University of Vermont

The College of Arts and Sciences

Global and Regional Studies Program

MattCarlsonResearch2012

Matthew Carlson, Associate Professor of Political Science
Faculty Research 2012

In 2012 Political Science Professor Matthew Carlson packed up his belongings and brought his wife and young daughter to live in Japan for a year to work on his book manuscript. They divided their time between two cities—Tokyo and Nagoya—the most populous and the fourth most populous urban areas in the country. Carlson was a visiting professor at Nanzan University in Nagoya and Chuo University where he worked on a book manuscript on postwar corruption scandals in Japanese politics. While in Nagoya, he was able to trace the footsteps of his grandfather who had been stationed in Nagoya in 1945 as part of the American occupation forces.  While much of the city was destroyed by bombs, much of the downtown escaped major damage, which can be seen in the picture taken by Professor Carlson’s grandfather. A view of the same shopping street shows what it looked like in 2012.

Nagoya 1945

 

 

Sakae, Nagoya taken in 1945 by Carlson’s grandfather

 

 

 

 

Nagoya 2012

 

 

 

Picture of Sakae, Nagoya taken in 2012 by Professor Carlson

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Matt Carlson's daughter Alina


While Carlson was working on his book project, he took his daughter for frequent stroller rides and trips to a nearby park called Noritake Garden. She took some of her first steps here at the location of the famous porcelain company where her great grandfather had purchased a tea set for her great grandmother that she will be given someday. While his daughter was sleeping, Carlson was able to hike up Mt. Fuji to enjoy breathtaking views from the highest point in Japan. Overall, his year spent in Japan was rewarding and refreshing and he will draw upon those experiences while teaching this year at UVM



Professor Carlson’s daughter practicing her walking skills at Noritake Garden, Nagoya

 

Mt. Fuji

 

 

 

Professor Carlson at the bottom of Mt. Fuji at the beginning of the summer climbing season.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Last modified February 26 2013 04:01 PM