University of Vermont

The College of Arts and Sciences

Department of Geography

Dr. Orzeck's new contact information:

Assistant Professor
The Department of Geography-Geology
Illinois State University
Campus Box 4400
Normal, IL 61790-4400

Email: rorzeck@ilstu.edu

Faculty - Reecia Orzeck

Photo of Reecia Orzeck

Reecia Orzeck, Ph.D. Assistant Professor

  • Ph.D., Syracuse University (2007)
  • C.V.
Area of expertise

Geography of the Middle East, global political-economy, legal geography, the body in critical and legal theory.

 

Dr. Orzeck has three areas of research interest:  The political economy of public international law; the role of international law in the Israeli-Palestinian conflict; and popular and scholarly representations of the body. Increasingly interested in academic work conditions, Dr. Orzeck has also begun to research and write about academic freedom. Dr. Orzeck teaches GEOG 070: Space, Place and Society, one of the Department of Geography’s introductory courses.  At the intermediate and advanced level, she teaches courses on Economic Geography, Geography of the Modern Middle East, and Geographies of the Body.  Dr. Orzeck holds a B.A. in Geography and Religious Studies from Queens University (1998), an M.A. in Geography from York University (2002), and a Ph.D. in Geography from Syracuse University (2007).

She is currently preparing a monograph about international law for the University of Minnesota Press.

Quote: Like many converts to Geography, I began college with other plans. Flipping through course catalogues, however, I quickly realized that I could take a very wide range of courses, and satisfy my interest in several issues and regions, from within the discipline of Geography. Moreover, once I had a few years’ worth of courses under my belt, I realized that Geography is a remarkably interdisciplinary social science—taking the best from many of the disciplines around it, not only the social and physical sciences, but from humanities disciplines like History and Literature as well. Geography felt then, and still feels, like an extraordinarily creative and exciting discipline in which to work.