900's. It is a vertical time scale with a highlighted world map and breakdown of major world cultures. This is secondary level.
  • WORLD ISSUES.  Educational Resource Center, 198l.  Activity sheets which supply quantitative data on important world issues such as global interdependency, political freedom, population distribution.
  • WORLD RESOURCES AND RESPONSIBILITIES.  Terrytown:  Prentice-Hall Media.  Two filmstrips, two cassettes, and a teacher's guide examine the problems of growing global interdependence.  Students are asked to analyze the world situation and discuss the practical and moral positions of the U.S. and other wealthy nations.  Junior and Senior High School; Adult.
  • WORLDWAYS:  Bringing the World into the Classroom.  By Pamela Elder and Mary Ann Carr.  Addison-Wesley Publishing Company, Inc., 1987.  Make global education a part of your teaching with this complete activity book.  Based on Bloom's Taxonomy, WORLDWAYS gives students an inÐdepth global perspective.  Your students will research their cultural backgrounds, compare governments, study the universality of folk tales, compile a directory of world organizations involved with conservation issues, conduct opinion polls, celebrate international festivals. publish an international newsletter.  More than 80 activities in all!  Plus reproducible, lists of resources for students and teachers, rationale, and theory.  Grades 4-8.