University of Vermont

Prof. Dwight E. Matthews

Matthews Bio Sketch main page DE Matthews photo, Apr 2004

Dwight E. Matthews

Area of expertise:

  Analytical chemistry, mass spectrometry, proteomics, metabolomics, stable isotope tracers, and metabolite flux and kinetic measurements

Contact information:

Dr. Dwight Matthews
University of Vermont
Cook Physical Science Building - room A121
82 University Pl
Burlington, VT 05405

Dwight.Matthews@uvm.edu

phone: 802 656-8114

EDUCATION:

  • B.A. - DePauw University, Greencastle, Indiana, May 1973.
  • Ph.D. - Analytical Chemistry, Indiana University, Bloomington, Indiana, December 1977.

ACADEMIC APPOINTMENTS:

  • 1977 - 1980:  Research Instructor of Medicine, Washington University School of Medicine, St. Louis, Missouri
  • 1980 - 1986:  Research Assistant Professor of Medicine, Washington University School of Medicine, St. Louis, Missouri
  • 1986 - 1996:  Associate Professor of Biochemistry in Medicine, Cornell University Medical College, New York, NY
  • 1987 - 1996:  Associate Professor of Biochemistry in Surgery, Cornell University Medical College, New York, NY
  • July 1996 -
    • Professor of Medicine, College of Medicine, University of Vermont, Burlington, VT
    • Professor of Chemistry, College of Arts & Sciences, University of Vermont, Burlington, VT
  • 2001 - : Member of the Cell and Molecular Biology Program, University of Vermont, Burlington, VT

ADMINISTRATIVE APPOINTMENTS:

  • 1986 - 1996:  Director of the Mass Spectrometry Facility in Medicine, Cornell University Medical College, New York, NY
  • 1987 - 1996:  Director of the General Clinical Research Center Core Laboratory, Cornell University Medical College, New York, NY
  • 1996 - 2011: Director of the Mass Spectrometry Facility in the General Clinical Research Center, College of Medicine, University of Vermont, Burlington, VT
  • 2002 - 2014 Chairman, Department of Chemistry, College of Arts & Sciences, University of Vermont, Burlington, VT
  • 2005 - 2007: Director of the Proteomics Facility of the Vermont Genetics Network, University of Vermont, Burlington, Vermont,
  • 2007 - 2011: Co-director of the Proteomics Facility of the Vermont Genetics Network, University of Vermont, Burlington, Vermont
  • 2006 - : Co-director of the Proteomics and Mass Spectrometry Core Laboratory of the Vermont Center for Immunobiology and Infectious Diseases (VCIID) COBRE, University of Vermont, Burlington, Vermont

AWARDS:

PROFESSIONAL MEMBERSHIPS:

  • American Chemical Society (ACS)
  • American Physiological Society (APS)
  • American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology (ASBMB)
  • American Society for Mass Spectrometry (ASMS)
  • American Society for Nutrition (ASN)

ABOUT PROF. MATTHEWS:

Prof. Matthews has been an analytical chemist and mass spectrometrist for over 30 years developing new methods for measurement of stable isotopically labeled biomolecules by mass spectrometry. The range of mass spectrometry developments accomplished cross from isotope ratio mass spectrometry (IRMS) and the initial development of continuous flow IRMS interfacing gas chromatography to an IRMS, to gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GCMS) for metabolite measurement, to liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (LCMS) for molecules ranging from metabolites to peptides and proteins. Method developments range from quantitative measurements of concentrations to quantitative measurements of stable isotopically labeled metabolites and peptides for determination of in cell and in vivo kinetics of metabolic pathways and synthesis of metabolites and whole proteins. The focus of his work has been use of the stable isotopes as tracers for measuring kinetic rates of metabolic processes in vivo in disease and in normal health. Many of the methods developed have become standard methods in a variety of investigator laboratories and have been applied world-wide to measure kinetics of endogenous metabolites. He has also directed core laboratories in mass spectrometry and metabolite measurement for over 25 years starting at Washington University in St. Louis, Cornell University Medical College, and today at the University of Vermont.

Contributions by Dr. Matthews:

  • His early work developed new methods to measure precisely very low enrichments of stable isotopes in biological molecules. The original work developed the first gas chromatograph-combustion-isotope ratio mass spectrometer (GC-C-IRMS) that has revolutionized measurement of stable isotope abundances at natural levels. The next work was to develop gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GCMS) methodologies for again measuring precisely stable isotope ratios in metabolites in very low amounts. This mass spectrometric method development has continued throughout his scientific career. [e.g. papers 1-5]
  • 2. The purpose of the precise measurement of stable isotope enrichments at very low levels is use of these isotopes as tracers incorporated into biological molecules to measure the kinetics and metabolism of metabolites in vivo. The primary target has been direct measurement in humans, and I have developed many of the key or standard methods of stable isotope tracer use for determining in vivo kinetics. Many of these contributions are to the area of metabolomics before it was defined as such. [e.g. most papers from 6 on]
  • Other applications have involved incorporation of stable isotopes into proteins for measurement of protein synthesis and breakdown rates. [e.g. papers 18-26 & 164]
  • Development and application of proteomics methods was a natural outgrowth of his earlier protein synthesis and breakdown rate measurements. Several methods have been developed for protein quantification by mass spectrometry and proteomics, including developing the first labeled animal as a quantitative standard and developing methods for identifying and quantifying posttranslational modifications. [e.g. papers 140 on]
  • Since 1998, Prof. Matthews has contributed the lead chapter on Proteins and Amino Acids to the classic and highly used textbook Modern Nutrition in Health and Disease. This chapter provides a complete description of amino acid biochemistry as it relates to nutrition and methodologies for assessing protein and amino acid requirements in humans. [see most recent chapter entry 59]
  • In 2010 Prof. Matthews and D. Beauchemin assembled the 1088-page volume 5 of the Encyclopedia of Mass Spectrometry entitled Elemental and Isotope Ratio Mass Spectrometry. This volume is a definitive text on both isotope ratio mass spectrometry and elemental and isotopic analyses used in disciplines ranging from geochemistry, astrochemistry, forensics, environmental and biomedical sciences. [see chapter entries 53-57]

Last modified June 17 2015 03:31 PM