University of Vermont

College of Arts and Sciences

Department of Psychological Science

Undergraduate Student Research Profiles: 2011

Stephanie McDonough

Stephanie McDonough
Stephanie is pursuing a bachelor of science in psychology and will be graduating Spring 2011. She has been working as an undergraduate research assistant in professor Kelly Rohan's Mood Disorders Laboratory and Seasonality Treatment Program since 2009, and is currently working on her honors thesis with professor Lynne Bond. This project examines the effects of an undergraduate weight and health management course, VTrim, on students' self esteem, and ways in which these effects may vary with students' motivation to enroll in the course. The results of this project may inform the design of more effective and healthy weight loss programs, and identify psychological factors that might be involved in healthful dieting.

Stephanie is the recipient of both an Honors College Undergraduate Research Opportunity (UROP) grant as well as an Academic Programs for Learning and Engagement (APLE) award to fund her research project. After graduation, she plans to attend graduate school to pursue a Ph.D in Clinical Psychology.

Brittany Raymond

Brittany Raymond
Brittany placing a blocking arm on the set shifting maze. Animals are then placed in a 'start arm' and taught to recognize patterns which lead them to food.
"I am a senior majoring in psychology with a biobehavioral concentration, and started working in Professor John Green's laboratory the summer after my sophomore year. I have since developed experience in many behavioral tasks using rodent animal models, including eye blink conditioning, set-shifting, acoustic startle, elevated plus maze, and stress induced hypothermia procedures. Through participating in research at the University of Vermont, I've had the opportunity to explore questions that have never been empirically answered. Both the encouragement and support of the faculty provide students with the type of enthusiasm that could one day change the world . The majority of my work in the Green Laboratory has focused on examining Attention Deficit Hyperactive Disorder (ADHD) rodent models using prefrontal dependent tasks. After receiving the Undergraduate Research Endeavors Competitive Award (URECA) in the Fall of my junior year, I am now investigating relationships between voluntary exercise, anxiety, and learning mechanisms. After finishing my undergraduate work, I plan to continue my education by attending graduate or medical school."

Arielle Vincelette

Arielle Vincelette
"I am a senior psychology and sociology double major who became interested in social psychology while taking the introductory course on this topic with Professor Elizabeth Pinel. I became particularly interested in helping behavior after researching the Kitty Genovese case, and began to question the nature of helping behavior itself, as well as what kinds of circumstances convince us to either help or not help others. I started working in Professor Pinel's 'Seeing I' Laboratory in the summer of 2009 as a research assistant and have continued there up to the present, where I am currently working on an honors thesis. My research is concerned with the implications of shared subjective experiences with objectively similar or dissimilar others on helping behavior. After graduation, I plan to attend graduate school to further pursue my research interests."

Erika Weisz

Erika Weisz
"I am a senior pursing a bachelor of arts degree in psychology. I've been fortunate enough to have worked as an undergraduate research assistant under the supervision of Profesors Jom Hammack and Annie Murray-Close. Currently I'm writing an undergraduate honors thesis through Professor Murray-Close's Social Development Laboratory, examining the influence of aggression and peer status on anxiety and depression in children. After graduation this May, I hope to find a full-time research assistant position, ideally in a laboratory studying children, before applying to graduate school."

Undergraduate Student Research Profiles

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