On This Page:

» What is an iClicker?
» Why the iClicker brand?
» Files to download
» iClicker GO (for mobile)
» Classrooms with base stations
» iClicker support at UVM
» Get iClickers for your class
» Student registration directions
» Vendor support and resources
» Practice and pedagogy
» Online resources about clickers

Using iClickers at UVM

What is an iClicker?

Notice for Mac users with OSX Mavericks (10.9): If you are having iClicker trouble,
» read this explanation of the cause and the solution.

» iClicker Resources and Webinars

The iClicker (iclicker.com) is one brand in a classification of tools referred to as "classroom response systems" or "clickers." Essentially, the iClicker is an electronic polling technology, developed by educators, that allows students to give instant feedback or answers to questions during class. Students use hand-held devices (similar to the remote controls) to enter responses by electronic signal to a central receiving station connected to a computer. Faculty can then graphically display students’ collective responses during the class for discussion.

Faculty use clickers in the classroom in a variety of ways:

Why are we focusing on the iClicker brand?

Many universities, including UVM, have decided to recommend one brand of clickers to reduce costs to students and encourage reuse of the hand-held devices, therefore reducing electronic waste. UVM's Faculty Senate Education and Research Committee have recommended iClicker as the preferred device for UVM.

Files to Download

If you're just starting, you'll need to download the correct version of the software (v6.4.2), which is available via the links below. (Warning: Version 7 is not compatible with UVM iClicker base stations)

download iclicker software site download iclicker software site


Important: iClicker is now integrated with Blackboard. The files you download with the buttons provided here are packaged with the "Blackboard Integrate" tool. If you do not want to integrate iClicker with Blackboard, using the packages on this page will create some syncing issues. In this case, you’ll need to download just the iClicker software, please email us at ctldoc@uvm.edu.

» Read about integrating the iClicker with Blackboard.


iClicker GO for Mobile Devices

This page explains the pros and cons and links to set up instructions: iClicker GO

Classrooms Equipped with iClicker Base Stations
Akin 102, 110, and 112
Angell B106 and B112
Billings 101 CCT
Dewey 212 and 314
Fleming 101
Given E131
Harris 115
Hills 122 and 234
Jeffords 110, 112, 127, and 326
Kalkin 2, 4, 110, 325
Lafayette 108, 207, 300, 309, and 403
Living and Learning 315
Marsh Life Science 235
March Austin Tupper 112
Morrill 110
Rowell 103, 110, 111, and 118
Stafford 101
Terrill 108 and 308
Votey 105 and 254
Waterman 413 and 427
Williams 301

Your classroom not on this list? Contact UVM Media Services: Classroom Technologies to request that a base station be installed: 656-8924

How to Get iClickers for Your Class

Faculty may order iClickers at the bookstore for their classes, just as they would order books. Be sure to put an order in for all the students so everyone is able to purchase one. (Note: the iClicker remote uses AAA batteries. You may want to keep a few on hand in your briefcase for your students, just in case.)

Student Registration Directions

Download 4 Powerpoint slides to display in class that present clear directions for how students register.

iClicker Vendor Support and Site Resources:

iClicker technical support

iClicker Resources

iClicker Support at UVM

The Center for Teaching and Learning can help you with your iClicker questions. We have clickers available for demos and to borrow on a trial basis.

To learn more, contact the CTL "Doctor Is In" Program: ctldoc@uvm.edu

Practice and Pedagogy

Effective teaching with clickers requires planning. Here is a list of things to consider:

  1. To get the most value out of using clickers, use them regularly each class period or at the minimum, each week throughout the semester. Students need practice and reminders to bring them to class, so start with low-stakes activities.
  2. Take the time to explain why you are using the iClicker Student Response System. Let the students know how it works and why you think it is important for learning and engagement.
  3. By using clickers, you are inviting students to participate and thus decreasing the amount of time you have to lecture. Adjust your expectations for how much content will be addressed during class.
  4. If teaching a large course, wait until after the drop/add period before collecting quiz and attendance data with your clicker.

Ways to Use iClickers in the Classroom:
The nature of the questions you write for iClicker responses can significantly effect the success of their use, so craft your clicker questions carefully. Clicker expert Derek Bruff comments that “many people think of the multiple choice question as being only about factual recall, but the one-best-answer variation probes much deeper. A really good teacher can write really good wrong answers to a question—ones that key into common student difficulties with material.” (http://media.wiley.com/product_data/excerpt/30/04702889/0470288930.pdf) Write questions to ascertain students' prior knowledge of the content, or to see if they understand the current content being presented, and use students’ responses to gauge what you should address next or clarify.

Online Resources About Clicker Technology:

University of Wisconsin Best Practices on Clicker use:
http://www4.uwm.edu/ltc/srs/faculty/best_practices.cfm

Examples of good clicker questions in the sciences:
http://cnx.org/content/m26432/latest/

Inside Higher Education interview with Derek Bruf about clicker use in higher education
http://www.insidehighered.com/news/2009/02/24/bruff

EDUCAUSE's "7 things to You Should Know about Clickers":
http://www.educause.edu/ELI/7ThingsYouShouldKnowAboutClick/156805

Agile Learning blog by Derek Bruff
Teaching with Classroom Response Systems:
Resources for engaging and assessing students with clickers across disciplines
http://derekbruff.com/teachingwithcrs/

Ohio State University's reference list of clicker articles:
http://telr.osu.edu/clickers/resources/articles.htm

Discipline-based resources on clickers
http://telr.osu.edu/clickers/teaching/ideas.htm

EDUCAUSE study:
http://www.educause.edu/EDUCAUSE+Quarterly/EDUCAUSEQuarterlyMagazineVolum/ClickersintheClassroomAnActive/157458