University of Vermont

The College of Arts and Sciences

Center for Holocaust Studies

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Please note that unauthorized video or sound recordings are prohibited at these events.

ADA: Individuals requiring accommodation should contact UVM Conference and Events Services at 802-656-5665 no later than one week before the event date.

Schedule of Events

Link to Past Events

Events for the 2014-2015 Academic Year

 

Spring 2015

Monday, March 09, 2015, 7:00 PM, Waterman Memorial Lounge (Room 338)

Jan Grabowski University of Warsaw

On the Margins of the Holocaust: Hunting Down the Jews in Poland

Jan Grabowski, University of Ottawa

Based on his most recent book, Professor Grabowski's lecture will focus on how Polish Jews who had survived the ghettos and deportations to the death camps were killed as a result of betrayal by their Polish neighbors. Using largely untapped Polish, Jewish, and German sources, he will show how this stage of the killing process in one Polish county relied on the cooperation of the local population, and how that cooperation was based on hatreds inherited from previous generations as well as opportunities provided by the Nazi occupiers.

Born in Warsaw, Poland, Professor Jan Grabowski obtained his M.A. in history from the University of Warsaw in 1986 and his Ph.D. in history from Université de Montréal in 1994. He has taught at the University of Ottawa since 1993, and has also held guest appointments at universities in France, Israel, Poland, and the United States. In 2011 Professor Grabowski was named the Baron Friedrich Carl von Oppenheim Chair for the Study of Racism, Antisemitism, and the Holocaust at the Yad Vashem Holocaust Martyrs' and Heroes' Authority in Jerusalem. Professor Grabowski's most recent book, Hunt for the Jews. Betrayal and Murder in German-Occupied Poland, published by Indiana University Press in 2013, has been awarded the 2014 Yad Vashem International Book Prize.

Underwritten by the Altschuler Endowment for Holocaust Studies.
Co-sponsored by the UVM Russian and East European Program.

 

Thursday, April 2, 2015, 3:30 PM, UVM Davis Center, Livak Ballroom Room 417/419

Author Chris Bohjalian

 

 

 

 

The Story Behind the Sandcastle Girls: The Centennial of the Slaughter You Know Next to Nothing About 

By Award-winning author and Vermont resident Chris Bohjalian

 

Where do fact and fiction meet in a work of historical fiction? In Bohjalian's slide show, he will be sharing why he structured his novel of the Armenian Genocide, "The Sandcastle Girls," as a love story -- and where his personal family history fits in. Many of the images he will share come from his travels through the Middle East, Turkey, and Armenia.

Sponsored by the Miller Center for Holocaust Studies and the Middle East Studies Program.

 

Tuesday, April 14, 2015, 7:00 PM, Waterman Memorial Lounge (Room 338)

Dr. David Shneer

Annual Yom Hashoah Lecture

Grief: A History of the World’s First Holocaust Liberation Photograph

by Dr. David Shneer, University of Colorado

 

 

In January 1942, the Soviet Jewish photographer Dmitrii Baltermants became one of the first Holocaust liberator-photographers when he documented the Nazi mass murder of Jews and Sinti Roma outside the city of Kerch.  The image appeared widely shortly after the site’s discovery both within the Soviet Union and abroad.  Twenty years later, when Baltermants brought the photograph out of his archive, it now served a very different purpose.  No longer a historical document of Nazi atrocities, Baltermants, who had become one of the Soviet Union’s key cultural diplomats, turned his photojournalistic document into a stunning art photograph called “Grief" to be exhibited around the world as a memorial meditation on violence.  This talk will focus on Grief’s journey from the pages of magazines and Cold War era exhibitions to the white washed walls of the Museum of Modern Art where it appeared in the 2000s as Grief sat at the juncture of history and memory. 

