Development
  • A1981 WORLD BANK ATLAS.  The World Bank, Wash., DC., 1984.  A compendium of statistics on development, population, growth rates and GNP.
  • A SUSTAINABLE DEVELOPMENT CURRICULUM FRAMEWORK FOR WORLD HISTORY & CULTURES.  Global Learning, Inc.  This practical resource book focuses on the environment, development, and equity.  Suggests ways of incorporating ecological and economic concerns and justice issues into social studies and world history programs.  Includes sample lessons and a guide to student action.  Grades 9-12. 
  • COMMUNITY BUILDING IN THE CLASSROOM.  By Vanston Shaw.  Kagan Cooperative Learning, 1992.  Designed to foster a love of learning in all age groups, this innovative resource offers 37 activity lessons with accompanying reproducible materials for conflict resolution, communication, and mutual support among students.
  • DEVELOPMENT DATA BOOK.  Five key concepts of development in one handy booklet.  This new edition of the Development Data Book contains the latest World Bank data at the time of publication and is ideal for presenting a quick overview of the developing world.  It gives students 18 pages of color maps, charts, tables, text and data to help master five important statistical concepts used to measure economic and social development: Life expectancy at birth. Primary school enrollment, Population growth rate, GNP per capita, Merchandise exports.  The Development Data Book helps students increase their knowledge and understanding of economic development and social and economic conditions in developing countries.  With the help of an easy-to-read table containing data on 17 social and economic indicators for 149 countries, students can strengthen their ability to perform statistical calculation; make and interpret maps, charts, and tables; analyze information; and develop critical thinking and problem-solving skills.  A separate 50-page Teaching Guide includes outlines maps, a full range of comprehensive activities, worksheets for each chapter, and a test to measure achievement. 
  • FOCUSING ON GLOBAL POVERTY AND DEVELOPMENT: A Resource Book for Educators.  by Jayne C. Miller.  Washington:  Overseas Development Council, 1974.  Designed to help teachers include a global perspective in existing courses such as U.S. History, Anthropology, Economics, World History, with background essays on issues and ideas for class activities, simulation, role-playing plus case studies, maps and charts.
  • MAKING GLOBAL CONNECTIONS IN THE MIDDLE SCHOOL:  Lessons on the Environment, Development and Equity.  By:  William, Ed. Luderer.  Using the ideas developed in the World Commission on the Environment and Development's report Our Common Future as a springboard, this curriculum guide teaches middle school age students about global issues such as sustainable development, cultural assumptions and equity concerns.  Each lesson promotes student involvement through handouts and activities. 
  • MAKING THE PEACE:  A Violence Prevention Curriculum.  A comprehensive teaching handbook with all the information needed to implement a 15 session core curriculum.  It offers step by step instructions for he sessions, anticipates difficult issues that may arise, and suggests ideas for follow up both within the classroom and within the school or youth program.
  • MULTINATIONAL CORPORATIONS:  The Quiet Revolution? (Intercom #74).  New York:  Center for War and Peace Studies, 1974.  What MNC's are, their impact on global economic interdependence, and what controls are required.
  • NATIONALISM:  The Issue that WonÕt Go Away.  ISTEP/Nationalism Curriculum Unit.  Center for Latin American Studies.  San Diego State University, San Diego, CA  92182.  This is a new, 82 page curriculum unit.  The unit contains eleven classroom activities designed to develop and apply the concept of nationalism throughout the Modern World history course.    Activities include a rationale and objectives, teacher instructions, reproducible student handouts, and suggestions to the teacher for integrating the lessons and the concept of nationalism into the Modern World History course.  Each unit comes 3-hole punched and binder-ready. 
  • POVERTY GAME.  Oxford, Oxfam Youth Department.  Developed in England, this simulation game aims at increasing understanding of the problems of survival confronting a subsistence farmer in West Africa.  Junior-Senior High School.
  • RETHINKING GLOBALIZATION by Bill Bigelow and Bob Peterson, Eds. Published by Rethinking Schools, Milwaukee, Wisconsin. American teenagers wearing sneakers made in China, South Americans watching U.S. television shows is only a partial view of our "global village". We are connected, but in very unequal ways -- ways that pose dire threats to the health of the planet. Rethinking Globalization alerts readers to the challenge we face -- and also spotlights the enormous courage and creativity of people working to set things right. This essential resource includes role plays, interviews, poetry, stories, background readings, hands-on teaching tools, and much more.
