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Academic Programs for Learning and Engagement (APLE) in Classics

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Writing an Honors Thesis is the primary opportunity for students to engage in original research in Classics. The honors thesis is an intensive one-on-one experience with a professor that lasts for two semesters at least and culminates in a written thesis and an oral defense. Recent projects have included: a commentary on the Greek text of the Mystical Theology of Pseudo-Dionysius the Areopagite, a commentary on the Latin text of the fictional letter exchange between Seneca and Paul, a commentary on Seneca's Octavia, an investigation into Cicero's translations of Greek prose and poetry, an investigation of physical exercise and health in Roman times, and an analysis of connections between meter and content in Horace.

We often receive requests from Vermonters who are in need of Latin teaching/tutoring. We refer such folks to our most advanced Latin students, who can agree to a schedule and fee for teaching/tutoring Latin. While this is not for academic credit, it is valuable as work experience, directly relates to the Classics major, and can turn into a rewarding project that rivals an internship. Students are also encouraged to speak to the Latin clubs of the local schools, to visit Latin classes in local schools to test their interest in teaching, and to gain experience in teaching by serving as substitute teachers, tutoring, or teaching homeschoolers.

In addition, the link on the department home page to "UVM Commentaries on Latin Letters" includes many student-written commentaries (edited by Prof. Bailly). The site will continue to grow and offers an opportunity for students to publish their work for the world. Prof. Bailly would welcome independent study projects to conduct research for this project (as long as the student is concurrently enrolled in a Latin class).