University of Vermont

HISTORIC PRESERVATION PROGRAM

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Graduate Curriculum

digital microscope

The M.S. Degree in Historic Preservation is a 36-credit hour program that is normally completed in three semesters of full-time course work. All students choose to complete either a 3-credit internship or a 6-credit written thesis project, and must pass a comprehensive examination.

The following courses are program requirements:

Typical Schedule of Courses

First Year
Fall Semester
  • HP 200: History of American Architecture
  • HP 204: Historic Preservation: Development Economics (even-numbered years)
  • HP 205: Historic Preservation Law
  • HP 206:Researching Historic Structures and Sites
  • HP 395 or HP 397 elective (odd-numbered years)
Spring Semester
  • HP 201: History on the Land
  • HP 305: Historic Preservation Practice Methods
  • HP 306: Architectural Conservation I
  • HP 304: Contemporary Preservation Policy and Planning
Second Year
Fall Semester
  • HP 302: Community Preservation Project
  • HP 307: Architectural Conservation II
  • HP 204: Historic Preservation: Development Economics (even-numbered years)
  • HP 303: Internship (with summer placement)
  • HP 395 or HP 397 elective (odd-numbered years)
  • Comprehensive Examination (required)
Spring Semester (Optional)
  • HP 303: Internship
  • HP 391: Thesis (in lieu of internship by permission)
  • Other Electives

Minimum Program Total Credits 36

Required Course Descriptions

  • HP 200: History of American Architecture
    Study of architectural history to gain fluency in the stylistic terms so essential to historic preservation and to public support for conserving our architectural heritage.
    Prerequisites: Open to non-HP majors by permission. 3 Credits.
  • HP 201: History on the Land
    Identifying and interpreting evidence of the cultural forces -- early settlement patterns, transportation, industry, agriculture, planning, conservation -- that have shaped our land, buildings, towns and cities. 3 Credits.
  • HP 204: Historic Preservation: Development Economics
    Survey of economic, financial aspects of real estate development pertaining to preservation and adaptive use (markets studies, pro formas). Field trips. Actual proposal development for under-utilized historic properties. 3 Credits.
  • HP 205: Historic Preservation Law
    Legal issues in the conservation of the built environment. Basic legal techniques for protection of historic structures (historic districts, protective legislation, easements, covenants). Study of significant court decisions. 3 Credits.
  • HP 206: Researching Historic Structures and Sites
    Methods for researching historic structures and sites using archival and physical evidence, deciphering archaic building technologies and documenting structures through professional reports, architectural photography, measured drawings. Prerequisites: HP majors or by permission. 3 Credits.
  • HP 302: Community Preservation Project
    Third-semester graduate students apply professional skills to actual community preservation problems. Projects include strategy development, securing and allocating funds, research, advocacy, implementation, evaluation. 3 Credits.
  • HP 303: Internship
    Students devote a semester, typically in the summer between the second and third semesters, to do preservation work within an appropriate organization or agency. Duties of the student intern are arranged with the host institution by an agreement with the instructors and the student. Internships are evaluated by student reports, a written evaluation from the student's supervisor, and by students presenting their completed internship projects before a jury of practicing professionals. Link to Internship Guidelines. 3 Credits.
  • HP 304: Contemporary Preservation Policy and Planning
    This introduction to the professional practice of preservation planning traces the evolution of the historic preservation movement and examines contemporary preservation policy-making issues. 3 credits.
  • HP 305: Historic Preservation Practice Methods
    This course introduces students to professional practice methods for conducting historic site and structures surveys, National Register nominations, and rehabilitation investment tax credit application projects. 3 credits.
  • HP 306: Architectural Conservation I
    An examination of the physical properties of historic building materials, their deterioration mechanisms, and strategies for assessing conditions, conserving and rehabilitating historic resources. Lecture and lab. Prerequisites: HP majors or by permission. 3 Credits.
  • HP 307: Architectural Conservation II
    A continuation of Architectural Conservation I emphasizing an integrated examination of historic preservation and architectural conservation through lectures, seminars, and field and laboratory research projects. Prerequisites:HP majors or by permission and HP 306. 3 Credits.

Other Courses

  • HP 202: Special Topics
    New and specialized courses that may be offered in association with Continuing Education, typically in the summer.
  • HP 391: Masters Thesis Research
    Students may elect to do a thesis, in lieu of an internship and an elective by permission only. Total of 6 credits.
  • HP 397: Special Readings and Research
    As an elective, students may request permission to conduct special independent preservation-related research projects with historic preservation program faculty. 3 credits.
  • HP 395: Special Topics
    New and specialized courses that may be offered for Historic Preservation graduate students during the academic year.

Elective Courses

  • Graduate students may choose from graduate electives with a 200 course number or higher with permission of the Historic Preservation Program director. Special permission is required to take a 100-level course as a elective. Students also may desire to take additional courses as electives for extra credits.

  • Elective examples include: ENSC 285 Green Buildings Science & Practice; PA 305 Public and Nonprofit Budgeting; CDAE 101 Computer Aided Drafting & Design; and NR 343 Fundamentals of Geographic Information Systems

Questions? Schedule an appointment or visit? Contact the Historic Preservation Program by email at histpres@uvm.edu

Last modified March 03 2014 04:40 PM