  • TEACHER’S GUIDE CHAPTER REPRINTS.  Updated popular chapter from previous editions of the World Resources Teacher's Guide are now available individually or as a complete set.  Each loose-leaf Chapter Reprint includes teaching objective, lesson plans, student handouts, overhead transparency masters, and suggestions for further reading.
  • TEACHER’S GUIDE TO WORLD RESOURCES.  By:  Mary Paden and Sarah A. Snyder.  This 160-page handbook with practical lesson plans on global environmental issues is designed for use in high school social studies, geography, science, and global studies curricula.  It can be used with itÕs source publications:  World Resources 1994-95 and Car Trouble (p.2), or by itself.  Featured topics in this new edition include:  global consumption and the environment; the role of women in the management of natural resources in the developing world; the environmental effects of automobiles; and the global impacts of two population giants --- India and China.  For each topic, the Teacher’s Guide provides an introduction to the issue, teaching objectives, practical lesson plans, student handouts and enrichment activities, overhead transparency masters, and more.
  • TEACHING ABOUT THE CONSUMER AND THE GLOBAL MARKETPLACE.  by Bruce Koranski, et al., 1981.  Thirty-one activities which provide an introduction to the link between personal and global economics--how what we consume is a reflection of personal values and worldwide events.  Grades 4-12.
  • TEACHING ELEMENTARY AND SECONDARY STUDENTS ABOUT THE GLOBAL ECONOMY AND HUMAN DEVELOPMENT:  Local Resources and Strategies for Using Them.  by Robert B. Wojach.  The author discusses the value of a community oriented approach to teaching human development.  He focuses on a global education program in Columbus, Ohio, and describes services and resources this network has provided.
  • THE DEVELOPMENT PUZZLE.  (Fourth Edition) by Nance Lui Fyson.  London:  VCOAD, 1974.  A source book for teaching about the "rich world/poor world" and efforts towards "one-world" development.  Pieces of the puzzle include trade, aid, population growth, health, food, agriculture, industrialization, education, attitudes, and values.
  • THE INCREDIBLE ROCKY VS. THE POWER OF THE PEOPLE.  Joel Andreas, NACLA, Wash., DC., 1975.  A humorous look at the history and far-reaching influence of the Rockefeller family.
  • THE NEW INTERNATIONAL ECONOMIC ORDER.  Cambridge, Ma.:  American Friends Service Committee, 1976.  Intended for individual and group study, this kit is divided into sections:  the New-International-Economic-Order. World-Resources/Corporations/National-Priorities.
  • THE STORM OF CRISIS:  A Study and Action Pack for World Development.  New Internationalist Publications, Ltd.  Looks at major crises of our times--food, population, unemployment, violence and the environment.  Contains posters, wall charts, flyers, magazine on New-Economic-Order and newsletter "Yes, But What Can I Do?".
  • TOWARDS A BETTER WORLD.  International Bank for Reconstruction and Development, Wash., DC., 1981.  Examines the issue of economic development and developing countries.  1 filmstrip, teaching guides, economic summaries, cassette tape and case studies.
  • U.S. TRADE POLICY:  Competing in a Global Economy.  Choices Education Project, Brown University, Box 1948, Providence, RI  02912.  Guides students in exploring how the debate over trade policy fits into our country’s overall role in the world.  The unit considers the growing importance of economic issues in the international arena, especially with respect to our country’s closest allies in Western Europe, East Asia, and North America.  Revised January 1995, 58 pages, one-week.
  • WHAT IS A RESOURCE?  by Laurence Becker, Stanford University, 1985. Students will investigate the term 'development' . It is a preliminary introduction to new terms and inquiries and teaches the critical thinking skills required for interpreting multiple perspectives.
  • WORLD RESOURCES 1994-95.  World Resources Institute in collaboration with the United Nations Environment Programme and the UN Development Programme. Widely recognized as an authoritative assessment of the world’s natural resource base, the World Resources report is a definitive reference on the global environment with the latest information on essential economic, population, and natural resource conditions and trends for nearly every country in the world.  Recommended as a primary reference for faculty, college, and advanced senior high students, World Resources 1994-95 includes the following special features: 1.Population and the Environment  2.Natural Resource Consumption 3.Women and Sustainable Development 4.Global Data Tables 5.Current Trend Report Relied upon by policy makers, journalists, scientists, environmental professional, teachers, students, and concerned citizens around the world, World Resources is the best desktop reference on the global environment available.