Dr. David Shneer, Professor of History and Religious Studies and Director, Program in Jewish Studies at the University of Colorado, focuses his extensive research on 20th century European, Russian, and Jewish history and culture.  His newest book, Through Soviet Jewish Eyes: Photography, War, and the Holocaust (Rutgers University Press, 2011), winner of the 2013 Jordan Schnitzer Prize of the Association for Jewish Studies and finalist for the National Jewish Book Award, looks at the lives and works of two dozen Soviet Jewish World War II military photographers to examine what kinds of photographs they took when they encountered evidence of Nazi genocide on the Eastern Front.  In fall 2011, the traveling museum exhibit Through Soviet Jewish Eyes debuted at the CU Art Museum in Boulder, Colorado and then showed at the Museum of Jewish Heritage in New York City and at the Holocaust Museum Houston.  It will be opening at the University of Louisiana's Museum of Art in September 2014 and the Illinois Holocaust Museum in Chicago in February 2015.

His other books include Queer Jews, finalist for the Lambda Literary award, Yiddish and the Creation of Soviet Jewish Culture, finalist for the National Jewish Book Award, and New Jews: The End of the Jewish Diaspora, which has sparked discussion in publications like the Economist and the Jerusalem Post. His current project is Redeeming Germany: Yiddish Music Between Fascism and Communism. Shneer lectures nationally and internationally and has written for the Huffington Post, Rocky Mountain News and the Denver Post as well as publications dedicated to Jewish life and culture, including Forward, Pakntreger, Jewcy, and Nextbook.

Underwritten by the Altschuler Endowment for Holocaust Studies.

 

The Seventh Miller Symposium

April 18-19, 2015

Saturday, April 18, 2015
8:00 PM - 10:00 PM
University of Vermont Waterman Building, Memorial Lounge, Room 338

Sunday, April 19, 2015
9:00 AM - 6:00 PM
University of Vermont Waterman Building, Memorial Lounge, Room 338

Responses in the Middle East to National Socialism and the Holocaust, 1933-1945

Contemporary Reactions in the Middle East to Nazism and the Holocaust: Scholarship and the "War of Narratives"
Gilbert Achcar, School of Oriental and African Studies, University of London

Get out of Mosul, Hajj Amin: Iraqi Elites, Iraqi Jews, and Nazism
Orit Bashkin, University of Chicago

Demon and Heretic: Intellectual Representations of Hitler and Nazism in the Egyptian Public Sphere, 1938-1945”
Israel Gershoni, Tel Aviv University

Rescue or Rejection: Facts and Myths about Turkey and the Holocaust
Corry Guttstadt, University of Hamburg

Defining the Nation and its Other: Discussing Nazi Ideology in Syria and Lebanon during the 1930s
Götz Nordbruch, Georg Eckert Institut-Leibnitz Institut, Braunschweig

The Persecution of the Jews in Germany in Egyptian and Palestinian Public Discourses: A Comparative Perspective
Esther Webman, Tel Aviv University

Underwritten by the Carolyn and Leonard Miller Endowment for Holocaust Studies, and co-sponsored by the UVM Middle East Studies Program.

 

Monday, April 20, 2015, 4:30-7:00 PM, Billings Library

Symposium

Nazi Looting, the Monuments Men, and Art Restitution Today

Recent books and film treatments of the Allies’ restitution efforts have tended toward the triumphalist.  The recovery, safeguarding, and return of looted works has become a story of good overcoming evil.  This paper seeks to complicate that narrative. The Monuments officers worked in challenging circumstances and sometimes fell short of certain ideals.  The Allies’ restitution policies evolved amidst difficult political realities. The role of art dealers in this complex of issues is also ripe for reassessment.  And museum officials outside of Germany, both before and after 1945, behaved in ways that raise ethical questions. This paper argues for a more nuanced and balanced appraisal of those involved in the response to Nazi art looting—one that counters hagiographical tendencies in both the scholarly realm and in popular culture.

Speakers:

Sharon Flescher, Executive Director International Foundation for Art Research
Victoria Reed, Monica S. Sadler Curator for Provenance, Museum of Fine Arts, Boston
Jonathan Petropoulos, John V. Croul Professor of European History, Claremont McKenna College

Symposium organizers: Anthony Grudin and Kelley Helmstutler Di Dio (both of the UVM Department of Art and Art History

Sponsored by: Department of Art and Art History, UVM Humanities Center, the Robert Hull Fleming Museum, and the Miller Center for Holocaust Studies.

Last modified January 30 2015 01:19 PM